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Encyclopedia > Lawrenceville School
The Lawrenceville School
Image:Lawrenceville_Seal.jpg
Virtus Semper Viridis
"Virtue Always Green"
Location
Lawrenceville, NJ, U.S.
Information
Religion None
Headmaster Elizabeth A. Duffy
Faculty 142
Average class size 12
Student:teacher ratio 6:1
Average SAT scores (2006) 650 verbal
680 math 670 writing
Type Private, Boarding
Campus 700 acres
Athletics 21 Interscholastic Sports
Athletics conference Mid Atlantic Prep League
Mascot Big Red
Color(s) Red/Black
Established 1810
Enrollment 804 total
549 boarding
255 day
Homepage

The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. Today, the School enrolls 800 boarding and day students, who come from 34 states and 29 countries. As of June 30, 2006, its endowment was roughly $229 million, or nearly $290,000 per student.[1] As of 2007, its endowment was tied for tenth in a ranking of 222 boarding schools.[2] Lawrenceville received 1,643 formal applications for entrance in fall 2006, of which only 348 — or 21% — were accepted. Image File history File links Lawrenceville_Seal. ... Map of Lawrenceville CDP in Mercer County Lawrenceville is a census-designated place and unincorporated area located within Lawrence Township in Mercer County, New Jersey. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Map of Lawrenceville CDP in Mercer County Lawrenceville is a census-designated place and unincorporated area located within Lawrence Township in Mercer County, New Jersey. ... Lawrence Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

One of the oldest prep schools in the U.S., Lawrenceville was founded in 1810 as the Maidenhead Academy. As early as 1828, the school attracted students from Cuba and England, as well as from the Choctaw Nations. It went by several subsequent names, including the Lawrenceville Classical and Commercial High School, the Lawrenceville Academy, and the Lawrenceville Classical Academy, before the school's current name, "The Lawrenceville School," was set during its refounding in 1883. A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ...


In 1951, a group of educators from three of America's elite prep schools (Lawrenceville, Phillips Academy, and Phillips Exeter Academy) and three of the country's most prestigious colleges (Harvard University, Princeton University, and Yale University) convened to examine the best use of the final two years of high school and the first two years of college. This committee published a final report, General Education in School and College, through Harvard University Press in 1952, which subsequently led to the establishment of the Advanced Placement Program (the AP Exams). Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Yale redirects here. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Advanced Placement Program is a program that offers college level courses at high schools across the United States and Canada. ...


Lawrenceville was featured in a number of novels by Owen Johnson, class of 1895, notably The Prodigious Hickey, The Tennessee Shad, and The Varmint (1910). The Varmint, which recounts the school years of the fictional character Dink Stover, was made into the 1950 motion picture The Happy Years which starred Leo G. Carroll and Dean Stockwell and was filmed on the Lawrenceville campus. A 1992 PBS miniseries was based on his Lawrenceville tales. Owen McMahon Johnson (August 27, 1878- January 27, 1952) was an American writer best remembered for his stories and novels cataloguing the educational and personal growth of the fictional character Dink Stover. ... See also: 1949 in film 1950 1951 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events February 15 - Walt Disney Studios animated film Cinderella debuts. ... Leo G. Carroll (October 25, 1892–October 16, 1972) was an British character actor, best known for his roles in several Hitchcock films and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. He was born in Weedon, Buckinghamshire to a wealthy Catholic family, who named him after the reigning pope... Dean Stockwell (born March 5, 1936 in North Hollywood, California) is an Oscar-nominated American film and television actor. ... Note: Public Broadcasting Services is a broadcaster in Malta. ...


