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Encyclopedia > Leet
Leet
l33t, 1337
Type: Alternative (a basic cipher with unique elements of Internet slang)
Languages: English, with some use in other languages
Time period: 1980 to the present
Parent writing systems: Roman Alphabet
Arabic Numerals
Cyrillic Alphabet with influences from modern typography and punctuation
Leet
l33t, 1337

Leet or Leetspeak (often written in Leet as 1337 or 13375p34k) is a writing system used primarily on the Internet, particularly on IRC but nowadays also in most online video games. The term itself is a leet form of the word elite, and generally has the same meaning when referring to the hacking or the gaming skills of another person. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article is about algorithms for encryption and decryption. ... This Article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Numerals sans-serif Arabic numerals, known formally as Hindu-Arabic numerals, and also as Indian numerals, Hindu numerals, Western Arabic numerals, European numerals, or Western numerals, are the most common symbolic representation of numbers around the world. ... The Cyrillic alphabet (pronounced , also called azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages—Belarusian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian—and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ... Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone meaning sound, voice) is the study of the sounds of human speech. ... Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Writing systems of the world today. ... Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of instant communication over the Internet. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... Look up elite, élite in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, published in 1984 by Steven Levy introduced the term hacker and its origins to broader usage. ...


Leet began as a form of writing made to bypass word filters. It is also used to mock newbies, or n00bs, on web sites, or in gaming communities, etc. This article or section should be merged with WP:INTRO and WP:TUTOR Wikipedia is an encyclopedia written collaboratively by its readers. ... The slang term newbie (also spelled noob, newb, or n00b in leetspeak) means a newcomer to a particular corner of cyberspace, such as a game, newsgroup, the World Wide Web itself, or an operating system. ...


Leet involves the modification of written text, both by substitution of some letters, numbers, and other characters for the usual ones, and by use of characteristic variations in grammar, spelling and idiom. These perturbations are chosen, and interpreted, through visual resemblances, abstract connections (usually involving knowledge about computers), or known conventions. Leet spellings are generally not fixed, and users often take pride in developing new ones whose interpretation requires cleverness or appropriate background knowledge. For the surname, see Grammer. ... Proper spelling is the writing of a word or words with all necessary letters and diacritics present in an accepted, conventional order. ... An Idiom is an expression (i. ...


Leet has its own colloquialisms, many of which originated as jokes based on common typing errors, habits of new computer users, or knowledge of Internet culture and history. One such colloqialism is "Pie", which can be a substitute for any word or simply said in IRCs for randomness.


Leet is not solely based upon one language or character set. Greek, Russian, Chinese, and other languages have Leet forms, and leet in one language may use characters from another where they are available. As such, while it may be referred to as a "cipher", a "dialect", or a "language", Leet does not fit squarely into any of these categories. This article primarily concerns the English language variant of Leet. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


For example, the term leet itself is often written l33t, or 1337, and many other variations. After the meaning of these became widely familiar, 10100111001 came to be used in its place, because it is the binary form of 1337, making it more of a puzzle to interpret.[1] The binary numeral system, or base-2 number system, is a numeral system that represents numeric values using two symbols, usually 0 and 1. ...

Contents

Types of 1337

The following two sections explain about the two most common forms of 1337; True 1337, and Obscure 1337.


True 1337 (True Leet)

True 1337 is a term referring to the form of writing which is essentially an exaggerated form of typing with typos. True 1337 is based on sounds, rather than Obscure 1337, which is purely the modification of text. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


e.g.

  • A — ai (i.e. Way — Wai) / uh (i.e. a)
  • E — 3, eee etc.
  • I — i, eye, 3y3
  • O — oa, oh, 0, or simply O
  • U — u, j00, chu, etc.
  • Y — why, y, weye

To give you a better idea: here are some words and acronyms that are commonly used, and changed, when writing in True 1337.


e.g.

  • The — Teh / T3h
  • What — Wut
  • You — J00 / Chu
  • Really — RLY / ORLY
  • OMG (Oh my God / Oh my gosh) — ZOMG
  • Like — Liek / Lyk
  • Way — Wai
  • Hot — Hawt
  • Cold — Kuld/Culd
  • Oh my F**king God What The F**k - ZOMGZZWTF

Хера се's an example of True 1337 used in a sentence...

  • Normal Spelling: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • True 1337: Teh kw1k br0wn f0x (or ph0x), jumpt ov3r teh laiz3 d4wg

Obscure 1337 (Obscure Leet)

Obscure 1337 (Obscure Leet) is an underground language, less practical, and more time-consuming to type out than True 1337, that is often employed by people who wish to keep their conversations closed to a certain group, being harder to read than True 1337, and/or to bypass word filters on Web sites. Obscure 1337 is based purely on the modification of text, rather than being based on sounds, like True 1337.


Backslashes, dashes, numbers, parentheses, brackets, and few actual letters make up Obscure 1337. For more information on this see the Letter Substitutions section of this page, just below this section.


Here's an example of Obscure 1337, used in a sentence...

  • Normal Spelling: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Obscure 1337: 7|-|3 O_|_|1(|< (or |<//i|<) ß12[]|/// |=[]>< ']|_ /||*5 []/312 7|-|3 |_42'/ 1)[]9

Letter substitutions

A major part of most variations of leet is the substitution of non-letter symbols for letters in a word or in a phrase. The symbol chosen is flexible-—anything that the reader can make sense of is valid leet. The practice of adding excess numbers and symbols to a leet word is frowned upon by many users of leet, and it's frequently used sarcastically to mock a newbie leet speaker. Noob redirects here. ...


