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Encyclopedia > Laxative

Laxatives (or purgatives) are foods, compounds, or drugs taken to induce bowel movements or to loosen the stool, most often taken to treat constipation. Certain stimulant, lubricant, and saline laxatives are used to evacuate the colon for rectal and bowel examinations, and may be supplemented by enemas in that circumstance. Sufficiently high doses of laxatives will cause diarrhea. Laxatives only work to hasten the elimination of undigested remains of food in the large intestine and colon.[citation needed] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Constipation or irregularity, is a condition of the digestive system where a person (or animal) experiences hard feces that are difficult to egest; it may be extremely painful, and in severe cases (fecal impaction) lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Large intestine. ... The rectum (from the Latin rectum intestinum, meaning straight intestine) is the final straight portion of the large intestine in some mammals, and the gut in others, terminating in the anus. ... This 2qt (about 1. ... Diarrhea, also spelled diarrhoea (see spelling differences), is a condition in which the sufferer has frequent watery, loose bowel movements (from the Greek word διάρροια; literally meaning through-flowing). Acute infectious diarrhea is a common cause of death in developing countries (particularly among infants), accounting for 5 to 8 million deaths... The large intestine, an organ which is now more commonly referred to by its Greek name, the colon, is the last part of the digestive system: the final stage of the alimentary canal in vertebrate animals. ... Colon has several meanings: colon (anatomy) colon (punctuation) colon (rhetoric) See also Colón This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


There are several types of laxatives, listed below. Some laxatives combine more than one type of active ingredient to produce a combination of the effects mentioned. Laxatives may be oral or in suppository form. In pharmacology and toxicology, a route of administration is the path by which a drug, fluid, poison or other substance is brought into contact with the body 1. ... Suppository casting mould A suppository is a drug delivery system that is inserted either into the rectum (rectal suppository), vagina (vaginal suppository) or urethra (urethral suppository) where it dissolves. ...


Constipation with no known organic cause, i.e. no medical explanation, exhibits gender differences in prevalence: females are more often affected than males.[1] Not surprisingly, some advertisers promote their brands as being more feminine and thereby tailor their message to the market. The way laxatives function in males and females, however, does not exhibit significant differences. An explanation is a statement which points to causes, context, and consequences of some object, process, state of affairs, etc. ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... In epidemiology, the prevalence of a disease in a statistical population is defined as the total number of cases of the disease in the population at a given time, or the total number of cases in the population, divided by the number of individuals in the population. ...

Contents

Bulk-producing agents

Also known as bulking agents or roughage, these include dietary fiber. Bulk-Producing agents cause the stool to be bulkier and to retain more water, as well as forming an emollient gel, making it easier for peristaltic action to move it along. They should be taken with plenty of water. Bulk-producing agents have the gentlest of effects among laxatives and can be taken just for maintaining regular bowel movements. Psyllium or Ispaghula is the common name used for several members of the plant genus Plantago whose seeds are used commercially for the production of mucilage. ... Metamucil is a bulk-producing laxative and fiber supplement manufactured by Procter & Gamble. ... Polycarbophil, also Calcium Polycarbophil is the International Nonproprietary Name of a synthetic polymer the calcium salt of polyacrylic acid cross-linked with divynyl glycol. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... Species Malus domestica Malus sieversii Apple is the fruit (pome) of the genus Malus belonging to the family Rosaceae, and is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... Emollients soften skin (and moisturisers add moisture). ... Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents through the digestive tract. ...


Stool softeners / Surfactants

  • Site of Action: Small and large intestine
  • Onset of Action: 12 - 72 hours
  • Examples: docusate (Colace, Diocto)

These cause water & fats to penetrate the stool, making it easier to move along. Many of these quickly produce a tolerance effect and so become ineffective with prolonged use. Their strength is between that of the bulk producers and the stimulants, and they can be used for patients with occasional constipation or those with anorectal conditions for whom passage of a firm stool is painful. Docusate (DAH cue sate) is the generic name of a surfactant used as a laxative and stool softener, which is sold in the U.S. under the brand names: Aqualax, Calube, Colace, Colace Micro-Enema, Correctol Softgel Extra Gentle, DC-240, Dialose, Diocto, Dioctocal, Dioctosoftez, Dioctyn, Dionex, Doc-Q-Lace... Constipation or irregularity, is a condition of the digestive system where a person (or animal) experiences hard feces that are difficult to egest; it may be extremely painful, and in severe cases (fecal impaction) lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction. ...