In 1959, Fidel Castro spoke at the School in the Edith Memorial Chapel. Recent speakers have included boxer Muhammad Ali, former president of Honduras and alumnus Ricardo Maduro, first female President of Ireland Mary Robinson, playwright Edward Albee, legal scholar Derrick Bell, poet Billy Collins, playwright Christopher Durang, historians Niall Ferguson and David Hackett Fischer, the Rev. Peter J. Gomes, poet Seamus Heaney, political analyst Ariana Huffington, novelist Chang-rae Lee, photographer Andres Serrano, poet Mark Strand, writer Andrew Sullivan, politician Lowell Weicker, ambassador Pierre-Richard Prosper, and philosopher Cornel West. Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Ricardo Maduro Ricardo Rodolfo Maduro Joest (born April 20, 1946 in Panama) is a former President of Honduras and Bank of Honduras chairman. ... For the poet, see Mary Robinson (poet). ... Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, The Sandbox and The American Dream. ... Derrick Bell (born November 6, 1930) is a visiting professor of Constitutional Law at New York University School of Law for the past 15 years and a major figure within the legal studies discipline of Critical Race Theory. ... William J. (Billy) Collins (born March 22, 1941) is a poet who served two terms as the 11th Poet Laureate of the United States, from 2001 to 2003. ... Christopher Ferdinand Durang (born January 2, 1949) is an American playwright known for works of outrageous and often absurd comedy. ... Niall Ferguson Niall Ferguson (b. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Peter John Gomes is a prominent African American preacher and theologian at Harvard Universitys Divinity School. ... Seamus Justin Heaney (IPA: ) (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. ... Arianna Huffington talks to the media while campaigning for governor of California at UC Berkeley on September 11, 2003. ... Chang-Rae Lee (born July 29, 1965) is a first-generation Korean American novelist. ... Andres Serrano Andres Serrano (born August 15, 1950) is an American photographer who has become most notorious for his controversial piece Piss Christ, a red-tinged photograph of a crucifix submerged in the artists own urine. ... Mark Strand (born April 11, 1934) is an American poet, born in Canada. ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a libertarian conservative author and political commentator, distinguished by his often personal style of political analysis, and last, and often contended, in technology terms, yet to be determined, the number one solo pioneer in the field of pseudo-conversational political blog journalism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pierre-Richard Prosper was nominated by President George W. Bush on May 16, 2001 to become the second United States Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues. ... Cornell West redirects here. ...


Among Lawrenceville's prominent teachers over the years have been Thornton Wilder, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winning author, who taught French at the School in the 1920s; R. Inslee Clark, Jr., who revolutionized Ivy League admissions at Yale in the 1960s; and Thomas H. Johnson, a widely-published authority on Emily Dickinson. Faculty members have gone on to head institutions such as the Horace Mann School, Phillips Exeter Academy, the Groton School, Milton Academy, Westminster School, the Peddie School, and Governor Dummer Academy. Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... As Director of Admissions, Yale University, oversaw the schools transition to a coeducational admission policy. ... Emily Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. ... The Horace Mann School is an independent college preparatory school in New York City. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Groton School is a private, Episcopal, college preparatory boarding school located in Groton, Massachusetts, U.S. It enrolls approximately 350 boys and girls, from the eighth (Second Form) through twelfth grades (Sixth Form). ... Milton Academy is a private, preparatory, coeducational boarding and day school in Milton, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Westminster School (disambiguation). ... Peddie School is an American private coeducational high school located on a 280‑acre (1. ... Governor Dummer Academy was established in 1763, and is located on 450 acres in Byfield, Massachusetts, 25 miles north of Boston. ...


Lawrenceville was all-male for much of its nearly 200-year history, until the board of trustees voted to make the School coeducational in 1985. The first girls were admitted in 1987. In 1999, the student body elected a female president, Alexandra Petrone; in 2003, Elizabeth Duffy was appointed the School's first female head master; and in 2005, Sasha-Mae Eccleston, class of 2002, became Lawrenceville's first alumna to win a Rhodes Scholarship. Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...


The School's weekly newspaper, The Lawrence, has been in publication for 127 years. It has won numerous awards for journalistic excellence.[citation needed]


The Lit is the school's student run literary magazine first published in 1895 by Owen Johnson.


Lawrenceville will celebrate its bicentennial in 2010.


Geography and setting

Lawrenceville School sits across U.S. Route 206 or Main Street, from the center of Lawrenceville. The village has historically been active as a commercial center for students. The Jigger Shop was for years the most popular student hang out, with a soda fountain and the school bookstore. The store closed in the early 1980s. The village's pizza parlor remains a popular off-campus spot for students. U.S. Route 206 is a north-south United States highway in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, United States. ... Map of Lawrenceville CDP in Mercer County Lawrenceville is a census-designated place and unincorporated area located within Lawrence Township in Mercer County, New Jersey. ...


Along Lewisville Road at the back entrance of the school is the site of Lewisville, a small, largely African American community, many of whose residents historically worked as staff at the school.[citation needed] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The school includes a golf course, and owns much of the land to its east, which is covenanted as Green Space under New Jersey state law.


