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Encyclopedia > Lech, Czech and Rus
Lech by Walery Eljasz-Radzikowski (1841-1905)
Lech by Walery Eljasz-Radzikowski (1841-1905)
"Duke Czech"
Lech, Czech and Rus oaks in Rogalin, Poland
Lech, Czech and Rus oaks in Rogalin, Poland

According to an old legend, Lech, Czech and Rus were eponymous brothers who founded the three Slavic nations: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Radzikowskis CoA Walery Eljasz-Radzikowski (September 13, 1841-March 23, 1905) was a Polish painter. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 885 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Dęby w Rogalinie: Lech, Czech i Rus. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 885 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Dęby w Rogalinie: Lech, Czech i Rus. ... Palace in Rogalin Rogalin is a village in Poland, near Poznań, situated on the Warta river. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ...

In one of the legend's variations, the three brothers went hunting together but each of them followed a different prey and eventually they all traveled in different directions. Rus went to the east, Czech headed to the west to settle on the Říp Mountain rising up from the Bohemian hilly countryside, while Lech traveled to the north until he came across a magnificent white eagle guarding her nest. Startled but impressed by this spectacle, he decided to settle there. He named his settlement (gród) Gniezno (Polish adjective from gniazdo, or "nest") and adopted the White Eagle as his coat-of-arms which remains a symbol of Poland to this day. Lechia is the historical name of Poland, still present in several European languages: Lenkija in Lithuanian, Lengyelorszag in Hungarian, Lehistan in Turkish. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Ruthenia is a name applied to parts of Eastern Europe which were populated by Eastern Slavic peoples, as well as to various states that existed in this territory in the past. ... The word Rus or Rus (Русь in Cyrillic Alphabet) may refer to: the Rus (people) of disputed origin who were at the roots of the statehood of Eastern Slavic peoples; the territories they ruled, also known by the Latinized name, Ruthenia; Kievan Rus, the most powerful of... Říp mountain (  hora Říp? in Czech) is a 459 m solitary hill rising up from the central Bohemian flatland where, according to a legend, the first Czechs settled down. ... Reconstructed gord in Biskupin, Poland although it is not Slavonic gord (it is much older), it is good illustration how gords looked like The ancient Slavs were known for building wooden fortified settlements. ... Gniezno (pronounced: [gɲȋεznÉ”]) is a town in central-western Poland, some 50 km east of PoznaÅ„, inhabited by about 73,000 people. ... Flag of Poland with the coat of arms The Polish coat of arms is regulated by article 28(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of Poland of 1997. ... A coat of arms or armorial bearings (often just arms for short), in European tradition, is a design belonging to a particular person (or group of people) and used by them in a wide variety of ways. ...


Other variations of Lech's name (pronounced [lɛx]) include: Lechus[1], Lachus, Lestus and Leszek. Czech, or Praotec Čech (pronounced [ˈpra.otɛʦ ʧɛx]; Forefather Čech) also comes under the Latin name Bohemus or German Böhm. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


A similar legend (with partly changed names) was also registered in folk tales at two separated locations in Croatia: in the Kajkavian dialect of Krapina in Zagorje (northern Croatia) and in the Chakavian dialect of Poljica on the Adriatic Sea (central Dalmatia). The Croatian variant was described and analysed in detail by S. Sakač in 1940.[2] Location map of Kajkavian Kajkavian (kajkavski) dialect is one of the three dialects of the Croatian language. ... Categories: Geography stubs | Counties of Croatia ... Chakavian (Čakavian, čakavski) dialect is one of the three dialects of Croatian language. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ...

