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Encyclopedia > Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem

The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is the title given to the Latin Rite Roman Catholic Archbishop of Jerusalem. The Archdiocese of Jerusalem has jurisdiction for all Latin Rite Catholics in Israel and Palestine. In addition, the Eastern Rite Melkite Greek Catholic Church and Maronite Catholic Church have established dioceses for their faithful in the territories. Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article (The Latin Rite), is a term by which documents of the Catholic Church designate the particular Church, distinct from the Eastern Rite Churches, that developed in western Europe and northern Africa, where Latin was the language of... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The term Patriarch of Jerusalem can refer to the holders of one of three offices: The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, who is one of the Roman Catholic patriarchs of the east The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, who is one of nine highest-ranking Eastern Orthodox bishops, called patriarchs The Armenian... Palestine (Hebrew: פלשתינה Palestina, Arabic: فلسطين FilastÄ«n or FalastÄ«n, see also Canaan, Land of Israel) is one of many historical names for the region between the Mediterranean Sea and the banks of the Jordan River, plus various adjoining lands to the east and south. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... The coat of arms of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church The Melkite Greek Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris particular Church in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church and the Pope of Rome. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ...


The Patriarchate of Jerusalem is currently the only Eastern patriarchal title to be assigned to a Latin Rite bishop. The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem does not head an sui iuris particular church but is rather a bishop whose see has as a permanent privilege the honorific title of patriarch, similarly to the Patriarchs of Venice, Lisbon, and the East Indies. Originally a patriarch was a man who exercised autocratic authority as a pater familias over an extended family. ... Jerusalem (31°46′N 35°14′E; Hebrew: (help· info) Yerushalayim; Arabic: (help· info) al-Quds), Greek Ιεροσόλυμα, is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 meter. ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions which developed in Greece, the Balkans, the rest of Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, and the Middle East over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Sui iuris is a Latin phrase that literally means “of one’s own right”. It is usually spelled sui juris in civil law, which uses the phrase to indicate legal competence, the capacity to manage one’s own affairs (Blacks Law Dictionary, Oxford English Dictionary). ... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ... Among the Patriarchates in the West, the Pope, as Bishop of Rome is the only truly independent Patriarch. ... The Patriarch of Lisbon is one of the few western Patriarchs in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Patriarch of the East Indies in the Catholic hierarchy is the title of the Archbishop of Goa and Damao in India; another title of his is that of the Primate of the East. ...

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Crusader patriarchate

In 1099 Jerusalem was recaptured from Islamic occupation by Crusaders, inaugurating the Kingdom of Jerusalem, which endured almost 200 years. A Latin hierarchy was established in the Kingdom under a Latin Patriarch. When the last vestiges of the Kingdom were conquered by the Mamelukes in 1291, the Latin hierarchy and it's laity was effectively genocided in the Levant. However, the Church continued to appoint titular Patriarchs of Jerusalem, who were based at the Basilica di San Lorenzo fuori le Mura in Rome after 1374. 1099 also refers to a United States tax form used for--among other things--independent contractors. ... Jerusalem (31°46′N 35°14′E; Hebrew: (help· info) Yerushalayim; Arabic: (help· info) al-Quds), Greek Ιεροσόλυμα, is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 meter. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for themselves. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... When first appointed auxiliary bishop of the Diocese of Honolulu in Hawaii, Joseph Anthony Ferrario became a titular bishop of the ancient Egyptian city of Cusae. ... The Basilica di San Lorenzo fuori le Mura is a shrine to the martyred Roman deacon, Saint Lawrence. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ...


