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Encyclopedia > Lawrence Booth
Lawrence Booth
Archbishop of York
Enthroned {{{began}}}
Ended May 19, 1480
Predecessor George Neville
Successor Thomas Rotherham
Consecration translated October 8, 1476
Died May 19, 1480
Buried Southwell Minster
Christianity Portal

Lawrence Booth (c. 1420 – 1480) was Bishop of Durham and then Archbishop of York. is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... George Neville (c. ... Dr Thomas Rotherham (1423 - 1500) was an English cleric and minister. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 2 - Battle of Grandson. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... Southwell Minster Southwell Minster is a minster and cathedral, in the British town of Southwell in Nottinghamshire, six miles away from Newark. ... The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ...


Life

A scion of the ancient Cheshire family of Booth, His Grace started out studying both civil and canon law at Pembroke Hall in Cambridge, becoming a licentiate. He was appointed Master of his college in 1450, a post he held until his death, and later was appointed Chancellor of the University. During his residence at Cambridge, he started a movement for both an arts school and a school of civil law, where his first miracle is believed to have occurred. Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College(s) Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates ~420 Postgraduates ~240 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a...


Outside Cambridge, his career advanced quickly. In 1449 he was named a prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral and on November 2, 1456 he was named Dean of the Cathedral. He was also a prebendary at York and Lichfield. A prebendary is a post connected to a cathedral or collegiate church and is a type of canon. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ...


Booth's activity was not confined to the church, he was also active in the government. He became Chancellor to Queen Margaret and, around 1456, he became keeper of the Privy Seal,[1] and that same year on January 28 he was appointed one of the tutors and guardians of the Prince of Wales. He was Lord Privy Seal until 1460.[1] For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ... Denmark has had two Queens named Margaret Margaret I- in the early 15th century Margaret II- the present queen ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ...


On September 25, 1456 he was consecrated as Bishop of Durham.[2] This was both an important ecclesiastical appointment, and an equally important civil one, as the Bishop of Durham would exercise civil authority over a large area of northern England almost up to the reign of Queen Victoria. is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ...


Although a Lancastrian, after the fall of Henry VI Booth accommodated himself to the new realities. He submitted to Edward in April of 1461, and at the end of June beat back a raid led by the lords Ros, Dacre and Rougemont-Grey who brought Henry VI over the border to try and raise a rebellion in the north of England.[3] Edward named him his confessor.[4] Although he temporarily lost control of the Bishopric of Durham, he was restored to it in 1464, when he made submission to King Edward IV, and he was never imprisoned.[5] He took an active part in Edward's government thereafter and on July 27, 1473 was made Keeper of the Great Seal, which office he held until May of 1474.[6] In October of 1473 he led a delegation to Scotland to formally sign a marriage treaty between the newborn son (later James IV of Scotland) of James III and Edward's third daughter Cecily.[7] Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Thomas de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (September 9, 1427 - May 17, 1464) was a follower of the House of Lancaster during the Wars of the Roses. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Ottoman sultan Mehmed II defeats the White Sheep Turkmens lead by Uzun Hasan at Otlukbeli Axayacatl, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan invades the territory of neighboring Aztec city of Tlatelolco. ... The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain, was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England. ... James IV (March 17, 1473-September 9, 1513) was King of Scots from 1488 to his death. ... James III of Scotland (1451/ 1452 – June 11, 1488), son of James II and Mary of Gueldres, created Duke of Rothesay at birth, king of Scotland from 1460 to 1488. ... Cecily of York (March 20, 1469 - August 24, 1507) was the third daughter of Edward IV of England and his Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville. ...


In 1476 he was translated to the Archbishopric of York,[8] succeeding to the place his half brother had held until his death in 1464. He was the only bishop that Edward IV inherited that was ever promoted to a higher office.[9] He was archbishop until his own death on May 19, 1480,[8] when he was buried beside his brother in the collegiate church of Southwell, which both he and his brother had liberally endowed. is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 95
  2. ^ Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 242
  3. ^ Ross Edward IV p. 45-6
  4. ^ Seward The Wars of the Roses p. 85
  5. ^ Davies "The Church and the Wars of the Roses" in The Wars of the Roses p. 141
  6. ^ Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 87
  7. ^ Ross Edward IV p. 213
  8. ^ a b Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 282
  9. ^ Ross Edward IV p. 318