Alphabet 1337

A B C D * E F G H I * J K L * M N O * P Q R * S T * U V W X Y Z *
4
/
@
/-
^
aye
8
6
13
|3
ß
P>
|:
 !3
(3
/3
)3
[
¢
<
(
{
)
|o
[)
I>
|>
 ?
T)
|)
0
3
&

£
ë
[-
|=-
|=
ƒ
|#
ph
/=
6
&
(_+
9
C-
gee
(γ,
#
/-/
[-]
]-[
)-(
(-)
 :-:
|~|
|-|
]~[
}{
]-[
 ?
}-{
1
 !
|
eye
3y3
]
_|
_/
¿
</
(/
ʝ
X
|<
|{
ɮ
1
£
7
1_
|
|_
lJ
|v|
]V[
{V}
|/|
//
(u)
(V)
(/)
/|
^^
/|/|
//.
.
/^^
^/
||
//
[]
<>
{}
[]
// []
/V
0
()
oh
[]
¤
|*
|o

|^(o)
|>
|"
9
[]D

|7
(_,)
()_
0_
<|
2
|?
/2
|^
lz
®
[z
12
l2
Я

|2
ʁ
5
$
z
§
ehs
es
7
+
-|-
1
']['
(_)
|_|
v
L|
/
//
vv
'//
'
^/
(n)
V/
X/
|/
_|_/
_:_/
Ш
ɰ
%
><
Ж
}{
ecks
×
)(
j
`/
Ψ
φ
λ
Ч
7
¥
2
~/_
%
>_
ʒ
- 0 can be used for O or D -- 1 is used in place of I, L or T -- 2 replaces Z or R -- £ can replace E or L -- 7 works for T, L or Y -

This chart applies to character replacements in both 'True Leet' and 'Obscure Leet'. Please note this table is to be used as a guide and not a full translation tool. Leet is ever changing and not all replacements will, or can, be included.

Another use for 1337 is in the creation of paraphrase passwords. By using this method one can create a fairly secure password and it will still be easy to remember. True 1337 is most commonly used for this, since most Web sites will restrict you to using just letters and numbers in a password, and limit you to just 36 characters. Since typing a "W", "M", or "X", etc. in Obscure 1337 can use up to four spaces, it's more practical to use True 1337, which usually uses the same, if not fewer, characters in a given word.


Leet in the Internet Social Corpus

B1FF or BIFF was the most famous pseudonym and the prototypical newbie on Usenet. ... Noob redirects here. ... B3ta is a humorous British website, described as a puerile digital arts community by The Guardian [1]. It was founded by Rob Manuel, Denise Wilton and Cal Henderson. ... DRIV3R or Driver 3, is a racing, shooting, and adventure video game. ... Layer Cake (also spelled L4YER CAK3) is a 2004 British gangster thriller, directed by Matthew Vaughn. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... NUMB3RS (Numbers) is an American television show that follows FBI Special Agent Don Eppes (Rob Morrow) and his mathematical genius brother, Charlie Eppes (David Krumholtz), who develops formulae to predict the actions of various criminals. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[7] commonly abbreviated PS3) is Sony Computer Entertainments third video game console. ... Reanimation is a remix album by nu metal band Linkin Park, released after and based upon their first album, Hybrid Theory. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an American actor and film producer. ... Dawsons Creek director, see Morgan J. Freeman. ... S1m0ne film poster S1M0NE, also seen as Simone, is a 2002 science fiction drama film written, produced and directed by New Zealander Andrew Niccol, starring Al Pacino. ... Unan1mous (Unanimous) is an American reality television program that premiered on the Fox Network on March 22, 2006. ... See also: Wipeout 3: Special Edition The Wipeout series had been lying dormant for three years until Wipeout 3 was released on the 8th of September in Europe. ... Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story is a comedy from 20th Century Fox, written and directed by Rawson Thurber and available on DVD or VHS December 2004. ... Jeopardy! is a popular international television quiz game show, originally devised by Merv Griffin, who also created Wheel of Fortune. ... Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, published in 1984 by Steven Levy introduced the term hacker and its origins to broader usage. ... Brian Hugh Warner (born January 5, 1969), better known by his stage name Marilyn Manson, is a professional musician, known for his outrageous stage persona and image as the lead singer of the shock rock band that bears the same name. ... Mechanical Animals is Marilyn Mansons third full-length album, released on September 15, 1998. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Word endings

Use of xor and zor

The suffix -(x)xor (also -zor, or other variations thereof) can be used like the standard English -er and -or, in order to derive an agent noun from a verb. Examples includes pwnzor and haxxor, meaning one who pwns or hacks, respectively. Image File history File links Circle-question-red. ... In linguistics, agent noun (or nomen agentis) is a word that is derived from another word denoting an action (A) and that has the meaning `entity that does A. Agent noun (or nomen agentis) is also the name of this derivational meaning (also called a derivateme). ... PWN may refer to: Pwn, an Internet slang term Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe (National Science Publisher), a Polish book publisher Patras Wireless Network, a wireless community network, operating in Patras, Greece Phrack World News, a service of the now-defunct Phrack magazine An example is ferris PWNS in halo2 Category... A hack in progress in Lobby 7 at MIT. Hack is a term in the slang of the technology culture which has come into existence over the past few decades. ...


"Xxor","zor", "zorzz", and "xxorxx" are also superlatives. They put the word they are modifying to a higher degree of intensity.