Lawrenceville sits midway between Trenton and Princeton, and has a strong historical connection to Princeton University Nickname: Location of Trenton inside of Mercer County Coordinates: , Country State County Mercer Incorporated November 13, 1792 Government  - Mayor Douglas H. Palmer Area  - City  8. ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


Educational program

Among Lawrenceville's most distinctive features is its house system common to British boarding schools. Students reside in three distinct groups of houses (or dorms), where they live with faculty members in a family-like setting: the Lower School, the Circle and Crescent Houses, and the Upper School. Freshmen, or 9th grade IInd formers (the school stopped accepting 8th grade Ist formers in 1997), stay in two dorms, one for boys (Raymond) and one for girls (Dawes). For their sophomore IIIrd and IVth form year, students are placed either into the Circle (for boys) or the Crescent (for girls) Houses. The "Circle Houses" are named for their location on a landscaped circle designed by the 19th-century landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who is most famous for designing New York City's Central Park. The Circle is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The "Crescent Houses" are similarly named after the layout of the buildings. Circle/Crescent houses, which field intramural sports teams, have their own traditions, and participate in friendly, though intense, competition. Circle houses are Kennedy, Hamill, Dickinson, Woodhull, Griswold and Cleve. Crescent houses are McClellan, Stanley, Stephens, and Kirby. Plans to build a new Crescent house, to be called Carter, are underway. Seniors (the Vth Form) live in separate dormitories off the Circle and Crescent. Some seniors live as prefects with underclassmen. The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...


Like the House system, the Harkness table is a hallmark of the School. In the Harkness method, teachers and students engage in Socratic, give-and-take discussions around large, wooden oval tables, which take the place of individual desks. The Harkness table refers to a style of teaching wherein students sit at a large, circular table with their teachers, in use at many American boarding schools and colleges. ... Socratic Method (or Method of Elenchus or Socratic Debate) is a dialectic method of inquiry, largely applied to the examination of key moral concepts and first described by Plato in the Socratic Dialogues. ...


Additionally the school prides itself for its use of consultations. Every whole day of school students have a period within the day, 30 minutes long, to go to their teachers classroom and ask them for personalized help. This is with the exception of Tuesday where the 'Consulation' period is used by the All-School Meeting.


Athletics

House Football: Griswold vs. Woodhull

Lawrenceville's arch-rival in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League is The Hill School of Pottstown, Pennsylvania. On the first or second weekend of November during "Hill Weekend," the two schools celebrate the nation's third oldest high school football rivalry and fifth oldest school rivalry in the nation, dating back to 1887.[3] Also famous, is the annual golf competition for the Crooked Stick, similar in format to the Ryder Cup. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Mid-Atlantic Prep League is a sports league with participating institutions from prep schools in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area. ... This article is about the boarding school in Pennsylvania. ... Pottstown is a borough in Montgomery County, 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Philadelphia, on the Schuylkill River. ... This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ...


Lawrenceville competes with other schools in baseball, basketball, crew, cross-country, fencing, field hockey, football, golf, hockey, indoor and outdoor track, lacrosse, soccer, softball, squash, swimming, tennis, volleyball, water polo, and wrestling. In addition, the School offers a variety of intramural sports, including Ultimate (sport) for the girls' Crescent Houses and 8-man tackle football for boys' Circle Houses. Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ...


Lawrenceville's House Football League is the oldest active football league in America. Teams compete against each other to battle for the pride of their house. Traditions abound, including the yearly rivalry game between the Hamill and Kennedy houses referred to as "The Crutch Game," first played in 1947. The game is fought for the possession of a historical crutch made of wood. The crutch is currently in the possession of the Hamill House, having won the most recent crutch game.


A bit of Lawrenceville football lore is recounted in the book Football Days, Memories of the Game and of the Men Behind the Ball by William H. Edwards, a graduate of Lawrenceville. The book describes the author's time as a member of the Lawrenceville football team, and paints a vivid picture of "the vital power of the collegial spirit."


Notable Recent Interscholastic Achievements:


On November 6, 2005, the Lawrenceville Varsity Field Hockey team defeated Stuart Country Day School 2-1 to capture their third straight Prep A State Championship. On November 5, 2006, the Field Hockey team defeated Stuart Country Day School 1-0 to capture their fourth straight Prep A State Championship. is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... Stuart Country Day School is an independent all-girls Catholic school located in Princeton Township, New Jersey. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stuart Country Day School is an independent all-girls Catholic school located in Princeton Township, New Jersey. ...