References

  • Davies, Richard G. "The Church and the Wars of the Roses" in The Wars of the Roses ed. by A. J. Pollard New York: St. Martin's Press 1995 ISBN 0-312-12697-2
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology, Third Edition, revised, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. 
  • Ross, Charles Edward IV Berkeley: University of California Press 1974 ISBN 0-520-02781-7
  • Seward, Desmond The Wars of the Roses: Through the Lives of Five Men and Women of the Fifteenth Century New York:Viking 1995 ISBN 0-670-84258-3
  • A. J. Pollard, ‘Booth , Laurence (c.1420–1480)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008
Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Lisieux
Lord Privy Seal
1456–1460
Succeeded by
Robert Stillington
Preceded by
Robert Stillington
Lord Chancellor
1473–1474
Succeeded by
John Alcock
Roman Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Robert Neville
Bishop of Durham
1456–1476
Succeeded by
William Dudley
Preceded by
George Neville
Archbishop of York
1476–1480
Succeeded by
Thomas Rotherham
Persondata
NAME Booth, Lawrence
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Booth, Laurence; Bothe, Lawrence; Bothe, Laurence
SHORT DESCRIPTION Lord Privy Seal; Lord Chancellor; Bishop of Durham; Archbishop of York
DATE OF BIRTH c. 1420
PLACE OF BIRTH
DATE OF DEATH May 19, 1480
PLACE OF DEATH
List of Bishops of Durham. ... The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Prince-Bishop was the title given bishops who held secular powers, beside their inherent clerical power. ... The Diocese of Durham is a Church of England diocese, based in Durham, and covering the historic County Durham (and therefore including the southern part of Tyne and Wear and the northern part of Cleveland). ... Aldhun of Durham (died 1018) was the last Bishop of Lindisfarne and the first Bishop of Durham. ... Eadmund of Durham was Bishop of Durham from 1021-1041. ... Eadred was Bishop of Durham from 1041-1042. ... Eathelric was Bishop of Durham from 1042-1056. ... Ethelwin was the last Anglo-Saxon bishop of Durham (1056-1071), the last who was not also a secular ruler, and the only English bishop at the time of the Norman Conquest who did not remain loyal to William the Conqueror. ... William Walcher (d. ... William of St Calais (Carilef) (d. ... Ranulf Flambard, or Squiffy (died September 5, 1128) was Bishop of Durham and an influential government minister of William Rufus. ... Geoffrey Rufus was the tenth Lord Chancellor and Lord Keeper of England, from 1123 to 1133. ... William of St. ... Hugh de Puiset (c. ... Philip of Poitou (d. ... Richard Marsh served as Lord Chancellor of England and Bishop of Durham. ... Richard Poore (d. ... Nicholas Farnham was Bishop of Durham from 1241-1249. ... Walter of Kirkham was Bishop of Durham in 1249. ... Robert Stitchill was Bishop of Durham from 1260-1274. ... Robert of Holy Island was Bishop of Durham from 1274-1283. ... Antony Bek (d. ... Richard Kellaw was Bishop of Durham from 1311-1316  This article about a Bishop or Prince-Bishop of Durham is a stub. ... Lewis de Beaumont was Bishop of Durham from 1318-1333. ... Richard Aungerville (or Aungervyle) (January 24, 1287 - April 14, 1345), commonly known as Richard de Bury, was an English writer and bishop, He was born near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, the son of Sir Richard Aungervyle, who was descended from one of William the Conquerors men. ... Thomas Hatfield was Bishop of Durham from 1345-1381. ... John Fordham was Bishop of Durham from 1382-1388. ... Walter Skirlaw was Bishop of Durham from 1388-1406. ... Cardinal Thomas Langley (b. ... Robert Neville (1408 - 1457) was a Bishop of Salisbury and an Bishop of Durham. ... Lawrence Booth (d. ... William Dudley was Bishop of Durham from 1476-1483. ... John Sherwood was Bishop of Durham from 1484-1494. ... Richard Fox (c. ... William Senhouse (died 1505), also called William Sever, was an English priest, successively Bishop of Carlisle, 1495–1502, and Bishop of Durham, 1502–1505. ... Bainbridge, Christopher (1464?–1514), archbishop of York and cardinal, Bambridge came from a family based in Westmorland - he was a maternal nephew of Thomas Langton, Bishop of Winchester, which may account for his charmed early life. ... Thomas Ruthall, (died February 4, 1523), was a Chancellor of the University of Cambridge and Bishop of Durham. ... Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, (c. ... Cuthbert Tunstall (or Tonstall) (1474 - November 18, 1559) was an English church leader, twice Bishop of Durham. ... James Pilkington (1520 - 1576), was the Bishop of Durham from 1561 until his death in 1576. ... Richard Barnes (1532–1587) was an Anglican priest who served as a bishop in the Church of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. He was educated at Brasenose College, Oxford, where he was elected a fellow in 1552, and received his MA in 1557 and his DD in... Matthew Hutton (1529 — 1606), archbishop of York, son of Matthew Hutton of Priest Hutton, in the parish of Warton, North Lancashire, was born in that parish in 1529. ... Tobias Matthew, or Tobie (1546 - March 29, 1628), archbishop of York, was the son of Sir John Matthew of Ross in Herefordshire, and of his wife Eleanor Crofton of Ludlow. ... William James was Bishop of Durham from 1606-1617. ... Richard Neile (1562-1640) was an English churchman, bishop of several English dioceses and Archbishop of York from 1631 until his death. ... George Montaigne was Archbishop of York from July to October 1628. ... John Howson was Bishop of Durham from 1628-1632  This article about a Bishop or Prince-Bishop of Durham is a stub. ... Thomas Morton (1564 - 1659), was an English churchman, bishop of several dioceses. ... John Cosin (November 30, 1594 - January 15, 1672) was an English churchman. ... Nathanial Crew, 3rd Baron Crew (January 31, 1633–1721) was Bishop of Oxford from 1671 to 1674, then Bishop of Durham from 1674 to 1721. ... The Right Reverend William Talbot (1658–October 10, 1730) was Bishop of Oxford from 1699 to 1715, Bishop of Salisbury from 1715 to 1722 and Bishop of Durham from 1722 to 1730. ... Edward Chandler was Bishop of Durham from 1730-1750. ... Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. ... Richard Trevor was Bishop of Durham from 1752-1771. ... John Egerton (30 November 1721–18 June 1787) was an Anglican bishop. ... Thomas Thurlow was Bishop of Durham from 1787-1781. ... Shute Barrington (1734—1826), youngest son of the John Shute Barrington, 1st Viscount Barrington, was educated at Eton College and Oxford, and after holding some minor dignities was made bishop of Llandaff in 1769. ... William Van Mildert (1765–1836) was the last Prince-Bishop of Durham (1826–1836), and one of the founders of the University of Durham. ... Edward Maltby was Bishop of Durham from 1836-1856. ... A photo of Charles Thomas Longley by Lewis Carroll Charles Thomas Longley (1794-1868) was an English churchman, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1862 until his death. ... Henry Montagu Villiers (January 1813 – 9 August 1861) was a British clergyman of the Church of England. ... Charles Baring was Bishop of Durham from 1861-1879. ... Joseph Barber Lightfoot (April 13, 1828–December 21, 1889) was an English theologian and Bishop of Durham. ... Brooke Foss Westcott (January 12, 1825 _ July 27, 1901) was an English churchman and theologian, Bishop of Durham from 1890 until his death. ... Handley Moule was Bishop of Durham from 1901-1920. ... Henson in 1932 Bishop of Durham from 1920 to 1939, Anglican preacher and controversialist, Herbert Hensley Henson was born in London in 1863 and died in Hintlesham, Suffolk, in 1947. ... Alwyn Williams was Bishop of Durham from 1939-1952. ... Arthur Michael Ramsey, Baron Ramsey of Canterbury PC (14 Nov 1904 – 23 April 1988) was the one hundredth Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Maurice Harland was Bishop of Durham from 1956-1966. ... Ian Ramsey was Bishop of Durham from 1966-1972. ... John Stapylton Habgood, Baron Habgood (born 1927), was Bishop of Durham between 1973 - 1983, and Archbishop of York between 1983 - 1995. ... David Edward Jenkins (born January 26, 1925) is best known as the Bishop of Durham, a post he held from 1984 until 1994. ... Michael Turnbull (b. ... Tom (N.T.) Wright, Bishop of Durham Tom (N.T.) Wright is the Bishop of Durham of the Anglican Church and a leading British New Testament scholar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lawrence Booth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (362 words)
Booth's activity was not confined to the church, he was also active in the government.
He became Chancellor to Queen Margaret and, around 1456, he became keeper of the Privy Seal, and that same year on January 28 he was appointed one of the tutors and guardians of the Prince of Wales.
This was both an important ecclesiastical appointment, and an equally important civil one, as the Bishop of Durham would exercise civil authority over a large area of northern England almost up to the reign of Queen Victoria.
Meet personal injury attorneys Lawrence Booth, Richard Koskoff, and Roger Booth (1187 words)
Lawrence R. Booth graduated first among day students from the University of Southern California in 1959, having served as Editor-in-Chief of the USC Law Review.
Lawrence Booth was the subject of a "Litigator Profile" in the Daily Journal (the leading legal newspaper in California).
Lawrence Booth, Richard Koskoff and Roger Booth have enjoyed so much success as personal injury attorneys in Los Angeles because of their extensive experience and skill, dedication to their clients and meticulous pursuit of the facts of each case they handle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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