The agent nouns containing these suffixes can then be turned into a verb, usually be the addition of -ed or -'d, making the phrase 'you have been pwnzored' equivalent to 'you have been pwned'. It can also be suffixed to the stem of any verb, with no apparent change in meaning. The resulting verbs can be conjugated as regular English verbs. Verbs in the English language are a lexically and morphologically distinct part of speech which describes an action, an event, or a state. ...


Due to the phonetic sound of xor ([z], as in xylophone), Leet speakers have begun using zor and zorz as well and in similar context. The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia (Nettl 1956, p. ...


Using ri in combination with xxor brings about long suffixes for higher levels of irony (e.g., "I am the suxorixorage"). The suffix -izzle may also be added to words in the same way as xor, such as in owndizzle. This practice entered the popular culture based on rapper Snoop Dogg's use of the slang.[citation needed] Preach!!! lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol... West Coast rapper Snoop Dogg performing for the US Navy For information on rap music, see hip hop music. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ...


Some insist that xxor was created as a divination from other abbreviations, e.g. X meaning cross and O + R with an implied V between them, altogether meaning crossover, a clever synonym for anything translated into leet.


In the phrase "rock your b0xx0rz," b0xx0rz may not refer to boxers (i.e. underwear) but might refer to boxes (in computer slang, computers, though boxen or b0xx3n may be more commonly used in this context). The more naïve interpretation "rocks your boxers" is still meaningful, however, as the sentiment is much the same and is often used to carry a connotation that one was "rocked" so hard they felt it in their boxer shorts. This is also similar to the phrase "to scare one's pants off", or imply figurative domination through sexual innuendo. Boxer shorts (also known as loose boxers or, imprecisely, as boxers) are a type of underwear, worn by men. ... For the types and styles of womens undergarments, see lingerie. ... 1. ...


Use of the -age suffix

A verb may be changed to a noun simply by adding -age, or an adjective to a noun with -ness. For example, speak becomes speakage, or Leet becomes Leetness, as in "I know Leetness speakage", meaning "I know Leetspeak". The addition of this suffix to the lexicon of popular culture is attributed to Pauly Shore.[citation needed] Paul Montgomery Shore a. ...


The -age suffix has also been attributed to the punk/hardcore band Descendents, and sometimes with the band ALL.[citation needed] The lead singer of the former, Milo Aukerman, possesses a Ph.D. in biochemistry, and comically associates the band and himself with nerds and geeks. Members of the band have been involved with computers and software since the early 1980s. The Descendents commonly add the suffix -age to song and album titles such as "Myage", "Cameage", "Bikage", "Liveage", "Tonyage", "Marriage", "Cleavage", and even "Coolidge". Most of these songs can be found on their 1981 release Milo Goes to College (also ending with the -age sound). A Descendents tribute album was appropriately named Homage, which recognized the band's most common word morphology. Stockage was a punk music festival highlighted by performances from Descendents and ALL. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Hardcore Emo is a style of music that existed primarily in the early-mid 90s, also known as chaotic emo. Many Hardcore Emo bands are often misinterpreted as Emo Violence bands. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ALL Promotional Photograph (Epitaph Records) ALL is a spin off punk band formed by members of The Descendents. ... Dr. Milo Aukerman (born 1964 in Lomita, California) is an American singer, songwriter and scientist/biochemist. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Milo Goes to College is the 1982 release by the punk band The Descendents. ... In 2002 members of the legendary punk bands Descendents, ALL, and Black Flag held the first Stockage festival in Fort Collins, Colorado. ...


Due to the fluid nature of Leet, such derived nouns can be further re-purposed as verbs, such as "Complete Pwnage" (i.e., Completely owned).


Words ending in -ed

When forming a past participle ending in -ed, the Leet user may replace the -e with an apostrophe, as was common in poetry of previous centuries, (e.g. "pwned" becomes "pwn'd"). Contrary to poetic use, however, the apostrophe is often used to emphasize the pronounciation of the vowel. Note that the conventions of Leet allow for some misplaced punctuation, since it is assumed that the user is typing very quickly; therefore the apostrophe may shift its position without changing the word's meaning. It is fairly common for the e simply to be dropped. The word ending may also be substituted by -t (e.g. owned becomes ownt). The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... A player is pwned in a game of Counter-Strike. ... The slang term pwn (see pronunciation note below), used primarily in the Internet gaming culture, means to soundly defeat an opponent. ...


Use of the -& suffix

Words ending in -and, -anned, -ant, or a similar sound can sometimes be spelled with an ampersand (&) to express the ending sound. This is most commonly used with the word banned (i.e. “I'm sorry, you've been b&”). An alternate form of "B&" is "B7", as the ampersand is typed with the "7" key. It is often seen in the phrase "IBB7" (in before banned).