Lubricants / Emollient

  • Site of Action: Colon
  • Onset of Action: 6 - 8 hours

These simply make the stool slippery, so that it slides through the intestine more easily. An example is mineral oil, which also retards colonic absorption of water, softening the stool. Mineral oil may decrease the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K). Mineral oil or liquid petrolatum is a by-product in the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline. ... Retinol (one vitamer of Vitamin A) A vitamin is an organic compound required as a nutrient in tiny amounts by an organism. ...


Hydrating agents (osmotics)

These cause the intestines to hold more water within, softening the stool. There are two principal types, saline and hyperosmotic.


Saline

Saline laxatives attract and retain water in the intestinal lumen, increasing intraluminal pressure and thus softening the stool. They will also cause the release of cholecystokinin, which stimulates the digestion of fat and protein. Saline laxatives may alter a patient's fluid and electrolyte balance. Sodium phosphate (Na3PO4) is a phosphate of sodium. ... Magnesium citrate is a chemical agent used medicinally as a laxative and to empty the bowel prior to a surgery or colonoscopy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Milk of Magnesia. ... Milk of Magnesia, or Magnesium Hydroxide, Mg(OH)2 is a saline osmotic (hydrating) laxative. ... Magnesium sulfate (or sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium and sulfate, with the formula MgSO4. ... Magnesium sulfate (commonly called Epsom salts in hydrated form) is a chemical compound with the formula MgSO4·7H2O. Origin Epsom salt was originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters at Epsom, England and afterwards prepared from sea water. ... Cholecystokinin (from Greek chole, bile; cysto, sac; kinin, move; hence, move the bile-sac (gall bladder)) is a peptide hormone of the gastrointestinal system responsible for stimulating the digestion of fat and protein. ...


Sulfate salts are considered the most potent.[citation needed]


Hyperosmotic agents

Lactulose works by the osmotic effect, which retains water in the colon, lowering the pH and increasing colonic peristalsis. Lactulose is also indicated in Portal-systemic encephalopathy. Glycerin suppositories work mostly by hyperosmotic action, but also the sodium stearate in the preparation causes local irritation to the colon. Glycerin, also well known as glycerine and glycerol, and less commonly as 1,2,3-propanetriol, 1,2,3-trihydroxypropane, glyceritol, and glycyl alcohol is a colorless, odorless, hygroscopic, and sweet-tasting viscous liquid. ... A suppository is a medicine that is inserted either into the rectum (rectal suppository) or into the vagina (vaginal suppository) where it melts. ... Sorbitol, also known as glucitol, is a sugar alcohol the body metabolises slowly. ... Lactulose is a synthetic sugar used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy, a complication of liver disease. ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) are polymers composed of repeating subunits of identical structure, called monomers, and are the most commercially important polyethers. ... For other uses, see PH (disambiguation). ... Hepatic encephalopathy is a potentially reversible neuropsychiatic abnormality in the setting of liver failure, whether chronic (as in cirrhosis), or acutely. ... Glycerin, also well known as glycerine and glycerol, and less commonly as 1,2,3-propanetriol, 1,2,3-trihydroxypropane, glyceritol, and glycyl alcohol is a colorless, odorless, hygroscopic, and sweet-tasting viscous liquid. ...