Contents

Legend versus reality

The earliest Polish mention of Lech, Czech and Rus is found in the Chronicle of Greater Poland written in 1295 in Gniezno or Poznań. In Bohemian chronicles, Czech appears on his own or with Lech only; he is first mentioned as Bohemus in Cosmas's chronicle in early 12th century. PoznaÅ„ ( ; full official name: The Capital City of PoznaÅ„, Polish: StoÅ‚eczne Miasto PoznaÅ„ (Latin: , German: , Yiddish: פּױזן Poyzn) is a city in west-central Poland with over 578,900 inhabitants (2002). ... Cosmas Cosmas of Prague (c. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


The legend suggests the common ancestry of the Poles, the Czechs and the Ruthenians (or modern-day Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians) and illustrates the fact that as early as the 13th century, at least three different Slavic peoples were aware of being racially- and linguistically-interrelated, and, indeed, derived from a common root stock. Genetic data may validate[citation needed] this element of the legend (see: Haplogroup R1a1). Ruthenians is a name that has been applied to different ethnic groups at different times; for an explanation of the reasons for this, see Ruthenia. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Distribution of R1a (purple) and R1b (red), after McDonald (2005). ...


The legend also attempts to explain the etymology of these people's ethnonyms: Lechia (another name for Poland), the Czech lands (including Bohemia and Moravia), and Rus' (Ruthenia). In fact, the term "Lechia" derives from the tribe of Lędzianie. See also: Etymology of Rus and derivatives. An ethnonym (Gk. ... Lechia is the historical name of Poland, still present in several European languages: Lenkija in Lithuanian, Lengyelorszag in Hungarian, Lehistan in Turkish. ... Bohemia, Moravia, Austrian Silesia - 1892, then part of Austria-Hungary Bohemia and Moravia-Silesia within Czechoslovakia in 1928 The Czech lands (Czech: ÄŒeské zemÄ›) is an auxiliary term used mainly to describe the combination of Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia. ... Flag of Moravia Moravia (Czech and Slovak: Morava; German: ; Hungarian: ; Polish: ) is a historical region in the east of the Czech RepublicCzechia. ... The word Rus or Rus (Русь in Cyrillic Alphabet) may refer to: the Rus (people) of disputed origin who were at the roots of the statehood of Eastern Slavic peoples; the territories they ruled, also known by the Latinized name, Ruthenia; Kievan Rus, the most powerful of... West Slavic tribes from Bavarian Geographer, 845, Lendizi nr 33 The Lendians, (Polish: LÄ™dzianie) were a Lechitic tribe inhabiting, since at least the 7th century, lands known today as East Lesser Poland and Galicia in Ukraine. ... Originally Rus (Русь, Rus’) was a medieval country and state that comprised mostly Early East Slavs. ...


Oaks of Rogalin

Lech, Czech and Rus are also the names given to three large oaks in the garden adjacent to the palace in Rogalin, Greater Poland. Each of them is more than 700 years old. Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... Palace in Rogalin Rogalin is a village in Poland, near Poznań, situated on the Warta river. ... Voivodship wielkopolskie since 1999 Coat of Arms for voivodship wielkopolskie Greater Poland (also Great Poland; Polish: , German: Großpolen, Latin: Polonia Maior) is a historical region of west-central Poland. ...


References

  1. ^ Reges Et Principes Regni Poloniae Adrian Kochan Wolski; Riksarkivet E 8603; BUV 18.24.1.17 [1] Quote: LECHUS adest, a quo deducta colonia nostra est.
  2. ^ Krapina-Kijev-Ararat, Priča o troje braće i jednoj sestri. Život 21/3: 129–149, Zagreb

Riksarkivet (The Swedish National Archives) is one of the oldest public agencies in Sweden, with a history leading back to the Middle Ages. ...

External links

  • A version of the legend (PDF)
  • Another variant of the legend

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lech, Czech, and Rus at AllExperts (422 words)
Rus went to the east, Czech headed to the west to settle on the Říp Mountain rising up from the Bohemian hilly countryside, while Lech travelled to the north until he came across a magnificent white eagle guarding her nest.
The legend suggests the common ancestry of the Poles, the Czechs and the Ruthenians (or modern-day Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians) and illustrates the fact that as early as the 13th century, at least three different Slavic peoples were aware of being racially- and linguistically-interrelated, and, indeed, derived from a common root stock.
Lech, Czech and Rus are also the names given to three large oaks in the garden adjacent to the palace in Rogalin, Greater Poland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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