Grammar

Leet, like other hacker slang, enjoys a looser grammar than standard English. The loose grammar, just like loose spelling, encodes some level of emphasis, ironic or otherwise. A reader must rely more on intuitive parsing of Leet to determine the meaning of a sentence rather than the actual sentence structure. In particular, speakers of Leet are fond of verbing nouns, turning verbs into nouns (and back again) as forms of emphasis, e.g. "Bob rocks" is weaker than "Bob r0xx0rz" (note spelling), which is weaker than "Bob is t3h r0xx0rz" (note grammar), which is even weaker than "OMFG D00d Bob is t3h UBER 1337 R0XX0RZ LOL". In essence, all of these mean "Bob rocks," not necessarily the other options. Added words and misspellings add to the speaker's enjoyment. Leet, like in other hacker slang, employs overgeneralization in construction of new words. For example, if haxored is the past tense of the verb "to hack" (hack → haxor → haxored), then winzored would be easily understood to be the past tense conjugation of "to win," even if the reader had not seen that particular word before. The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... It has been suggested that Syntax analysis be merged into this article or section. ... Look up Structure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Verbing is a common form of etymology and neologism in English, as well as a type of wordplay and a form of anthimeria, in which words other than verbs are used as verbs. ... A reader might be several different things, depending on the context: there are several cities in the United States named Reader a reader is a minor member of the clergy in some Christian churches a reader is a book of different pieces of writing, often by many authors, collected for... A word is a unit of language that carries meaning and consists of one or more morphemes which are linked more or less tightly together, and has a phonetical value. ...


An increasingly common characteristic of Leet is changing its grammatical usage to be deliberately incorrect. For instance, instead of saying "Bob r0x0r" ("Bob rocks"), one might write, "Bob am teh r0x0r" ("Bob is the one who rocks"), or "Bob r teh r0x0rz" ("Bob are the rocks"), both of which incorrectly use the verb "to be," and render the verb "to rock" as a noun. It is deliberately used to increase the level of irony of the statement. This deliberate misspelling is similar to the cult following of the "All your base are belong to us" phrase. Indeed, the online and computer communities have been international from their inception, so that spellings and phrases typical of non-native speakers are quite common. In English, a noun or noun substantive is a lexical category which can co-occur with (in)definite articles and attributive adjectives, and function as the head of a noun phrase. ... The phrase is a piece of subtitled dialogue from the introduction to Zero Wing. ...


Rhyming and rhythm

While Leet is not generally spoken, it can be deemed close to stress-timed. Care is taken by users of Leet to combine similarly timed words, or to encipher words into ways such that they have a common rhythm or rhyme. An example of this is the phrase "roffle my woffles" (note both spelling error (woffle) and word timing) ("roffle" is derived from the phonetic pronunciation of the acronym ROFL). Other examples would be "roxorz your boxorz" (in this case, rhyming). Leet can be highly lyrical and stylistic (even poetic), the way a typical pidgin language can be. In linguistics, the timing in a language comprises the rhythmic qualities of speech, in particular how syllables are distributed across time. ... For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film) Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... A rhyme is a repetition of identical or similar terminal sounds in two or more different words and is most often used in poetry. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... A pidgin, or contact language, is the name given to any language created, usually spontaneously, out of a mixture of other languages as a means of communication between speakers of different tongues. ...


Over-exclamation and other emphasis

Another common feature of Leet is over-exclamation, where a sentence is postfixed with many exclamation marks. Sentence, derived from Latin sententia (perception, in the subjective sense of how one feels reality is), has three common meanings: Sentence (linguistics) Sentence (mathematical logic) Open sentence (a term that mathematics teachers attempted to introduce, but not used by mathematicians) Sentence (law) Sentence (music) This is a disambiguation page &#8212...


In some cases, because the exclamation symbol (!) resides on the same key as the number one (1) on QWERTY keyboards, over-exclamation can be accidentally (or purposely) typed with extraneous numerical digits, owing to the excitement of the typist: "This is really exciting!!!!!11". This was especially likely in the context of fast-paced online multiplayer games, where typing carefully leaves the gamer vulnerable to attack. Some deliberately type the numbers, while others take the exclamation further and sarcastically replace some of the digits with words, "This is really exciting!!!!!!11eleven1111one". (In some cases you may throw in an "eleventy", "eleventy-billion", "shift+1", "UNO/uno", or even a two. Also, "one" may be replaced with "ONE" or its 1337sp33|< counterparts, e.g. 0||3.) The QWERTY keyboard layout used for Windows in the US QWERTY (pronounced ) is the most common modern-day keyboard layout on English-language computer and typewriter keyboards. ...


Other common typos and uses, whether intentional or otherwise:

  • the use of the adjacent ~ (tilde) and @ keys
  • the mistyping of the question mark following the same line as the exclamation mark, the most common being / and slash, as in "What are you talking about???//??/?SLASH//?QUESTIONMARK?" (Again, you may also add "shift+/" or "shift+slash" to this.) A similar derivation comes from the location of the Z key next to the left shift. When typing words such as OMG, it has become common to instead type ZOMG to simulate the accidental typing of the Z in an effort to press the shift key.

In addition to variations on punctuation-based emphasis, it is common to combine two (or more) words and capitalize them to show emphasis. Perhaps most common would be the combination of OMG and WTF to produce OMGWTF. For irony or excitement, some will then add ancillary SMS phrases to the end (e.g. OMGWTFBBQHAX!). This ending generally has the same meaning as the saying "...with gravy," commonly added to the end of sentences. This creates OMGWTFBBQHAX, meaning, "Oh my god; what the f***!? (with added emphasis)?." Also common is NOWAI (from "no way"). Another phonetic abbreviation is omigawd (OMG with a "valley girl" accent, which is visible in the phonetic word structure). // txt redirects here. ... As featured in The Independent Tiger Weekly. ... In the United States, Valley girl, or Val, is a term coined for rich female residents of the San Fernando Valley, and originated in the 1970s. ...


As with most alternative Leet spellings or grammar, inclusion of these traits in a sentence is often done on purpose. The intent is typically to either lighten the mood, strengthen a point (by mocking someone who may not be party to the discussion), or convey a sense of irony, depending on the context.