During the existence of the Latin Kingdom, the Latin Patriarchate was divided into four archdioceses -their heads bearing the titles of Archbishop of Tyre, Archbishop of Caesarea, Archbishop of Nazareth, and Archbishop of Petra - and a number of suffragan dioceses. The Latin Patriarch controlled the Latin quarter of the city of Jerusalem (the Holy Sepulchre and the immediate surroundings), and had as his direct suffragans the bishops of Lydda-Ramla, Bethlehem, Hebron, and Gaza, and the abbots of the Temple, Mount Sion, and the Mount of Olives. The Archbishop of Tyre was one of the major suffragans of the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem during the Crusades and was established to serve the Catholic members of the diocese. ... The Archbishop of Caesarea was one of the major suffragans of the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem during the crusades. ... The Archbishop of Nazareth was one of the major suffragans of the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem during the crusades. ... This Archbishop of Petra served the diocese of Palaestrina III; the Oultrejordain area, and traditionally included St. ... Lod (Hebrew לוד; Arabic اللد al-Ludd, Greco-Latin Lydda) is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... Ramla (Hebrew רמלה Ramlāh; Arabic الرملة ar-Ramlah, colloquial Ramleh), is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... The Church of the Nativity, a Bethlehem Landmark Bethlehem (Arabic بيت لحم (help· info) house of meat; Standard Hebrew בית לחם house of bread, Bet léḥem / Bet láḥem; Tiberian Hebrew Bêṯ léḥem / Bêṯ lāḥem) (Greek: Βηθλεέμ) is a city in the West Bank under Palestinian Authority considered a central hub of... Hebron (Arabic (help· info) al-ḪalÄ«l; Hebrew (help· info), Standard Hebrew Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥeḇrôn: derived from the word friend) is a town in the Southern Judea region of the West Bank of around 130,000 Palestinians and 500 Israeli settlers. ... Image:Gazaseal. ... The Temple Mount (Hebrew: (without niqqud: הר הבית), Har haBáyit) or Noble Sanctuary (Arabic: الحرم الشريف, â–¶ (help· info)) is a hotly contested religious site in the Old City of Jerusalem. ... Mount Sion Primary School is a school on Barrack Street, Waterford City, Ireland, founded by Edmund Ignatius Rice in 1802. ... The Mount of Olives (also Mount Olivet, Hebrew: Har HaZeitim הר הזיתים, sometimes Jebel et-Tur, Mount of the Summit, or Jebel ez-Zeitun, Mount of Olives) is a mountain ridge to the east of Jerusalem. ...


Modern patriarchate

The title Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem was restored as a residential office in 1847 for Bishop Joseph Valerga. The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is now the diocesan bishop of Latin Catholics in the Holy Land, including Jordan and Cyprus. The current Patriarch is His Beatitide Michel Sabbah, the first Palestinian to hold the post. The residence of the Patriarch is in the Old City of Jerusalem, while the seminary, which is responsible for the liturgical education, was moved to Beit Jala, a town 10 km south of Jerusalem, in 1936. 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Michel Sabbah His Beatitude Michel Sabbah (born March 19, 1933 in Nazareth) is the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem and Archbishop of Jerusalem. ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students in religion, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such... Beit Jala (Arabic:, (help· info), Hebrew; Gilo, possibly from Aramaic grass carpet) is a small town in Palestine. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


