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Encyclopedia > Le Figaro
Front page
Type Daily newspaper
Format Berliner

Owner Socpresse
Editor Nicolas Beytout
Founded 15 January 1826
as a daily newspaper:
16 November 1866
Political allegiance Right-wing
Language French
Headquarters 14 Boulevard Haussman
F-75009 Paris

Website: www.lefigaro.fr

Le Figaro (English: The Barber) is one of the leading French morning daily newspapers. Its editorial line is conservative and has generally been supportive of the Rally for the Republic political party and its successor, the Union for a Popular Movement. Its circulation was 342,445 in 2005 (365,682 in 2002). Image File history File links Le_Figaro_logo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (466x713, 351 KB) Le Figaros cover (french newspaper) This image is of a scan of a newspaper page or article, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the newspaper or the individual contributors... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... Socpresse is a French group which control conservative daily Le Figaro, as well as LExpress and Valeurs Actuelles, and the football club FC Nantes Atlantique. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Conservatism is a political philosophy that usually favors traditional values and strong foreign defense. ... The Rally for the Republic, also known by its French acronym RPR (Rassemblement pour la République), was a French political party. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire, UMP), initially named the Union for the Presidential Majority (Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle), is the main French conservative political party. ...


The Parisian paper was founded as a satirical weekly in 1826, taking its name and motto from Le Mariage de Figaro, a play by Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais. (The motto, "Sans la liberté de blâmer, il n'est point d'éloge flatteur" translates as "Without the freedom to criticise, there is no true praise".) It was published somewhat irregularly until 1854, when it was taken over by Hippolyte de Villemessant. By 1866 it had gained the greatest circulation of any newspaper in France; its first daily edition, that of 16 November 1866 sold 56,000 copies. Albert Wolff, Émile Zola, Alphonse Karr and Jules Claretie were among the paper's early contributors. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The Marriage of Figaro (French: Le Mariage de Figaro or La Folle Journée) is a comedy in five acts, by Pierre Beaumarchais written in 1778. ... Beaumarchais Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais (January 24, 1732 - May 18, 1799) was, among other accomplishments, a writer and librettist. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Albert Wolff is a European conductor and Dutch parentage. ... Émile Zola Émile Zola (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French novelist, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. ... Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr (November 24, 1808 - September 29, 1890), French critic, journalist and novelist. ... Jules Arsène Arnaud Claretie (December 3, 1840 - December 23, 1913), was a French literary figure and director of the Théâtre Français. ...


On March 16, 1914, Gaston Calmette, the editor of Le Figaro, was assassinated by Henriette Caillaux, the wife of a former Prime Minister of France after he published a letter that cast serious doubt on her husband's integrity.[1] March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in leap years). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Gaston Calmette (born 1858 in Montpellier; died March 16, 1914, Paris) was a French journalist. ... Henriette Caillaux (1874-1943) was a Parisian socialite and wife of the former Prime Minister of France who is remembered as an assassin. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ...


By the start of World War II, Le Figaro had become France's leading newspaper. After the war it became the voice of the upper middle class, and continues to maintain a conservative position. Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... This graph shows the American definition of social class according to the New York Times using the quintiles as measurement for class. ...


In 1922 Le Figaro was purchased by perfume millionaire François Coty.[2] In 1975 Le Figaro was bought by Robert Hersant. In 1999 the Carlyle Group obtained a 40% stake in the paper, which it later sold in March of 2002. As of 2004, Le Figaro is controlled by Serge Dassault, a conservative businessman and politician best known for running the aircraft manufacturer Dassault Aviation. The ownership of a major national newspaper by a person who also controls a major military supplier, as well as being a mayor and senator from the ruling UMP party, and whose son Olivier Dassault is a member of the French National Assembly for the same party, was highly controversial inside and outside the newspaper.[3] In response, Dassault remarked in an interview on the public radio station France Inter,[4] that "newspapers must promulgate healthy ideas", and that "left-wing ideas are not healthy ideas." François Coty (May 3, 1874 – July 25, 1934) was a French perfume manufacturer and the founder of the right-wing paramilitary group Solidarité Française. ... Robert Hersant (January 30, 1920 - April 21, 1996) was a French newspaper magnate with right-wing political views. ... The Carlyle Group is a Washington, D.C. based global private equity investment firm with at least $44. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serge Dassault (born 4 April 1925) is a French entrepreneur and conservative politician. ... Dassault Aviation is a French aircraft manufacturer of military, regional and business jets. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Senate amphitheater in the Luxembourg Palace The Senate (in French :le Sénat) is the upper house of the Parliament of France. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire, UMP), initially named the Union for the Presidential Majority (Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle), is the main French conservative political party. ... Olivier Dassault (born 1 June 1951 in Boulogne-Billancourt) is a French politician, currently serving as a deputy in the French National Assembly. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... France Inter is the major French public radio network. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Article published in L'Express on 30 August 2004 Retrieved on 27 January 2007.
  2. ^ Hippolyta (3 May 1930) The New Yorker. Republished on 7 May 2005. Retrieved on 27 January 2007.
  3. ^ Article published in Le Figaro on 1 October 2004 Retrieved on 27 January 2007.
  4. ^ Article published in Le Figaro 12 December 2004 Retrieved on 27 January 2007.

See also

The following is a list of newspapers, divided by country and region. ... Le Monde is also the name of a song by the Thievery Corporation. ... Libération (affectionately known as Libé) is a French newspaper founded in Paris in 1973 by Jean-Paul Sartre, Pierre Victor alias Benny Lévy and Serge July in the wake of the protest movements of May 1968. ...

External links

  • Le Figaro website.
  • Le Figaro Group Masthead.
  • Media profile of Le Figaro and Hersant.
  • The Carlyle Group's explanation of its relationship with Le Figaro
  • OJD Sheet

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Marriage of Figaro - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2000 words)
The Marriage of Figaro (Italian: Le nozze di Figaro) is an opera buffa (comic opera) composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Beaumarchais, Le mariage de Figaro (1784).
Figaro arrives and hatches a plan to trick the Count: Susanna will give him a note indicating she wants to meet him that night in the garden; Cherubino will be waiting there, dressed as a woman; and the Countess will arrive and catch him red-handed.
Figaro's trial follows, during the confusing course of it it is adduced that Figaro is the long-lost illegitimate son of Bartolo and Marcellina.
Le Figaro - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (400 words)
Le Figaro is one of the leading French morning daily newspapers.
On March 16, 1914, Gaston Calmette, the editor of Le Figaro, was assassinated by Henriette Caillaux, the wife of a former Prime Minister of France after he published a letter that cast serious doubt on her husband's integrity.
As of 2004, Le Figaro is controlled by Serge Dassault, a conservative businessman and politician best known for running the aircraft manufacturer Dassault Aviation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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