Vocabulary

Main article: Internet slang

Many words originally derived from Leet slang have now become part of the modern Internet slang, such as "pwned". The primary driving force of new vocabulary in Leet is the need to describe new phenomena. Another force is common misspelling and mistyping such as "teh", and intentional misspellings, especially the "z" at the end of words ("skillz"). Another prominent example of a surviving Leet expression is w00t (now sometimes purposely spelled as w0t0), an exclamation of joy. This Article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... PWN may refer to: Pwn, an Internet slang term Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe (National Science Publisher), a Polish book publisher Patras Wireless Network, a wireless community network, operating in Patras, Greece Phrack World News, a service of the now-defunct Phrack magazine An example is ferris PWNS in halo2 Category... Teh is a common misspelling of the, originating from a common typographical error. ... This article is about the word. ...


Additionally, new words (or corruptions thereof) may arise from a need to make one's username unique. As any given Internet service reaches more people, the number of names available to a given user is drastically reduced. While many users may wish to have the username "CatLover," for example, in many cases it is only possible for one user to have the moniker. As such, degradations of the name may evolve, such as "C@L0vr." As the Leet cipher is highly dynamic, there is a wider possibility for multiple users to share the "same" name, through combinations of phonemes and transliterations. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Other common misspellings now standard in Leet are:

  • evar, evah, and eva for ever, generally used in phrases like "Worst. [Something]. Evar." (e.g. "Worst. Game. Evar.") This construct is largely credited as a reference to a phrase often uttered by The Comic Book Guy, a recurring character on The Simpsons, which, itself, is a reference to a complaint uttered about the quality of the show by participants in the alt.tv.simpsons newsgroup.
  • German ist for is has crept into Leet, including English encipherings. It is frequently used with word death ("Mp3 ist death."). Also, "krieg," German for war, in this context means, approximately, favorable ("Mp3 ist krieg."). This usage is common among Internet users who are fans of black metal.
  • über (German: above, over) has also made its way into gaming communities to represent a quality of superiority. It usually appears as a prefix attached to adjectives, ("His rushes are überquick;" "The rocket launcher is überpowerful") although it is occasionally used as a standalone descriptor ("Her playing style is über", meaning "Her playing style is great."). This is often written without the umlaut over the u.
  • smrt, smrat, or samrt for smart—The former may also be an intentional reference to an episode of The Simpsons in which Homer misspells smart in song whilst burning his high school diploma: "I am so smart! I am so smart! S-M-R-T! I mean S-M-A-R-T!"
  • Teh, often spelled t3h, standing for the.
  • gom for omg, meaning "Oh My God" or "Oh My Gosh".
  • J00 for you—This originates from either the J or Ch sound when the word you is following a consonant, such as "Don't you know?" which sounds like "Don't joo/chu know?" when spoken. It may also derive from other languages where J has the same sound as Y.
  • Ma or Mah for my. This originated from either a southern dialect (in the case of "Mah") of pronunciation or possibly rap/hip hop pronunciations[citation needed] of the word. Similarly, meh can stand for me.[2]

This article contains a list of recurring characters from The Simpsons with descriptions. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... alt. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The umlaut mark (or simply umlaut) and the trema or diaeresis mark (or simply diaeresis) are two diacritics consisting of a pair of dots placed over a letter. ... Homer Goes to College is the third episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Main article: Secondary education High school is a name used in some parts of the world, and particularly in North America, to describe the last segment of compulsory education. ... A diploma (from Greek diploma) is a certificate or deed issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that testifies that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, or confers an academic degree. ... Teh is a common misspelling of the, originating from a common typographical error. ... West Coast rapper Snoop Dogg performing for the US Navy For information on rap music, see hip hop music. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ...

Kekeke

The expression "kekeke" is widely believed to have come from Koreans. In the Korean language, people expressed laughter in writing by repeating the letter "ㅋ" (Korean letter for the hard k [as opposed to the g or soft k, "ㄱ"], called 키읔 or "kieuk") many times over. Since early versions of StarCraft did not allow players to write in Hangul (the Korean writing system), Koreans would romanize their language. Hence, kekeke was born. The phrase is an onomatopoetic Korean phrase similar to the English and French "hahaha", Spanish "jajaja", Chinese "hehehe", or Japanese "fufufu" (also romanized as "huhuhu"; the Japanese syllable in question begins with ɸ, a voiceless bilabial fricative similar to both English "f" and "h"), and is meant to express laughter. It is often used in-game as an expression of exaltation or as a form of mockery. Commonly, it is associated with a simple StarCraft tactic that involves massing a large number of units and using them to attack an enemy base before its owner is sufficiently prepared to defend. This is often called a Zergling Rush, after the StarCraft faction for whom the tactic was created. The phrase "Zerg Rush kekeke!!!" is sometimes used outside of the game to indicate any form of overwhelming or swarming force. StarCraft is a real-time strategy computer game by Blizzard Entertainment. ... Jamo redirects here. ... A romanization or latinization is a system for representing a word or language with the Roman (Latin) alphabet, where the original word or language used a different writing system. ... Look up onomatopoeia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A young child laughing Laff redirects here. ... A zergling from StarCraft:Brood War. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tank rush. ...


Some English speakers use "kekeke" as a form of laughing, similar to giggling, although it is still primarily used by Korean speakers.


