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Encyclopedia > Leah
Look up Leah, לֵאָה in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
The Vision of Rachel and Leah – Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1899
The Vision of Rachel and LeahDante Gabriel Rossetti, 1899

Leah (Hebrew: לֵאָה, Standard Leʼa Tiberian Lēʼāh ; "Weary; tired") is the first wife of the Hebrew patriarch Jacob and mother of six of the Twelve Tribes of Israel, along with one daughter. She is the daughter of Laban and the older sister of Rachel, Jacob's second (and favored) wife. Jacob was her first cousin, as Jacob's mother Rebekah was Laban's sister. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dante Gabriel Rossetti (May 12, 1828 - April 10, 1882) was an English poet, painter and translator. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... This is a list of the Tribes of Israel. ... Laban (Hebrew: לָבָן, Standard Tiberian  ; White) is the son of Bethuel, brother of Rebekah and the father of Leah and Rachel as described in the Book of Genesis. ... This article is about the Biblical character. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (רִבְקָה Captivating, Enchantingly Beautiful, Noose or Snare, Standard Hebrew Rivqa, Tiberian Hebrew Riḇqāh) is the wife of Isaac. ...

Contents

Appearance

Leah is described as having "tender eyes" (Hebrew: ועיני לאה רכות) when she is first introduced (Genesis 29:16-17). It is debated as to whether the adjective "tender" (רכות) should be taken to mean "delicate and soft" or "weak." Some translations say that it may have meant blue or light colored eyes.[1] According to Rabbi Shlomo Yitzhaqi (Rashi), Leah was destined to marry Jacob's twin brother, Esau. Her eyes were tender from crying because God hated Esau, and Leah wanted to serve God. Her sister, Rachel, meanwhile, is characterized as being "beautiful of form and beautiful of appearance." Hebrew redirects here. ...


Personal history

Marriage to Jacob

Leah becomes Jacob's wife through a deception on the part of her father, Laban. In the Biblical account, Jacob travels to the hometown of Laban —the brother of his mother Rebekah — sent by his mother, to avoid being killed by his brother Esau, and possibly to find a wife. Out by the well, he encounters Laban's younger daughter Rachel tending her father's sheep, and decides to marry her. He proceeds to work seven years for Laban in order to marry Rachel, but on the wedding night, Laban switches Rachel for Leah. Later Laban claims that it is uncustomary to give the younger daughter away in marriage before the older one (Genesis 29:16-30). Laban offers to give Rachel to Jacob in marriage in return for another seven years of work (Genesis 29:27). Jacob accepts the offer and marries Rachel after the week-long celebration of his marriage to Leah. According to Rabbi Shlomo Yitzhaqi (Rashi), Leah was destined to marry Jacob's twin brother, Esau. The two brothers were polar opposites; Jacob being a God-fearing scholar and Esau being a hunter who also indulged in murder, idolatry and adultery. But people would say, "Laban has two daughters and his sister, Rebekah, has two sons. The older daughter (Leah) will marry the older son (Esau), and the younger daughter (Rachel) will marry the younger son (Jacob)."[2] Hearing this, Leah spent most of her time weeping and praying to God to change her destined mate. Thus the Torah describes her eyes as "soft" from weeping.[3] Hearkening to her tears and prayers, God allows her to marry Jacob even before Rachel does. Laban (Hebrew: לָבָן, Standard Tiberian  ; White) is the son of Bethuel, brother of Rebekah and the father of Leah and Rachel as described in the Book of Genesis. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (רִבְקָה Captivating, Enchantingly Beautiful, Noose or Snare, Standard Hebrew Rivqa, Tiberian Hebrew Riḇqāh) is the wife of Isaac. ... Esaw redirects here. ... This article is about the Biblical character. ... A 16th-century depiction of Rashi Note: For the astrological concept, see Rashi - the signs. ... Esaw redirects here. ...


Motherhood

In the early years of the sisters' marriage, it is obvious that Jacob loves Rachel more than Leah.[3] To increase Jacob's love for his first wife, God opens Leah's womb and she conceives four sons in quick succession. These are Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah (Genesis 29:31-35). Seeing that she is unable to conceive, Rachel offers her handmaid Bilhah as a third wife to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Dan and Naphtali) that Bilhah bears. Leah responds by offering her handmaid Zilpah as a fourth wife to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Gad and Asher) that Zilpah bears. According to some commentaries, Bilhah and Zilpah were actually half-sisters of Leah and Rachel.[4] Reuben (רְאוּבֵן, Standard Hebrew Rəʾuven, Tiberian Hebrew Rəʾûḇēn) is the first-born son of Jacob and the founder of the Tribe of Reuben, as related in the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Bible. ... Simeon, Symeon, or Shimon is a Hebrew name (שִׁמְעוֹן) meaning hearkening; listening, pronounced in Biblical Hebrew Å imÊ¿on, Tiberian Hebrew Å imʿôn. ... This article discusses the Biblical patriarch. ... In Genesis (the first book of the Bible) Judah (יְהוּדָה Praise, Standard Hebrew YÉ™huda, Tiberian Hebrew YÉ™hûḏāh) is the fourth son of Jacob and Leah, born in Padan-aram (Genesis xxix. ... In the Book of Genesis, Bilhah (בִּלְהָה Faltering; bashful, Standard Hebrew Bilha, Tiberian Hebrew Bilhāh) is a concubine of Jacob, and bears him two sons, Dan and Naphtali. ... Look up Dan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Naphtali (Hebrew: נַפְתָּלִי, Standard Tiberian  ; My struggle) is the sixth son of Jacob and the founder of the tribe of Naphtali, first mentioned in the Book of Genesis and as described in the Hebrew Bible. ... In the Book of Genesis, Zilpah (זִלְפָּה Drooping, Standard Hebrew Zilpa, Tiberian Hebrew Zilpāh) is a concubine of Jacob and the mother of Gad and Asher. ... Gad can refer to: Gad (see Gad Guard), a metallic cube artifact that figures prominantly in the anime Gad Guard Gad (Bible character), the sixth son of Jacob as related in Genesis 29 - 30 Tribe of Gad, one of the Hebrew tribes founded by Gad GAD as a three-letter... In the Book of Genesis, Asher (אָשֵׁר, Standard Hebrew AÅ¡er, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĀšēr) is a son of Jacob and Zilpah, and the founder of the Tribe of Asher. ...