List of Latin Patriarchs of Jerusalem

(Jerusalem lost in 1187; seat of the Patriarch moved to Acre) Arnulf Malecorne of Choques (or of Rohes) (died 1118) was a leader among the clergy during the First Crusade, and was Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem in 1099 and from 1112 to 1118. ... 1099 also refers to a United States tax form used for--among other things--independent contractors. ... Dagobert (also Daimbert), Archbishop of Pisa, was the first Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem after it was captured in the First Crusade. ... 1099 also refers to a United States tax form used for--among other things--independent contractors. ... Events Valencia is captured by the Almoravids. ... Events Valencia is captured by the Almoravids. ... Dagobert (also Daimbert), Archbishop of Pisa, was the first Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem after it was captured in the First Crusade. ... Events Valencia is captured by the Almoravids. ... Events William Warelwast becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events William Warelwast becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events The people of Laon, France, proclaim a commune and murder their bishop Salzwedel, Germany is founded The German state of Baden is founded Afonso I becomes Count of Portugal Otto of Ballenstedt is made Duke of Saxony by Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor Births Deaths October 5 - Sigebert of... Arnulf Malecorne of Choques (or of Rohes) (died 1118) was a leader among the clergy during the First Crusade, and was Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem in 1099 and from 1112 to 1118. ... Events The people of Laon, France, proclaim a commune and murder their bishop Salzwedel, Germany is founded The German state of Baden is founded Afonso I becomes Count of Portugal Otto of Ballenstedt is made Duke of Saxony by Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor Births Deaths October 5 - Sigebert of... Events Knights Templar founded Baldwin of Le Bourg succeeds his cousin Baldwin I as king of Jerusalem John II Comnenus succeeds Alexius I as Byzantine emperor Gelasius II succeeds Paschal II as pope Births November 28 - Manuel I Comnenus, Byzantine Emperor (died 1180) Andronicus I Comnenus, Byzantine Emperor (died 1185... Events February 2 - Callixtus II becomes Pope August 20 - Henry I of England routes Louis VI at the Battle of Bremule. ... Events Pope Honorius II recognizes and confirms the Order of the Knights Templar. ... Events Pope Honorius II recognizes and confirms the Order of the Knights Templar. ... Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... Events Pope Lucius II is succeeded by Pope Eugene III Nur ad-Din ascends to power in Syria Construction begins on Notre-Dame dChartres in Chartres, France Korean historian Kim Pusik compiled the historical text Samguk Sagi. ... Events Saint Bernard of Clairvaux preaches the Second Crusade at Vezelay, Burgundy First written mention of Bryansk. ... Events Births September 8 - King Richard I of England (died 1199) Leopold V of Austria (died 1194) Hojo Masako, wife of Minamoto no Yoritomo (died 1225) Deaths August 21 - King Alfonso VII of Castile (born 1105) Agnes of Babenberg, daughter of Leopold III of Austria Sweyn III of Denmark Yury... Events Births September 8 - King Richard I of England (died 1199) Leopold V of Austria (died 1194) Hojo Masako, wife of Minamoto no Yoritomo (died 1225) Deaths August 21 - King Alfonso VII of Castile (born 1105) Agnes of Babenberg, daughter of Leopold III of Austria Sweyn III of Denmark Yury... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... Heraclius of Caesarea (died 1191) was archbishop of Caesarea and Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... // Events May 12 - Richard I of England marries Berengaria of Navarre. ... // Events May 1 - Battle of Cresson - Saladin defeats the crusaders July 4 - Saladin defeats Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, at the Battle of Hattin. ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ...

(Acre lost in 1291; moved to Cyprus then Rome after 1374; only honorary patriarchs until 1847) Events November 20 - Palermo falls to Henry VI, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire December 25 - Henry VI is crowned king of Sicily. ... // Events August 1 - Arthur of Brittany captured in Mirebeau, north of Poitiers Beginning of the Fourth Crusade. ... // Events August 1 - Arthur of Brittany captured in Mirebeau, north of Poitiers Beginning of the Fourth Crusade. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Albert Avogadro (1149-September 14, 1214), was a canon lawyer who served as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem from 1204 until his death. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Events Simon Apulia becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Raoul of Merencourt (also called Ralph or Radulphus) was Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem from 1214-1225. ... Events Simon Apulia becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events Births Thomas Aquinas, Christian philosopher and theologian (d. ... Events Births Thomas Aquinas, Christian philosopher and theologian (d. ... Events In the Iberian peninsula, James I of Aragon captures the city of Valencia September 28 from the Moors; the Moors retreat to Granada. ... Jacques de Vitry (c. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. ... Events Königsberg was founded Births Emperor Albert I of Germany, in July Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1255 ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events The philosophical doctrine Averroism is banned from Paris by bishop Etienne Tempier Burmas Pagan empire begins to disintegrate after being defeated by Kublai Khan at Ngasaungsyan, near the Chinese border. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events February 22 - Nicholas IV becomes Pope. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ...

(unknown; the Franciscan Custos of the Holy Lands (The Grand Masters of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre) held the title in technicality from 1342 to 1830 under the Papal bull Gratiam agimus by Pope Clement VI (unless someone was specifically appointed in the honorary office). ) Antony Bek (d. ... Events March 25 - Robert the Bruce becomes King of Scotland June 19 - Forces of Earl of Pembroke defeat Bruces Scottish rebels at the Battle of Methven Philip IV of France exiles all the Jews from France and confiscates their property In London, a city ordinance degrees that heating with... Events Bolingbroke Castle passes to the House of Lancaster. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Events May 11 - In France, 64 members of the Knights Templar are burned at the stake for heresy Abulfeda becomes governor of Hama. ... The Knights and Ladies of the Holy Sepulchre walk in a procession at the First Annual Southeastern Eucharistic Congress in Charlotte, NC. The Catholic Order of the Holy Sepulchre (formally Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem) has a foundation myth that connects it with Godfrey of Bouillon or... Events May - Pope Clement VI elected John III Comnenus becomes emperor of Trebizond Louis becomes king of Sicily and duke of Athens Constantine IV becomes king of Armenia Patriarch of Antioch transferred to Damascus under Ignatius II Kitzbühel becomes part of Tyrol Louis I becomes king of Hungary Births... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Clement VI, né Pierre Roger (1291 – December 6, 1352), the fourth of the Avignon Popes, was elected in May 1342, and reigned until his death. ...