On February 12, 2006, the Lawrenceville Varsity Boys' Squash team won the National Championship for the third year in a row. is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball...


On May 18, 2006, the Lawrenceville Varsity Baseball Team won the New Jersey State Prep A Championship over Peddie School in a double header (14-0 and 6-1), marking their second state championship in three years. is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peddie School is an American private coeducational high school located on a 280‑acre (1. ...


In 2006, Lawrenceville graduate Joakim Noah competed as a member of the University of Florida Gators' back-to-back NCAA-championship winning basketball team in 2006 and 2007. Noah was voted the most outstanding player of the Final Four in 2006. Joakim Noah (pronunciation: JO-a-kim;[3] born February 25, 1985 in New York, New York) is a basketball player for the Chicago Bulls. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...


In 2006, the Dickinson House won the Foresman Trophy, annually awarded to the most athletically outstanding boys' circle house.


In Spring of 2007, the Woodhull House claimed the Foresman Trophy. Despite having 5 less people than other circle houses (though numbers have no effect on the outcome as the scoring is the average points per man, not cumulative total), Woodhull's balance between the interscholastic and intramural sports led them to victory. The Kirby House, for the second year in a row, claimed the Dresdner Cup.


Facilities

Memorial Hall, the center for English studies on the campus of The Lawrenceville School
Memorial Hall, the center for English studies on the campus of The Lawrenceville School
Edith Memorial Chapel
Edith Memorial Chapel

On Lawrenceville's 700-acre campus are thirty-four major buildings, including the Bunn Library (with space for 100,000 volumes). Peabody and Stearns designed the original campus of the school, which included Memorial Hall, a gymnasium, the headmaster’s house and five cottage-style residences, and provided future plans for the chapel.[4] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Peabody and Stearns was a premier architectural firm in the eastern United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ...


Opened in 1996, the Bunn Library offers more than 50,000 books, computer research facilities, an electronic classroom, study areas and an archives. Other campus highlights include a 56,000-square-foot science building (opened in spring 1998), a visual arts center (opened in fall 1998), a history center (reopened in fall 1999), and a music center (opened in fall 2000).


In the main arena of the Edward J. Lavino Field House are a permanent banked 200-meter track and three tennis/basketball/volleyball courts. Two additional hardwood basketball courts, a six-lane swimming pool, an indoor ice-hockey rink, a wrestling room, two fitness centers with a full-time strength and conditioning coaches, and a training-wellness facility are housed in the wings of the building as well as a new squash court facility, hosting ten new internationally zoned courts, which opened in 2003.


Lawrenceville has eighteen athletics fields, a nine-hole golf course, twelve outdoor tennis courts, a ¼-mile all-weather track, a boathouse, and a ropes and mountaineering course. During the summer, Lawrenceville is a popular site for sports-specific camps for youths, as well as several academic programs for students and teachers.


Affiliations

As discussed above, Lawrenceville athletics compete in the Mid-Atlantic Prep League. The Mid-Atlantic Prep League is a sports league with participating institutions from prep schools in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area. ...


Lawrenceville is part of an organization known as The Ten Schools Admissions Organization. This organization was founded more than forty years ago on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. Member schools include Lawrenceville, Choate Rosemary Hall, Deerfield Academy, The Hill School, The Taft School, The Hotchkiss School, St. Paul's School, Loomis Chaffee, Phillips Exeter Academy, and Phillips Academy Andover. The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the boarding school in Pennsylvania. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut, USA. The School was founded by Horace Dutton Taft in 1890. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... St. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in historic Windsor, Connecticut, U.S. It has a total enrollment of 720, 400 boarding and 320 day students, and 150 faculty members. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...


Lawrenceville is affiliated with The Island School - Cape Eleuthera, The Bahamas The Island School is located on Cape Eleuthera, on the island of Eleuthera in the Bahamas. ...