One day, Leah's firstborn son Reuben returns from the field with mandrakes for his mother. Leah has not conceived for a while, and this plant, whose roots resemble the human body, was thought to be an aid to fertility.[5] Frustrated that she is not able to conceive at all, Rachel offers to trade her night with their husband in return for the mandrakes. Leah agrees, and that night she conceives Issachar. Afterwards she gives birth to Zebulun and to a daughter, Dinah. After that, God remembers Rachel and gives her two sons, Joseph and Benjamin. Mandrake root redirects here. ... Issachar or Yissachar (יִשָּׂשׁכָר Reward; recompense, Standard Hebrew Yissaḫar, Tiberian Hebrew Yiśśâḵār) was the fifth son of Jacob and his first wife Leah. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... For other uses, see Benjamin (disambiguation). ...


Rivalry with Rachel

On a homiletical level, the classic Chassidic texts explain the sisters' rivalry as more than marital jealousy. Each woman desired to grow spiritually in her avodat Hashem (service of God), and therefore sought closeness to the tzadik (Jacob) who is God's personal emissary in this world. By marrying Jacob and bearing his sons, who would be raised in the tzadik's home and continue his mission into the next generation (indeed, all 12 sons became tzadikim in their own right and formed the foundation of the Nation of Israel), they would develop an even closer relationship to God. Therefore Leah and Rachel each wanted to have as many of those sons as possible, going so far as to offer their handmaids as wives to Jacob so they could have a share in the upbringing of their handmaids' sons, too.[6] This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article is about the Hasidic movement originating in Poland and Russia. ... Tzadik - צדיק (plural: Tzadikkim) is the Hebrew word for righteous one, and is a title which is generally given to those whom are considered to be righteous such as a spiritual master or Rebbe. ...


Each woman also continually questioned whether she was doing enough in her personal efforts toward increased spirituality, and would use the other's example to spur herself on. Rachel envied Leah's tearful prayers, by which she merited to marry the tzadik and bear six of his twelve sons.[6][4] The Talmud - Gemarah Megillah - says that Rachel even revealed to Leah the secret signs which she and Jacob had devised to identify the veiled bride, because they both suspected Laban would pull such a trick.[7] The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ...


Death and burial

Leah died some time after Jacob returned with his family to the land of Canaan. She is traditionally thought to be buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron along with her husband, Jacob, Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah.[8] // [[Image:]] Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... The Enclosure of the Cave of the Patriarchs The Cave of the Patriarchs is a religious compound located in the ancient city of Hebron (which lies in the southwest part of the West Bank, in the heart of ancient Judea), and is generally considered by Jews, Christians, and Muslims, to... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea... Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Engraving of Sarah by Hans Collaert from c. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (רִבְקָה Captivating, Enchantingly Beautiful, Noose or Snare, Standard Hebrew Rivqa, Tiberian Hebrew Riḇqāh) is the wife of Isaac. ...


Leah's offspring

God fulfills His covenant to Abraham through Leah's descendants. Her son Judah becomes the effective leader among the sons of Jacob and the father of the pre-eminent tribe in the nation of Israel.[9] All the kings of Israel (save for the Hasmonean dynasty) come from Judah, most notably King David. According to Jewish tradition, King David's future offspring will be the Messiah.[10] Christians believe that this messianic descendant was already born in the person of Jesus.[11] Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... In Genesis (the first book of the Bible) Judah (יְהוּדָה Praise, Standard Hebrew YÉ™huda, Tiberian Hebrew YÉ™hûḏāh) is the fourth son of Jacob and Leah, born in Padan-aram (Genesis xxix. ... The Hasmoneans (Hebrew: , Hashmonaiym, Audio) were the ruling dynasty of the Hasmonean Kingdom (140 BCE–37 BCE),[1] an autonomous Jewish state in ancient Israel. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Rachel's son, Joseph, is destined to be the interim leader who bridges the gap between exile and nationhood. This is exemplified in the Biblical story of Joseph, who prepared the way in Egypt for his family's exile there,[12] and in the future figure of Mashiach ben Yosef (Messiah, son of Joseph), who will fight the apocalyptic Wars of Gog and Magog, preparing the way for the kingship of Mashiach ben David (Messiah, son of David) and the messianic age.[13][14] Gog and Magog redirect here. ...