Solutions of polyethylene glycol and electrolytes (sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium chloride, and sometimes sodium sulfate) are used for whole bowel irrigation, a process designed to prepare the bowel for surgery or colonoscopy and to treat certain types of poisoning. Brand names for these solutions include GoLytely, GlycoLax, CoLyte, NuLytely, and others. R-phrases 36 S-phrases none Flash point Non-flammable Related Compounds Other anions NaF, NaBr, NaI Other cations LiCl, KCl, RbCl, CsCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 Related salts Sodium acetate Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... Flash point Non-flammable. ... The chemical compound potassium chloride (KCl) is a metal halide composed of potassium and chlorine. ... Sodium sulfate is an important compound of sodium. ... Whole bowel irrigation (WBI) is a medical process involving the rapid administration of large volumes of an osmotically balanced polyethylene glycol solution (GoLYTELY®, CoLyte®), either orally or via a nasogastric tube, to flush out the entire gastrointestinal tract. ... Colonoscopy is the minimally invasive endoscopic examination of the large colon and the distal part of the small bowel with a CCD camera or a fiber optic camera on a flexible tube passed through the anus. ... For biological toxicity, see toxin and poison. ...


Effectiveness

For adults, a randomized controlled trial found PEG [MiraLax or GlycoLax] 17 grams once per day better than tegaserod 6 mg twice per day.[2] A randomized controlled trial found greater improvement from 2 sachets (26 grams) of PEG versus or 2 sachets (20 grams) of lactulose [3]. 17 grams/day of PEG has been effective and safe in a randomized controlled trial for six months.[4] Another randomized controlled trial found no difference between sorbitol and lactulose [5]. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a form of clinical trial, or scientific procedure used in the testing of the efficacy of medicines or medical procedures. ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) are polymers composed of repeating subunits of identical structure, called monomers, and are the most commercially important polyethers. ... Tegaserod is a 5-HT4 agonist used for the management of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). ... A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a form of clinical trial, or scientific procedure used in the testing of the efficacy of medicines or medical procedures. ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) are polymers composed of repeating subunits of identical structure, called monomers, and are the most commercially important polyethers. ... Lactulose is a synthetic sugar used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy, a complication of liver disease. ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) are polymers composed of repeating subunits of identical structure, called monomers, and are the most commercially important polyethers. ... A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a form of clinical trial, or scientific procedure used in the testing of the efficacy of medicines or medical procedures. ... A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a form of clinical trial, or scientific procedure used in the testing of the efficacy of medicines or medical procedures. ... Sorbitol, also known as glucitol, is a sugar alcohol the body metabolises slowly. ... Lactulose is a synthetic sugar used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy, a complication of liver disease. ...


For children, PEG was found to be more effective than lactulose.[6] Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) are polymers composed of repeating subunits of identical structure, called monomers, and are the most commercially important polyethers. ... Lactulose is a synthetic sugar used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy, a complication of liver disease. ...


Stimulant / Irritant

  • Site of Action: Colon
  • Examples:
Onset of Action Laxative Name
6 - 8 hours Cascara
Phenolphthalein (Formerly in Ex-lax but phased out because of carcinogenicity concerns)
6 - 10 hours Bisacodyl tablets (Dulcolax)
Casanthranol
Senna (Ex-lax)
Aloe Vera
2 - 6 hours Castor oil
15 min - 1 hour Bisacodyl suppository

Microlax Species See text The Buckthorns Rhamnus are a genus (or two genera, if Frangula is treated as distinct) of about 100 species of shrubs or small trees from 1-10 m tall (rarely to 15 m), in the buckthorn family Rhamnaceae. ... Phenolphthalein is a sensitive chemical with the formula C20H14O4 (often written as HIn in shorthand notation). ... In pathology, a carcinogen is any substance or agent that promotes cancer. ... Bisacodyl is the International Nonproprietary Name of a compound that functions as a stimulant laxative. ... Senna is the common name for many species in the genera Senna and Cassia, both in the family Fabaceae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae. ... Binomial name (L.) Burm. ... Castor oil is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor bean (technically castor seed as the castor plant, Ricinus communis, is not a member of the bean family). ... Bisacodyl is the International Nonproprietary Name of a compound that functions as a stimulant laxative. ... Suppository casting mould A suppository is a drug delivery system that is inserted either into the rectum (rectal suppository), vagina (vaginal suppository) or urethra (urethral suppository) where it dissolves. ...