The phrase also occurs on the MMORPG World of Warcraft, although its origin is completely different. There are two major factions in the game which 'speak' different languages. All chat text entered by a member of one faction will appear jumbled to a member of the other, and vice versa. As a result, members of the Alliance faction will see "kek" when a member of the Horde faction had typed "lol". The cipher works a little differently for longer words though, and "hahaha" becomes "kekekek". This has become an in-joke amongst World of Warcraft players. This is also a good example of what is known as an Easter Egg in the game World of Warcraft. The game writers at Blizzard used hundreds of famous phrases and names in populating the game world. KeK (Orcish for LOL) was intentional. An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... World of Warcraft (commonly abbreviated as WoW) is a massive multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) developed by Blizzard Entertainment. ... The first easter egg. ...


Kekeke is also used as an evil laugh and is used by players using devious tactics and/or playing evil characters. While this usage is thought to have its roots in the laugh of Kefka, the main villain from Final Fantasy VI, kekeke is commonly associated with laughs of devious characters in Japanese manga, anime, and video games, and has made its way through various translations. An evil laugh is a stock megalomaniacal laugh by a villain in fiction. ... Artwork by Yoshitaka Amano Kefka Palazzo is a fictional character of the Square Co. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Manga )   is the Japanese word for comics and print cartoons. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... This article is about computer and video games. ...


Pr0n

Pr0n or pron is Leet slang for pornography. Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Pornographic movies Pornography (Porn) (from Greek πόρνη (porne) prostitute and γραφή (grafe) writing), more informally referred to as porn or porno, is the explicit representation of the human body or sexual activity with the goal of sexual arousal. ...


This is a deliberately inaccurate spelling/pronunciation for porn, where a zero is often used to replace the letter O. It is sometimes used in legitimate communications (such as email discussion groups, Usenet, chat rooms, and internet web pages) to circumvent language and content filters, which may reject messages as offensive or spam. The word also helps prevent search engines from associating commercial sites with pornography—which might result in unwelcome traffic. Pr0n is also sometimes spelled backwards (n0rp) to further obscure the meaning to potential uninformed readers. Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The success of the Google search engine was mainly due to its powerful PageRank algorithm and its simple, easy-to-use interface. ...


It can also refer to ASCII art depicting pornographic images, or to photos of the internals of consumer and industrial hardware. ASCII art, an artistic medium relying primarily on computers for presentation, consists of pictures pieced together from characters (preferably from the 95 printable characters defined by ASCII). ...


Prawn, a spoof of the misspelling, has started to come into use, as well; in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, a pornographer films his movies on 'Prawn Island'. Conversely, in Kingdom of Loathing prawn, referring to a kind of crustacean, is spelled pr0n, leading to the creation of food items such as “pr0n chow mein”. Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (released in October 2002) is the fourth video game in the hit Grand Theft Auto series. ... Kingdom of Loathing (KoL) is a humorous multiplayer rpg browser game designed and operated by Asymmetric Publications (including creator Zack Jick Johnson and writer Josh Mr. ... Superfamilies Penaeoidea Aristeidae Benthesicymidae Penaeidae Sicyoniidae Solenoceridae Sergestoidea Luciferidae Sergestidae Prawns are edible, shrimp-like crustaceans, belonging to the sub-order Dendrobranchiata [1]. They are distinguished from the superficially similar shrimp by the gill structure which is branching in prawns (hence the name, dendro=tree; branchia=gill), but is lamellar... Classes & Subclasses Branchiopoda Phyllopoda Sarsostraca Remipedia Cephalocarida Maxillopoda Thecostraca Tantulocarida Branchiura Pentastomida Mystacocarida Copepoda Ostracoda Myodocopa Podocopa Malacostraca Phyllocarida Hoplocarida Eumalacostraca The crustaceans (Crustacea) are a large group of arthropods, comprising approximately 52,000 described species [1], and are usually treated as a subphylum [2].They include various familiar animals...


Pwn

Main articles: pwn and owned

Pwn refers to the domination of a player in a video game or argument (rather than just a win). For example, in a multiplayer first-person shooter game, a player with a default starting gun defeats an opponent carrying a vastly superior weapon. This would indicate dominant skill in the player with the inferior weapon, who outplayed (pwned) the player with superior firepower. As is a common characteristic of Leet, the term has also been adapted into a noun and adjective, pwnage, which can refer to the situation of pwning or to the superiority of its subject (e.g., "He is a very good player. He is pwnage."). PWN may refer to: Pwn, an Internet slang term Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe (National Science Publisher), a Polish book publisher Patras Wireless Network, a wireless community network, operating in Patras, Greece Phrack World News, a service of the now-defunct Phrack magazine An example is ferris PWNS in halo2 Category... Owned (often typed in leet speak among gamers) is an internet slang word used commonly in gaming circles to acknowledge a form of superiority through the downfall of another entity, be it another gaming clan, or a single user. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A gun is a common name given to a device that fires high-velocity projectiles. ...


There are several commonly accepted theories about its origin, most of which suggest derivation from the word own, a term once used by hackers to indicate full control over a computer. The word pwn means virtually the same as own. also said that it was a mistake made on warcraft by one of the programers and it was picked up by many of the players the spread from there. A hack in progress in Lobby 7 at MIT. Hack is a term in the slang of the technology culture which has come into existence over the past few decades. ...


Some people pronounce pwn as p'own or poon. Since the letter p on a QWERTY keyboard is right next to the letter o, it likely derives from a typographical error, which was eventually embraced by Leetspeakers. The QWERTY keyboard layout used for Windows in the US QWERTY (pronounced ) is the most common modern-day keyboard layout on English-language computer and typewriter keyboards. ...