Leah as a modern name

Leah is in current use as a name among Jews and non-Jews alike.[15] Spellings vary among Leah, Lea, Lia, Leigha, Liija, and a few others.


References

  1. ^ Bivin, David, "Leah's Tender Eyes," at jerusalemperspective.com
  2. ^ "What's in A Name," Vayetzei (Genesis 28:10-32:3) at aish.com
  3. ^ a b Reardon, Patrick, "Leah the Unloved: Patrick Reardon on Jacob's Other Wife," at trushare.com
  4. ^ a b Ginzberg, Louis (1909) The Legends of the Jews, Volume I, Chapter VI: Jacob, at sacred-texts.com
  5. ^ Mandrake in the American Bible Society Online Bible Dictionary, 1865, Broadway, New York, NY 10023-7505 at www.bibles.com
  6. ^ a b Feinhandler, Yisrael Pesach, Beloved Companions, Vayetze - III, "Jealousy Can Be a Tool for Spiritual Growth," at shemayisrael.com
  7. ^ Wagensberg, Abba (2006), "Between The Lines," in Toras Aish, Volume XIV, No. 11, © 2006 Rabbi A. Wagensberg & aish.com
  8. ^ Richman, Chaim (1995), "Focus on Hebron," © 1995 Light to the Nations, Rabbi Chaim Richman - All Rights Reserved, Reprinted from The Restoration newsletter, July, 1995 (Tammuz/Av, 5755) at lttn.org
  9. ^ Judah at jewishencyclopedia.com
  10. ^ Messiah at jewishencyclopedia.com
  11. ^ Bell, Bernard (1999), "Jesus Christ, Son of David, Son of Abraham," © 1999 Peninsula Bible Church Cupertino
  12. ^ Joseph at jewishencyclopedia.com
  13. ^ Davidiy, Yair, "Moshiach Ben Yoseph," at britam.org
  14. ^ "The Messiah of Judaism," at truthnet.org
  15. ^ "Top 10 baby names around the world," at the BabyCenter website

/.. This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Reuben (רְאוּבֵן, Standard Hebrew Rəʾuven, Tiberian Hebrew Rəʾûḇēn) is the first-born son of Jacob and the founder of the Tribe of Reuben, as related in the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Bible. ... Simeon (Hebrew: שִׁמְעוֹן, ) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon; however Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation... This article discusses the Biblical patriarch. ... Judah/Yehuda (Hebrew: יְהוּדָה, Standard YÉ™huda Tiberian ) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the fourth son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Judah; however Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to... Issachar or Yissachar (יִשָּׂשׁכָר Reward; recompense, Standard Hebrew Yissaḫar, Tiberian Hebrew Yiśśâḵār) was the fifth son of Jacob and his first wife Leah. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... This article is about the Biblical character. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... For other uses, see Benjamin (disambiguation). ... In the Book of Genesis, Bilhah (בִּלְהָה Faltering; bashful, Standard Hebrew Bilha, Tiberian Hebrew Bilhāh) is a concubine of Jacob, and bears him two sons, Dan and Naphtali. ... Dan (Hebrew: דָּן, Standard Dan Tiberian Dān; Judge) was, according to the Book of Genesis, a son of Jacob and Bilhah (the first son of Bilhah, but the fifth son of Jacob), and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Dan[1]; however Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an... Naphtali (Hebrew: נַפְתָּלִי, Standard Tiberian  ; My struggle) is the sixth son of Jacob and the founder of the tribe of Naphtali, first mentioned in the Book of Genesis and as described in the Hebrew Bible. ... In the Book of Genesis, Zilpah (זִלְפָּה Drooping, Standard Hebrew Zilpa, Tiberian Hebrew Zilpāh) is a concubine of Jacob and the mother of Gad and Asher. ... Gad (Hebrew: גד ; luck) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the first son of Jacob and Zilpah, the seventh of Jacob overall, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Gad; however Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe... Asher (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), was, according to the Book of Genesis, the second son of Jacob and Zilpah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Asher; however Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Leah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (985 words)
Leah responds by offering her handmaid Zilpah as a fourth wife to Jacob, and names and raises the two sons (Gad and Asher) that Zilpah bears.
Leah envied Rachel's traits of humility and acquiescence, which were displayed when she saw Laban bringing Leah in marriage to Jacob instead of herself, yet remained silent.
Leah is traditionally thought to be buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron along with her husband, Jacob, Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah.
Leah (494 words)
The biblical matriarch Leah was the wife of Jacob and the mother of six of the twelve tribes: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar and Zebulun.
Leah was the oldest daughter of Laban, Rebekah’s brother.
Leah left as her legacy half of the 12 tribes, including Judah, father of the monarchy, and Levi, father of the priesthood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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