These stimulate peristaltic action and can be dangerous under certain circumstances. Long term use can lead to 'cathartic colon'.[7] Stimulant laxatives act on the intestinal mucosa, or nerve plexus; they also alter water and electrolyte secretion. They are the most severe among laxatives and should be used only in extreme conditions. Castor oil may be preferred when more complete evacuation is required. Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents through the digestive tract. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosa) are linings of ectodermic origin, covered in epithelium, that line various body cavities and internal organs. ... An electrolyte is a substance containing free ions that behaves as an electrically conductive medium. ... Castor oil is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor bean (technically castor seed as the castor plant, Ricinus communis, is not a member of the bean family). ...


Castor oil

  • Site of Action: Small intestine

Castor oil acts directly on intestinal mucosa or nerve plexus and alters water and electrolyte secretion. It is converted into ricinoleic acid (the active component) in the gut. Castor oil is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor bean (technically castor seed as the castor plant, Ricinus communis, is not a member of the bean family). ...


Serotonin agonist

Tegaserod is a motility stimulant that works through activation of 5-HT4 receptors of the enteric nervous system in the gastrointestinal tract. However caution must be taken due to potentially harmful cardiovascular side-effects. Tegaserod is a 5-HT4 agonist used for the management of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). ... For the professional wrestling stable, see Ravens Nest#Serotonin. ... The enteric nervous system (ENS) is an interdependent part of the autonomic nervous system. ... Gut redirects here. ...


Uses

Bowel Prep. Chronic constipation. Chronic immobility.


Problems with use

Laxative Abuse

They will have no direct effect on a person's weight, because they do not work on the digestive system between the mouth and the small intestine where food is absorbed. Laxative abuse is potentially serious since it can lead to intestinal paralysis,[citation needed] Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS),[citation needed] pancreatitis,[citation needed] renal failure,[8][9] and other problems. For other uses, see Mouth (disambiguation). ... In biology the small intestine is the part of the gastrointestinal tract (gut) between the stomach and the large intestine and includes the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. ... The intestine is the portion of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine. ... In gastroenterology, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or spastic colon is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits which are not associated with any abnormalities seen on routine clinical testing. ... Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. ... Renal failure or kidney failure is a situation in which the kidneys fail to function adequately. ...


Laxative gut

Physicians generally warn against the chronic use of stimulant laxatives due to concern that chronic use causes the colonic tissues to get worn out over time and not be able to expel feces due to long term overstimulation. The evidence for this was never too strong, and it was always unclear whether the elongated and poorly moving colon of a patient with chronic constipation was a result of or was just a cause for patients use of stimulant laxatives. A common finding in patients who have used stimulant laxatives is a brown pigment deposited in the intestinal tissue, known as Melanosis coli. Melanosis coli identified on colonoscopy as a brownish moire pattern on the wall of the colon. ...


Eating Disorders

Laxatives are often used by people with an eating disorder. In many cases of Bulimia Nervosa the patient will abuse laxatives in an attempt to purge themselves of food in the intestines before it becomes digested. Frequently, patients with eating disorders had chronic digestive problems in childhood and found laxatives an effective treatment. The laxative use later may substitute of more appropriate treatment such as a better diet. Treatment of patients with eating disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses can be challenging.