A few theories state that pwn originates from "pure ownage," "player own," "power own," "perfectly own," or "pistol own." Using pwn rather than own means that one has beaten his opponent to a higher degree than own. Another theory is that the term came into being through the misspelling of the word pawn, pawn being the lowest prized chess piece.[citation needed] Therefore, when one has pwned someone, they have captured a more highly prized and powerful piece, such as a bishop, rook, or queen, with the lowest piece, hence pawn. However, even this word has been purposefully used as p4wn3d, as in, "I p4wn3d you." Initial placement of the pawns. ...


Another theory is based around online forum speak, where the text :p is usually seen as a smiley sticking its tongue out. Users would type :pwned and when the program rendered :p, it would show up as a round face, standing in for the o. The smiley has gone through many incarnations over the years, but it consistently retains the same features. ...


Yet another theory is that a Warcraft custom map maker misspelled "own" in his map. The phrase then spread. One more theory is that a Counter-Strike mod maker also misspelled "own" when writing a script to have "Player1 just got (p)wned by Player2!"


n00b

Main article: newbie

Within Leet, the term n00b (and derivations thereof) is used extensively. The word means newbie (as in new and inexperienced or uninformed), and is used as a means of segregating the "elite" members of a group from outsiders. There have been other variations of the term. For example, nub, nubcake (sometimes spelled nubcaek), naab (from the Pakistani accent), n00blin, neeb, nubsauce, "n00bz0r", "nubslice", scr00ble mcn00ble, and n00blet (a n00b is somebody who is inferior to another person). Noob redirects here. ...


Though they are often used interchangeably, there is a widely accepted separation of the definitions of newb and n00b: a newb is a person who is new to something, while a n00b is a detestable or inferior person. It is used in a derogatory sense, implying the target is being ignorant of his or her own failures, blaming others without reason, failing to learn, etc. Example: "Player One is a newb because he joined the game yesterday. Player Two is a n00b, because he has played the game for a year and still can't win." The word noob is the most common insult in all online games. The term "nub" means that the player who said it recognizes that they are new to the game.


In primitive Leet, as used on BBS systems in the 1980s and into the very early 1990s, the usual term was Christmas Kiddie. A variant was greenie or Christmas greenie which was derived from the cowboy slang greenhorn. Christmas Kiddie which referred to the phenomenon where BBS systems were flooded with new members immediately following Christmas and Hanukkah because modems were a common holiday gift. If the kiddie was young, the term ruggie (derived from rugrat meaning child) might be used. Christmas is an annual holiday that marks the birth of Jesus Christ of Nazareth. ... Hanukkah (Hebrew: ‎), the Festival of Rededication (also known incorrectly as the Festival of Lights) is an eight-day Jewish holiday beginning on the 25th day of Kislev, which can occur in very late November, or throughout December. ... A modem (from modulate and demodulate) is a device that modulates an analogue carrier signal to encode digital information, and also demodulates such a carrier signal to decode the transmitted information. ...


As the Internet evolved and modems saw a decline, the term Christmas Kiddie was shortened to just Kiddie with the meaning morphing slightly to indicate someone who did not know a lot about what they were doing online, and were just running scripts provided by other, more experienced users. This typically, but not necessarily, referred to children or noobs who had recently discovered the online world and were experimenting with various hacking scripts available. A modem (from modulate and demodulate) is a device that modulates an analogue carrier signal to encode digital information, and also demodulates such a carrier signal to decode the transmitted information. ...


Suxxor or suxorz

Suxxor (pronounced suhk-zohr) is a derogatory term which originated in warez culture and is currently used in multi-user environments such as multiplayer video games and instant messaging. The word is a modified version of the phrase “to suck”, and the meaning is the same as the English slang. It is the opposite of roxor.[citation needed] Warez refers primarily to copyrighted material traded in violation of copyright law. ... A screenshot of PowWow, one of the first instant messengers with a graphical user interface Instant messaging or IM is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ...


Suxorz could also be interpreted as a combination of Internet slang and Emoticons, "Sux" being something that is generally bad, "Orz" being someone frustrated so much they're on the ground or bashing their head on the floor out of frustration. In whole it can mean "It's so bad that I want to bash my head against the ground."


There are two main uses: as a verb and a noun. Using the word as a verb, one could say, “Dude, that suxxorz!”, meaning, “Dude, that sucks.” Using the word as a noun, one might say, “You are a suxxor.”, meaning “You are a bad person; you are bad at what you do.” Literally translated, this means, “You are the suck”, but it could also mean, “you are a sucker (i.e. fool).” The two variations appeared independently: the verb version is antonymous to roxxor (Leet for “to rock”), and the noun could be a counterpart to haxor (Leet for hacker). The ELinks web browser, set to Leet language, on the Leet language version of Google. ...


Suxxor is one of the early Leet words to use the -xor word-ending.


LOL

Main article: LOL (Internet slang)
? This section may contain original research or unattributed claims.
Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.

Among the early Internet slang was LOL, an indication of appreciation of humor, literally meaning “Laughing Out Loud” or “Lots Of Laughs”. Similar acronyms were quickly added to the lexicon, including ROFL (“Rolling On the Floor Laughing”), LMAO (“Laughing My Ass Off”), and the combination of the two; ROFLMAO ("Rolling On the Floor Laughing My Ass Off"). Derivations of the acronym quickly became incorporated into the Leet vocabulary. LOL can also be displayed typed as lawl. ROFL or ROTFL can also be combined with LOL- ROTFLOL (Rolling On The Floor Laughing Out Loud) Look up LOL, lol in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Circle-question. ...