Notable Lawrentians

The following are some notable alumni of the Lawrenceville School.[5]

George Arthur Akerlof (born June 17, 1940) is an American economist and Koshland Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Dewey Follett Bartlett (March 28, 1919–March 1, 1979), a U.S. politician, He served as the second Republican Governor of Oklahoma from 1967 to 1971, following his predecessor, Henry Bellmon. ... Prince Turki bin Faisal al Saud (born February 15, 1945) is the former Saudi Head of Intelligence, Saudi Ambassador to the United Kingdom, Ireland and as of July 2005, the Saudi ambassador to the United States. ... Garth Ancier (born September 3, 1957 in New Jersey) is an American television executive. ... David Baird, Jr. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Dierks Bentley (born November 20, 1975 in Phoenix, Arizona) is a country music singer-songwriter. ... George Houston Brown (February 12, 1810 in Lawrenceville, New Jersey – August 1, 1865 in Somerville, New Jersey) was an American Whig Party politician, who represented New Jerseys 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1851 to 1853. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Frederick Buechner as photographed in 1950 by Carl Van Vechten Frederick Buechner (born July 11, 1926) is a Presbyterian minister and an American author. ... Fox Butterfield (born 1939 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania[1]) is an American journalist who spent much of his 30-year career[2] reporting for The New York Times. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Jay Carney is Washington Bureau Chief for Time Magazine. ... Richard Dean (born Richard Cowen in Bethesda, Maryland — died December 27, 2006 at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York) was an athlete, model and photographer. ... “CFL” redirects here. ... Michael Dammann Eisner (born March 7, 1942) was CEO of The Walt Disney Company from September 22, 1984 to September 30, 2005. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Disney redirects here. ... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Maurice Ferre (born June 23, 1935 in Ponce, Puerto Rico) is the first Puerto Rican to be elected Mayor of a major U.S. city. ... Major Sir Hamish Stewart Forbes, 7th Baronet, MBE, MC KStJ (15 February 1916 - 3 September 2007) was a British Army officer who served in the Welsh Guards in the Second World War, spending over 5 years in German custody as a prisoner of war. ... For the brush-footed butterfly species, see Euthalia nais. ... MBE can stand for: Member of the Order of the British Empire Mail Boxes Etc. ... The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... 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John Gutfreund is the former CEO of Salomon Brothers Inc, an investment bank that gained notoriety in the 1980s. ... This article deals with Salomon Brothers. ... Randolph Apperson Hearst (December 2, 1915 - December 18, 2000) was the last surviving son of William Randolph Hearst. ... The Hearst Corporation is a large privately-held media conglomerate based in New York City. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... Armond G. Hill (born on March 31, 1953 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American basketball coach and former pro basketball player. ... Owen McMahon Johnson (August 27, 1878- January 27, 1952) was an American writer best remembered for his stories and novels cataloguing the educational and personal growth of the fictional character Dink Stover. ... The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is a nonprofit corporation founded in 1937 by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist Hilla Rebay. ... Aldo Leopold (January 11, 1887 - April 21, 1948) was a United States ecologist, forester, and environmentalist. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Huey Lewis (born Hugh Anthony Cregg, III on July 5, 1950) is an American musician and occasional actor. ... Ricardo Maduro Ricardo Rodolfo Maduro Joest (born April 20, 1946 in Panama) is a former President of Honduras and Bank of Honduras chairman. ... Reginald Marsh (14 March 1898 - 3 July 1954) was an American painter most notable for his detailed depictions of life in New York City in the 1920s. ... Time magazine, May 25, 1970 Gynecologist William Howell Masters (December 27, 1915 – February 16, 2001) and psychologist Virginia Eshelman Johnson (born February 11, 1925) pioneered research into human sexual behavior during the 1950s and 1960s. ... poet James Merrill, age 30, in a 1957 publicity photograph for The Seraglio James Ingram Merrill (March 3, 1926 - February 6, 1995) was a Pulitzer Prize winning American writer, increasingly regarded as one of the most important 20th century poets in the English language. ... Clement Woodnutt Miller (October 28, 1916 - October 7, 1962) was a U.S. Representative from California, nephew of Thomas W. Miller. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Music was first awarded in 1943. ... Joakim Noah (pronunciation: JO-a-kim;[3] born February 25, 1985 in New York, New York) is a basketball player for the Chicago Bulls. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Chicago Bulls are a professional basketball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... First Lieutenant Jarvis Jennes Offutt (October 26, 1894 – August 13, 1918) was an aviator from Omaha, Nebraska who died in World War I. Offutt Air Force Base is named in his honor. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Offutt Air Force Base (Offutt AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force and a census-designated place (CDP) in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. ... Rodman McCamley Price (March 5, 1816 – June 7, 1894) was Governor of New Jersey from 1854 to 1857. ... New Jerseys Fifth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Scott Garrett. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This is a list of governors of New Jersey. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the Washington, DC meteorologist, see Bob Ryan (meteorologist). ... Hugh L. Scott (1853-1934) was Chief of Staff of the United States Army from 1914 to 1917, including the first few months of American involvement in World War I. Categories: Military biographical stubs | U.S. Army generals ... Brandon Tartikoff (January 13, 1949 — August 27, 1997) was a popular NBC executive who was credited with turning around NBCs low prime time reputation with such hit series as Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, ALF, Family Ties, The Cosby Show, Cheers, Miami Vice, The Golden Girls, Knight Rider... This article is about the television network. ... Taki Theodoracopulos (born August 11, 1937), better known as Taki, is a Greek born conservative journalist and writer, living in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Mobil gas station in the Loisaida section of the East Village of New York City Mobil was a major American oil company which merged with Exxon in 1999 to form ExxonMobil. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... James Harvie Wilkinson III (born in New York, New York, September 29, 1944) is a federal judge serving on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Wellington Yang (Chinese traditional: 楊呈偉, Pinyin: Yang Chengwei) is a Taiwanese American actor, playwright, and singer. ...