References

  1. ^ Chang L, Toner B, Fukudo S, Guthrie E, Locke G, Norton N, Sperber A (2006). "Gender, age, society, culture, and the patient's perspective in the functional gastrointestinal disorders". Gastroenterology 130 (5): 1435-46. PMID 16678557. 
  2. ^ Di Palma JA, Cleveland MV, McGowan J, Herrera JL (2007). "A randomized, multicenter comparison of polyethylene glycol laxative and tegaserod in treatment of patients with chronic constipation". Am. J. Gastroenterol. 102 (9): 1964–71. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2007.01365.x. PMID 17573794. 
  3. ^ Attar A, Lémann M, Ferguson A, Halphen M, Boutron M, Flourié B, Alix E, Salmeron M, Guillemot F, Chaussade S, Ménard A, Moreau J, Naudin G, Barthet M (1999). "Comparison of a low dose polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution with lactulose for treatment of chronic constipation.". Gut 44 (2): 226-30. PMID 9895382. 
  4. ^ Dipalma JA, Cleveland MV, McGowan J, Herrera JL (2007). "A randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial of polyethylene glycol laxative for chronic treatment of chronic constipation". Am. J. Gastroenterol. 102 (7): 1436-41. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2007.01199.x. PMID 17403074. 
  5. ^ Lederle F, Busch D, Mattox K, West M, Aske D (1990). "Cost-effective treatment of constipation in the elderly: a randomized double-blind comparison of sorbitol and lactulose.". Am J Med 89 (5): 597-601. PMID 2122724. 
  6. ^ BestBETs: Is polyethylene glycol safe and effective for chro.... Retrieved on 2007-09-06.
  7. ^ Joo J, Ehrenpreis E, Gonzalez L, Kaye M, Breno S, Wexner S, Zaitman D, Secrest K (1998). "Alterations in colonic anatomy induced by chronic stimulant laxatives: the cathartic colon revisited.". J Clin Gastroenterol 26 (4): 283-6. PMID 9649012. 
  8. ^ Copeland P (1994). "Renal failure associated with laxative abuse". Psychother Psychosom 62 (3-4): 200-2. PMID 7531354. 
  9. ^ Wright L, DuVal J (1987). "Renal injury associated with laxative abuse". South Med J 80 (10): 1304-6. PMID 3660046. 

A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

A division of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System A Alimentary tract and metabolism // A06A Laxatives A06AA Softeners, emollients A06AA01 Liquid paraffin A06AA02 Docusate sodium A06AA51 Liquid paraffin, combinations A06AB Contact laxatives A06AB01 Oxyphenisatine A06AB02 Bisacodyl A06AB03 Dantron A06AB04 Phenolphthalein A06AB05 Castor oil A06AB06 Senna glycosides A06AB07 Cascara A06AB08 Sodium...