Leet is prone to the corruption of words to suit rhythm and rhyming.[citation needed] This, in addition to various ironic corruptions of the words (such as ROFLcaeks, ROFLcopter, ROFLtaco, LMAOnade, LMAOtank, LOLLERskates, LMAOynnaise, LOLLERgasm, LOLipops, LOLLERcaust, and LOLLERcoaster, etc.), has led to the creation of tongue-in-cheek words and phrases that don't actually utilize the original acronym, such as “roffle my woffles [sic]” and lawlsauce.[citation needed] Many people will pronounce the acronym as an actual word. For example, instead of saying each letter individually (“L-O-L”), the speaker will phoneticize the acronym's pronunciation (lawl or loll). More often than not, however, lawl or lawlz is used sarcastically as a contrast to LOL in a number of ways. It can be used in place of "LOL" to express how a joke was, in actuality, unfunny. It can be used in a self-deprecating fashion, resembling something of a resigned sigh (e.g. "I just got owned again. Lawl."). It can be used to provide additional sarcasm to a statement (e.g. "Yeah, best idea evar. Lawl.").[citation needed] It can also sometimes be used in a sarcastic but non-hostile manner to express weak amusement, much like a polite laugh or the emotive term, "heh.".


The word "lawl" is now starting to be used, which is the spelling of the pronounciation of lol as a word.[citation needed]


See also

Related

ASCII art, an artistic medium relying primarily on computers for presentation, consists of pictures pieced together from characters (preferably from the 95 printable characters defined by ASCII). ... An emoticon (pronounced (IPA) ), also called a smiley, is a sequence of ordinary printable characters, such as :-), ^_^, ._. ... This Article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jeff K. is one of several fictitious update writers for the popular humor website Something Awful. ... Megatokyo is a webcomic created by Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston, debuting on August 14, 2000,[1] and then written and illustrated solely by Gallagher as of July 17, 2002. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... A typographical error, or typo, is a mistake made during the typing process. ... In the French language, verlan is the inversion of syllables in a word which is found in slang and youth language. ... In computing, a script kiddie (occasionally script bunny, script kitty, script kiddo or skiddie) is a derogatory term for inexperienced crackers who use scripts and programs developed by others, without knowing what they are or how they work, for the purpose of compromising computer accounts and files, and for launching...

Similar and related dialects

The orthodox spellings of common words are often altered to make a political point, particularly in informal writing on the Internet, but also in some serious political writing that opposes the status quo. ... Cockney rhyming slang (sometimes intitialized as CRS) is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... Hexspeak, like leetspeak, is a novelty form of variant English spelling. ... Pig Latin is a language game primarily used in English. ... StudlyCaps (or perhaps StUdLyCaPs) is a variation of CamelCase in which the individual letters in a word (or many) are capitalized and not capitalized, either at random or alternating in some pattern. ... Volapuk encoding (Russian: кодировка воляпюк or волапюк, kodirovka volapyuk) is a slang term for rendering the letters of the Cyrillic alphabet by the Latin ones. ...

Terminology

Cant is an example of a cryptolect, a characteristic or secret language used only by members of a group, often used to conceal the meaning from those outside the group. ... A pidgin, or contact language, is the name given to any language created, usually spontaneously, out of a mixture of other languages as a means of communication between speakers of different tongues. ... A creole language, or simply a creole, is a well-defined and stable language that originated from a non-trivial combination of two or more languages, typically with many distinctive features that are not inherited from either parent. ... A mixed language is a language that arises when two languages are in contact and there is a high degree of bilingualism among speakers. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... An Idiom is an expression (i. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ...

Tools

References

  1. ^ This appears as (a), an in-joke for technical illustrations(b)(c), and a T-shirt design(d). This Google search finds examples of the two number forms used together on the Web with the name Leet.
  2. ^ PL Meh!. Gamedaily.com (2006-13-09). Retrieved on 2006-01-11.

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Vocabulary

The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Bruce Sterling at the Ars Electronica Festival Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... The Hacker Crackdown: Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier is a book written by science fiction writer Bruce Sterling in 1992. ...

Syntax and structure

  • Jeroen, Kristof (2004). According to a research at Gent University. Retrieved on 19 June 2006.
  • Several publications on "letter position/identity" can be found in the website of. Manuel Perea. Retrieved on 2 September 2006.

June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Evolution, current state, and spread

Internet dialects
v  d  e
Internet slang - 1337 - Greeklish - Arabic Chat Alphabet - Denglisch - Volapuk

  Results from FactBites:
 
Urban Dictionary: leet (1038 words)
Originating in the early 1980's, leet speak was first used by hackers as a way to prevent their websites/newsgroups from being found by simple keyword searches.
Leet speak grew and became popular in online games such as Doom in the early 1990's as a way of suggesting that you were a hacker (h4x0r), and therefore to be feared.
Leet, or 1337, is a short form of "elite," commonly used by video gamers to suggest that they are skilled.
Leet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6539 words)
Leet has become such a part of common culture that the cipher is used even in mainstream advertising, such as the Sears Kenmore "HE4T" washing machine and dryer.
Leet's use as a way of ciphering English words and phrases as strings of punctuation characters can make it useful as a means of creating memorable passwords that such systems will accept.
Pr0n or pron is Leet slang for pornography.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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