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Encyclopedia > Latin Jazz

Latin jazz is the general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States.


The two main categories of Latin Jazz are Brazilian and Afro-Cuban.

Latin Jazz originated in the late 1940s when Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Kenton began to combine the rhythm section and structure of Afro-Cuban music, exemplified by Machito and his Afro-Cubans, with jazz instruments and solo improvisational ideas. Stan Kenton released an arrangement of the Afro-Cuban tune The Peanut Vendor, which is considered by many to be the first authentic Latin Jazz recording. Bossa nova is a style of Brazilian music created by Joao Gilberto and first introduced in Brazil by Gilbertos recording of Chega de Saudade, in 1958, a song written by Antonio Carlos Jobim, first released as a single, and shortly thereafter as the album by Gilberto, bearing the same... Samba is the most famous of the various forms of music arising from the amalgam of African and Portuguese music in Brazil. ... Salsa music is a diverse and predominantly Caribbean and Latin genre that is popular across Latin America and among Latinos abroad. ... Merengue can mean either: A style of music originating in the Dominican Republic; see merengue (music) A related style of dance; see merengue (dance) See also meringue, a type of dessert. ... The word Songo has a number of meanings: The Songo people of northern Angola. ... Son is a style of Cuban music which became popular in the second half of the 19th century in the eastern province of Oriente. ... Mambo is a Cuban musical form and dance style. ... The bolero is a type of dance and musical form. ... A charanga is a Cuban orchestra composed of piano, strings, vocals, flute and Cuban musical style characterized by this kind of orchestration. ... For the dance, see Cha-cha-cha (dance). ... Dizzy Gillespie in 1955 John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ... Stanley Newcomb Kenton (December 15, 1911 - August 25, 1979) led a highly innovative, influential, and often controversial American jazz orchestra. ... The term Afro-Cuban refers to descendants of African slaves in Cuba, and to cultural elements in Cuba thought to emanate from this community. ... Machito (February 16, 1912-April 15, 1984) was an influential Latin jazz musician and bandleader. ... The Afro-Cubans were a latin jazz band founded by Machito in 1940; often billed as Machito and his Afro-Cubans. ... Stanley Newcomb Kenton (December 15, 1911 - August 25, 1979) led a highly innovative, influential, and often controversial American jazz orchestra. ...


In 1947, Dizzy Gillespie collaborated with Machito conga player Chano Pozo to perform the "Afro-Cuban Drums Suite" at Carnegie Hall. This concert brought Latin-Jazz into mainstream awareness, and Pozo remained in Gillespie's band to produce "Cubana Be, Cubana Bop". 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Machito (February 16, 1912-April 15, 1984) was an influential Latin jazz musician and bandleader. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in New York City located at 57th Street and 7th Avenue. ...


In comparison to American Jazz, Latin Jazz employs straight rhythm, rather than swung rhythm. Latin Jazz rarely employs a backbeat, using a form of the clave instead. The conga, timbale, güiro, and claves are percussion instruments which often contribute to a Latin sound. A Swung note is a rhythmic device, also known as a shuffle note; it is an augmentation of the initial note in a pair and diminution of the second. ... A Swung note is a rhythmic device, also known as a shuffle note; it is an augmentation of the initial note in a pair and diminution of the second. ... The term clave may refer to Clave, a rhythmic pattern Claves, a percussion instrument This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Timbale may refer to one of the following Timbal, a kind of a kettledrum (see timbales) Timbale, a kind of dish of various ingredients baked in a round mold, also called timbale. This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Frog shaped Guiro from Japan The güiro is a percussion instrument consisting of an open-ended, hollow gourd with parallel notches cut in one side. ... Claves is a percussion instrument, consisting of a pair of short, thick wooden dowels. ...


Samba originates from nineteenth century Afro-Brazilian music such as the Lundu. It employs a modified form of the clave. Bossa Nova is a hybrid music based on Samba's rhythm but influenced by European and American music from Debussy to US jazz. Bossa Nova originated in the 1960s, largely from the efforts of Brazillians Antonio Carlos Jobim, João Gilberto, and American Stan Getz. Its most famous song is arguably The Girl from Ipanema sung by Gilberto and his wife, Astrud Gilberto. The term clave may refer to Clave, a rhythmic pattern Claves, a percussion instrument This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Antonio Carlos Jobim (born Antonio Carlos Brasileiro de Almeida Jobim, January 25, 1927 in Rio de Janeiro – December 8, 1994 in New York City), also called Tom Jobim, was a Brazilian composer, arranger, singer, pianist and perhaps the greatest legend of bossa nova. ... João Gilberto (born João Gilberto Prado Pereira de Oliveira on June 10, 1931 in the town of Juazeiro, Bahia) is a Brazilian musician and considered one of the co-creators, with Tom Jobim, of bossa nova. ... Stan Getz Stanley Getz, better known as Stan Getz (February 2, 1927 – June 6, 1991) was an American jazz musician. ... The Girl from Ipanema (Garota de Ipanema) is considered the best-known bossa nova song ever written, and was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s. ... Astrud Gilberto Astrud Gilberto (b. ...


Latin jazz music, like most types of jazz music, can be played in small or large groups. Small groups, or combos, often use the Be-bop format made popular in the 1950s in America, where the musicians play a standard melody, many of the musicians play an improvised solo, and then everyone plays the melody again. In Latin jazz bands, percussion often takes a center stage during a solo, and a conga or timbale can add a melodic line to any performance. Bebop or bop is a form of jazz which uses a fast tempo and complex improvisational techniques. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Timbale may refer to one of the following Timbal, a kind of a kettledrum (see timbales) Timbale, a kind of dish of various ingredients baked in a round mold, also called timbale. This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ...

Jazz | Jazz genres
Acid jazz - Asian American jazz - Avant-garde jazz - Bebop - Dixieland - Calypso jazz - Chamber jazz - Cool jazz - Creative jazz - Free jazz - Gypsy jazz - Hard bop
Jazz blues - Jazz fusion - Jazz rap - Latin jazz - Mini-jazz - Modal jazz - M-Base - Nu jazz - Smooth jazz - Soul jazz - Swing - Trad jazz - West coast jazz
Other topics
Musicians - Jazz standard - Jazz royalty

  Results from FactBites:
 
Latin jazz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (473 words)
Latin jazz is the general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States.
Latin Jazz originated in the late 1940s when Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Kenton began to combine the rhythm section and structure of Afro-Cuban music, exemplified by Machito and his Afro-Cubans, with jazz instruments and solo improvisational ideas.
Latin Jazz rarely employs a beat played in four, but uses a form of the clave.
Jazz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5940 words)
Jazz has roots in the combination of Western and African music traditions, including spirituals, blues and ragtime, stemming ultimately from West Africa, western Sahel, and New England's religious hymns and hillbilly music, as well as in European military band music.
At the root of jazz is the blues, the folk music of former enslaved Africans in the U.S. South and their descendants, heavily influenced by West African cultural and musical traditions, that evolved as fl musicians migrated to the cities.
Early jazz influences found their first mainstream expression in the marching band and dance band music of the day, which was the standard form of popular concert music at the turn of century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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