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Encyclopedia > Latin music

Latin American music, or the music of Latin America, is sometimes called Latin music. It includes the music of many countries and comes in many varieties, from the down-home conjunto music of Northern Mexico to the sophisticated habanera of Cuba, from the symphonies of Heitor Villa-Lobos to the simple and moving Andean flute.


Music has played an important part in Latin America's turbulent recent history, for example the nueva cancion movement.


Although Spain isn't a part of Latin America, Spanish music and Latin American music strongly cross-fertilized each other, but Latin music also absorbed influences from English and American music, and particularly, African music.


For an analysis of Latin music by country see:


  Results from FactBites:
 
Latin music in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (586 words)
It was common in dance halls in the 30s and 40s for a Latin orchestra, such as that of Vincent Lopez, to alternate with a big band because dancers insisted on it.
Latin music was extremely popular with dancers, not only the samba, paso doble, rumba, and mambo, but even the conga.
While Latin music has been popular for many years, its current popularity in the mainstream may have come only after the untimely death of the popular Tex Mex singer Selena.
Latin American music - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1515 words)
Latin American music, sometimes simply called Latin music, includes the music of many countries and comes in many varieties, from the simple, rural conjunto music of northern Mexico to the sophisticated habanera of Cuba, from the symphonies of Heitor Villa-Lobos to the simple and moving Andean flute.
Salsa is an amalgamation of Latin musical styles, especially Cuban and Puerto Rican, created in the pan-Latin melting pot of New York City in the early 1970s.
Music from non-Latin parts of the Caribbean are also popular, especially Jamaican reggae and dub, and Trinidadian calypso music.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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