References

  1. ^ [1], Trustees of The Lawrenceville School, IRS Filing 990, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2006. Page 37.
  2. ^ Largest Endowments, Boarding School Review. Accessed September 20, 2007. This ranking listed the endowment at $200 million.
  3. ^ Ross, Rosemarie. "Hill ends season with key victory", Mercury (Pennsylvania), November 13, 2005. Accessed October 31, 2007. "In the game that annually means the most to them, it was near total Blues dominance as visiting Hill routed arch rival Lawrenceville, 41-18, Saturday to take home the silver trophy bowl for the second straight year. This was their 103rd showdown in a rivalry that started in 1887."
  4. ^ http://www.peabodyandstearns.com/schools1.html
  5. ^ http://www2.lawrenceville.org/alumni/association/recognition.asp accessed 5 December 2006
  6. ^ George Akerlof: Nobel Prize Autobiography, accessed April 2, 2007. "The Princeton Country Day School ended at grade nine. At that point most of my classmates dispersed among different New England prep schools. Both for financial reasons and also because they preferred that I stay at home, my family sent me down the road to the Lawrenceville School."
  7. ^ Slaymaker, S.R. II. Five Miles Away: The Story of The Lawrenceville School. Lawrenceville, NJ: 1985.
  8. ^ David Baird, Jr., Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 26, 2007.
  9. ^ Dierks Bentley ’93 Wins CMA Horizon Award, Lawrenceville School, November 16, 2005. Accessed September 30, 2007.
  10. ^ George Houston Brown, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 1, 2007.
  11. ^ a b Gussow, Mel. "James Merrill Is Dead at 68; Elegant Poet of Love and Loss", The New York Times, February 7, 1995. Accessed October 31, 2007. "He went to Lawrenceville School, where one of his close friends and classmates was the novelist Frederick Buechner."
  12. ^ "Major Sir Hamish Forbes, Bt: Champion of Highland and Gaelic culture who as a wartime PoW had been decorated for his numerous escape attempts", The Times, September 20, 2007. Accessed October 24, 2007. "Hamish Stewart Forbes was educated at Eton, at Lawrenceville in the United States and the School of Oriental and African Studies in London."
  13. ^ James, George. "Malcolm Forbes, Publisher, Dies at 70", The New York Times, February 26, 1990. Accessed October 24, 2007. "Young Forbes attended the Lawrenceville School and Princeton University, where he majored in politics and economics."
  14. ^ "Court Voice Of Reaganism Charles Fried", The New York Times October 24, 1985. p. 9
  15. ^ Huey Lewis profile, Back to the Future, accessed December 26, 2006.
  16. ^ Clement Woodnutt Miller, United States Congress. Accessed June 2, 2007.
  17. ^ Rodman McCamley Price, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 24, 2007.

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The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

  • Lawrenceville School website
  • Boarding School Review
  • Lawrenceville School Music program
  • Lawrenceville School Theatre and Dance programs
  • National Center for Education Statistics data for the Lawrenceville School

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ten Schools Admission Organization (1022 words)
Founded more than 45 years ago on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions, the Ten Schools Admission Organization is a group of distinguished college preparatory institutions that cooperate in their outreach to prospective students and their families.
Among the strengths that the member schools share are high academic standards, rich institutional histories, and a commitment to educating the whole person.
Lawrenceville offers its students an education that not only prepares them for college but also teaches them to be active, thoughtful members of society.
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