(Restoration of resident Latin patriarchs of Jerusalem with jurisdiction in 1847) Events May - Pope Clement VI elected John III Comnenus becomes emperor of Trebizond Louis becomes king of Sicily and duke of Athens Constantine IV becomes king of Armenia Patriarch of Antioch transferred to Damascus under Ignatius II Kitzbühel becomes part of Tyrol Louis I becomes king of Hungary Births... Events April 7 - Charles University is founded in Prague. ... Events Births March 13 - Louis of Valois, Duke of Orléans, son of king Charles V of France Princess Beatrice of Portugal, heiress to the throne during the 1383-1385 Crisis Deaths Categories: 1372 ... Events February 10 - John Beaufort becomes Earl of Somerset. ... Events The Lollards, a religious sect taught by John Wycliffe, were persecuted for their beliefs. ... Innocent IX, né Giovanni Antonio Facchinetti (July 22, 1519 – December 30, 1591), who was born to a modest working family in the mountainous comune of Cravegna, in the diocese of Novara, northern Italy, was a canon lawyer, diplomat, and chief administrator during the reign of Pope Gregory XIV. He succeeded... Events January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Events First performance of Racines tragedy, Phèdre Sarah Churchill marries John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough Battle of Cassel, Philippe I of Orléans defeats William of Orange Mary II of England marries William of Orange English Statute of frauds is passed into law Battle of Landskrona Elias... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... Vincent Louis Gotti (September 5, 1664 – September 18, 1742) was a Cardinal and theologian of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Events Astronomical aberration discovered by the astronomer James Bradley Swedish academy of sciences founded at Uppsala Births January 9 - Thomas Warton, English poet (d. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Pompeio or Pompeo Aldrovandi (September 23, 1668 - January 6, 1752) was a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This is a List of Latin Patriarchs of Alexandria established in 1215 during the pontificate of Pope Innocent III. This titular office was abolished in 1964. ...

(Latin patriarchate hierarchy re-established in 1889) 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1970 (MCMLXX in Roman) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1970 (MCMLXX in Roman) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michel Sabbah His Beatitude Michel Sabbah (born March 19, 1933 in Nazareth) is the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem and Archbishop of Jerusalem. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

See Patriarchs (Bible) for details about Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob of the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. ... Popes buried in St. ... Patriarch of Antioch is the traditional title carried by the Bishop of Antioch. ... The Latin Patriarch of Constantinople was an office established as a result of Crusader activity in the Middle East. ... This is a List of Latin Patriarchs of Alexandria established in 1215 during the pontificate of Pope Innocent III. This titular office was abolished in 1964. ... The Latin Patriarch of Antioch was an office established in the aftermath of the First Crusade by Bohemund, the first Prince of Antioch. ...

External links

  • Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (557 words)
The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is the title given to the Latin Rite Roman Catholic Archbishop of Jerusalem.
The Latin Patriarch controlled the Latin quarter of the city of Jerusalem (the Holy Sepulchre and the immediate surroundings), and had as his direct suffragans the bishops of Lydda-Ramla, Bethlehem, Hebron, and Gaza, and the abbots of the Temple, Mount Sion, and the Mount of Olives.
The residence of the Patriarch is in the Old City of Jerusalem, while the seminary, which is responsible for the liturgical education, was moved to Beit Jala, a town 10 km south of Jerusalem, in 1936.
Wikipedia: Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem (231 words)
The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is one of the Roman Catholic "patriarchs of the east".
The Patriarchate of Jerusalem is the oldest of Eastern Catholic Patriarchates, and the only one that still follows the Latin Rite.
With the destruction of the Kingdom in 1291 the Latin Patriarchate was no longer needed, however the church continued to appoint honorary Patriarchs who were based at St. Lawrence outside the Walls Basilica in Rome.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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