External links

MedlinePlus (medlineplus. ... MedlinePlus (medlineplus. ... The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System is used for the classification of drugs. ... Gut redirects here. ... A section of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. ... A bottle of antacid tablets An antacid is any substance, generally a base, which counteracts stomach acidity. ... An antiemetic is a drug that is effective against vomiting and nausea. ... An H2-receptor antagonist, often shortened to H2-antagonist, is a drug used to block the action of histamine on parietal cells in the stomach, decreasing acid production by these cells. ... Proton pump inhibitors (or PPIs) are a group of drugs whose main action is pronounced and long-lasting reduction of gastric acid production. ... An antidiarrhoeal drug is any medication which provides symptomatic relief for diarrhoea. ... For other uses, see Blood (disambiguation). ... 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Docusate (DAH cue sate) is the generic name of a surfactant used as a laxative and stool softener, which is sold in the U.S. under the brand names: Aqualax, Calube, Colace, Colace Micro-Enema, Correctol Softgel Extra Gentle, DC-240, Dialose, Diocto, Dioctocal, Dioctosoftez, Dioctyn, Dionex, Doc-Q-Lace... Oxyphenisatine (or oxyphenisatin acetate) is a laxative. ... Bisacodyl is the International Nonproprietary Name of a compound that functions as a stimulant laxative. ... Danthron is an anthroquinone derivative, 1,8-dihydroxyanthroquinone, used in some countries as a stimulant laxative. ... Phenolphthalein is a sensitive chemical with the formula C20H14O4 (often written as HIn in shorthand notation). ... Castor oil is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor bean (technically castor seed as the castor plant, Ricinus communis, is not a member of the bean family). ... Senna glycosides are a laxative. ... Binomial name Rhamnus purshiana DC. Rhamnus purshiana (Cascara Buckthorn, Cascara, Bearberry, and in the Chinook Jargon, Chittam or Chitticum; syn. ... Sodium picosulfate (INN, also known as sodium picosulphate) is a contact laxative used as a treatment for constipation or to prepare the large bowel before colonoscopy or surgery. ... Bisoxatin is a laxative. ... Psyllium or Ispaghula is the common name used for several members of the plant genus Plantago whose seeds are used commercially for the production of mucilage. ... Ethulose is a laxative. ... Sterculia (tropical chestnuts) Sterculia africana mopopaja tree Sterculia alata buddha coconut Sterculia alexandrii cape sterculia Sterculia apetala panama tree Sterculia balanghas Sterculia carthaginensis Sterculia chicha maranhao nut Sterculia diversifolia bottle tree Sterculia foetida sterculia nut, java olive Sterculia guerichii Sterculia guttata Sterculia ipomoeifolia Sterculia monosperma china chestnut, (pheng phok) Sterculia... For other uses, see Flax (disambiguation). ... Methylcellulose (or methyl cellulose) is a chemical compound derived from cellulose. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... Polycarbophil, also Calcium Polycarbophil is the International Nonproprietary Name of a synthetic polymer the calcium salt of polyacrylic acid cross-linked with divynyl glycol. ... Magnesium carbonate, MgCO3, is a white solid that occurs in nature as a mineral. ... Magnesium oxide, or magnesia, is a white solid mineral that occurs naturally as periclase and is a source of magnesium. ... R-phrases S-phrases , Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Magnesium peroxide is a fine powder peroxide with a white to white-off color. ... Magnesium sulfate (or sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium and sulfate, with the formula MgSO4. ... Lactulose is a synthetic sugar used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy, a complication of liver disease. ... Lactitol is a sugar alcohol used as a replacement sweetener for low calorie foods with approximately 40% of the sweetness of sugar. ... Sodium sulfate is an important compound of sodium. ... PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate, also known as pentrite, or rarely and primarily in German as nitropenta) is one of the most powerful high explosives known, with a relative effectiveness factor (R.E. factor) of 1. ... Macrogol is a laxative. ... Mannitol or hexan-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexol (C6H8(OH)6) is an osmotic diuretic agent and a weak renal vasodilator. ... Trisodium phosphate (TSP), available at most hardware stores in white powder form, is a cleaning agent and degreaser, commonly used to prepare household surfaces for painting. ... Sorbitol, also known as glucitol, is a sugar alcohol the body metabolises slowly. ... Magnesium citrate is a chemical agent used medicinally as a laxative and to empty the bowel prior to a surgery or colonoscopy. ... Sodium tartrate (Na4C4H4O6) is used as an emulsifier and a binding agent in food products such as jellies, margarine, and sausage casings. ... This 2qt (about 1. ... Trisodium phosphate (TSP), available at most hardware stores in white powder form, is a cleaning agent and degreaser, commonly used to prepare household surfaces for painting. ... Bisacodyl is the International Nonproprietary Name of a compound that functions as a stimulant laxative. ... Danthron is an anthroquinone derivative, 1,8-dihydroxyanthroquinone, used in some countries as a stimulant laxative. ... Glycerine, Glycerin redirects here. ... Synthetic motor oil For other uses, see Oil (disambiguation). ... Sorbitol, also known as glucitol, is a sugar alcohol the body metabolises slowly. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Laxative definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms easily defined on MedTerms (182 words)
Used to combat constipation (and sometimes overused, producing diarrhea).
Melanosis Coli - Melanosis coli, a condition that can be caused from chronic laxative abuse has no symptoms.
Read details about the different treatments available for constipation including laxatives, dietary fiber, enemas, suppositories, drugs, and surgery.
Dr. Koop - Laxative Poisoning- Health Encyclopedia and Reference (671 words)
Laxative Poisoning occurs from side effects and complications of consuming laxative medications in excessive amounts.
Moreover, the use of a laxative at the onset of constipation could delay treatment for serious underlying problems that are causing the irregularity.
Laxatives, in speeding the feces through the intestines, seem to alter the gastrointestinal tract in a way that may prolong the survival of offending organisms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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