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Encyclopedia > Lebanese lira
Lebanese lira
ليرة لبنانية (Arabic)
livre libanaise (French)
Obverse of a 10 lirat banknote Reverse of a 10 lirat banknote
ISO 4217 Code LBP
User(s) Lebanon
Inflation 4.8%
Source The World Factbook, 2006 est.
Pegged with U.S. dollar = 1507.5 lira
Subunit
1/100 piastre
Symbol ل.ل
Coins 50, 100, 250, 500 lira
Banknotes 1000, 5000, 10 000, 20 000, 50 000, 100 000 lira
Central bank Bank of Lebanon
Website www.bdl.gov.lb

The lira (Arabic, ليرة) or livre (French) (English: pound, ISO 4217: "Lebanese pound", LBP) is the currency unit of Lebanon. It is divided into 100 qirsh (Arabic, قرش) or piastres (French) but inflation has eliminated the subdivisions. Image File history File links Lebanese_pound_2. ... Image File history File links Lebanese_pound. ... A fixed exchange rate, sometimes (less commonly) called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... A 100 piastre note from French Indochina, circa 1954. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Qirsh, Gersh and KuruÅŸ are all names for currency denominations in and around the territories formerly part of the Ottoman Empire. ... A 100 piastre note from French Indochina, circa 1954. ...


The plural form of lira, as used on the currency, is either lirat (ليرات) or the same, whilst there are four plural forms for qirsh: qirshan (قرشان), qirush (قروش), qirsha (قرشا) or the same. In both cases, the number determines which plural form is used. Note that before the Second World War, the Arabic spelling of the subdivision was غرش (girsh). All of Lebanon's coins and banknotes are bilingual in Arabic and French. Look up Plural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Plural is a grammatical number, typically referring to more than one of the referent in the real world. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...

Contents

History

Before World War I, the Ottoman lira was used. After the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the currency became the Egyptian pound in 1918. Upon gaining control of Syria and Lebanon, the French replaced the Egyptian pound with a new currency for Syria and Lebanon, the Syrian pound, which was linked to the French franc at a value of 1 pound = 20 francs. Lebanon issued its own coins from 1924 and banknotes from 1925. In 1939, the Lebanese currency was officially separated from that of Syria, though it was still linked to the French franc and remained interchangeable with Syrian money. In 1941, following France's defeat by Nazi Germany, the currency was linked instead to the British pound sterling at a rate of 8.83 lira = 1 pound.[1] A link to the French franc was restored after the war but was abandoned in 1949. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... ISO 4217 Code TRL User(s) Turkey and the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus Subunit 1/100 kuruÅŸ 1/4000 para Symbol TL Coins 5000, 10,000, 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, 250,000 lira Banknotes 250,000, 500,000, 1,000,000, 5,000,000, 10... ISO 4217 Code EGP User(s) Egypt Inflation 4. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... ISO 4217 Code SYP User(s) Syria Subunit 1/100 piastre Symbol S£ [] Coins 1, 2, 5, 10, 25 pounds Banknotes 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000 pounds Central bank Central Bank of Syria Website www. ... ISO 4217 Code FRF User(s) Monaco, Andorra, France except New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and Wallis and Futuna ERM Since 13 March 1979 Fixed rate since 31 December 1998 Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999 Replaced by €, cash 1 January 2002 € = 6. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies Inflation 2. ...


Before the war of 1975-1991, 1 U.S. dollar was worth 3 lirat. According to the central bank's data [2], 1 U.S. dollar has been equal to 1507.5 lira in the entire year 2006. ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...


Coins

Lebanon's first coins were issued in 1924 in denominations of 2 and 5 girush (note the different spelling to post WWII coins) with the French denominations given in "piastres syriennes" (Syrian piastres). Later issues did not include the word "syriennes" and were in denominations of ½, 1, 2, 2½, 5, 10, 25 and 50 girsha. During World War II, rather crude ½, 1 and 2½ girsh coins were issued. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


After the war, the Arabic spelling was changed from girsh (غرش) to qirsh (قرش). Coins were issued in the period 1952 to 1986 in denominations of 1, 2½, 5, 10, 25 and 50 qirsh and 1 lira. No coins were issued between 1986 and 1996, when the current series of coins was introduced. Coins in current use [3] are

  • 250 lira
  • 500 lira

Banknotes

An obsolete 100 lira note

Lebanon's first banknotes were issued by the Bank of Syria and Greater Lebanon (Banque du Syrie et Grand-Liban) in 1925. Denominations ran from 25 girsha through to 100 lira. In 1939, the bank's name was changed to the Bank of Syria and Lebanon. The first 250 lira notes appeared that year. Between 1942 and 1950, the government issued "small change" paper money in denominations of 5, 10, 25 and 50 girsh or qirsh (the change in spelling occurred during these years). After 1945, the Bank of Syria and Lebanon continued to issue paper money for Lebanon but the notes were denominated specifically in "Lebanese lira" (ليرة لبنانية, livres libanaise) to distinguish them from Syrian notes. Notes for 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 lira were issued. In 1964, the Bank of Lebanon took over banknote production. Their notes are denominated in lira and livres. A 250 lira note reappeared in 1978, followed by higher denominations in the 1980s and 90s as inflation drastically reduced the currency's value. Banknotes in current use are Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A £20 Bank of England banknote. ...

  • 1000 lira
  • 5000 lira
  • 10,000 lira
  • 20,000 lira
  • 50,000 lira
  • 100,000 lira
Current LBP exchange rates
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See also

// History The 1975-90 civil war seriously damaged Lebanons economic infrastructure, cut national output by half, and all but ended Lebanons position as a Middle Eastern entrepot and banking hub. ...

References

  • Krause, Chester L. and Clifford Mishler (1991). Standard Catalog of World Coins: 1801-1991, 18th ed., Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-150-1. 
  • Pick, Albert (1994). Standard Catalog of World Paper Money: General Issues, Colin R. Bruce II and Neil Shafer (editors), 7th ed., Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-207-9. 

External links


 
 

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