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Encyclopedia > Latin American music

Latin American music, sometimes simply called Latin music in The United States, includes the music of all countries in Latin America and comes in many varieties. From the simple, rural conjunto music of northern Mexico to the sophisticated habanera of Cuba, from the symphonies of Heitor Villa-Lobos to the simple and moving Andean flute. Music has played an important part in Latin America's turbulent recent history, for example the nueva canción movement. Latin-American music is very diverse, with the only truly unifying thread being the use of Latin-derived languages, predominately the Spanish language, the Portuguese language in Brazil, and to a lesser extent, Latin-derived creole languages such as that found in Haiti. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Tejano is also the name of Texans of Spanish origin. ... The habanera is a musical style or genre from Cuba with a characteristic Habanera rhythm; it is one of the oldest mainstays of Cuban music and the first of the dances from Cuba to be exported all over the world. ... Heitor Villa-Lobos (March 5, 1887 - November 17, 1959) was a Brazilian composer, possibly the best-known classical composer born in South America. ... The quena is a South American wind instrument, mostly used by Andean musicians The quena (Quechua: , sometimes also written kena in English) is the traditional flute of the Andes. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Nueva Canción (Spanish for new song) is a movement in Latin American music that was developed first in the Southern Cone of South America - Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay - during the 1950s and 1960s, but also popularized shortly after in Central America. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... Portuguese (  or língua portuguesa) is a Romance language that originated in what is now Galicia (Spain) and northern Portugal from the Latin spoken by romanized Celtiberians about 1000 years ago. ... A creole is a language descended from a pidgin that has become the native language of a group of people. ...


Although Spain is not a part of Latin America, Spanish music (and Portuguese music) and Latin American music strongly cross-fertilized each other, but Latin-American music also absorbed influences from English and United States' music, and particularly, African music. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... // In Spain, several very different cultural streams came together in the first centuries of the Christian era: the Roman culture, which was dominant for several hundred years, and which brought with it the music and ideas of Ancient Greece; early Christians, who had their own version of the Roman Rite... Portugal is internationally known in the music scene for its traditions of fado, a popular form of music that has undergone numerous mutations in the last half of the 20th century. ...

Contents

Characteristics

There are many diverse styles of Latin-American music, some of which constitutes Afro-American musical traditions, meaning that elements of European, African and indigenous music are fused. In the past, various authors have suggested extreme positions like Latin-American music being bereft of African influence, or being purely African with no European or indigenous elements, but it is now generally accepted that Latin-American music is syncretic. Specifically, Spanish song forms, African rhythms and European and African/Afro-American harmonies are major parts of tropical Latin music, as are the more modern genres such as rock, heavy-metal, punk, hip hop, jazz, reggae and R&B. Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... Heavy metal may refer to: Heavy metals, chemical elements within a particular range of atomic weights Heavy metal music, a style of music Heavy Metal (magazine), an American fantasy magazine based on the French magazine Métal Hurlant Heavy Metal (film), a 1981 animated film based on the magazine, or... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ...


The Spanish décima song form, in which there are ten lines of eight syllables each, was the basis for many styles of Latin-American song. The African influence is, however, central to Latin music, and is the basis for the Cuban rumba, the puertorican bomba and plena, the Colombian cumbia, the Brazilian samba, the Ecuadorian bomba and marimba music, or Afro-Peruvian rhythms such as Festejo, Landó, Panalivio, Socabón, Son de los Diablos or Toro Mata. In Perú there are regions where African musical influence meet and mingled withat that of the Gypsy (Roma People). Examples of this mixture are found all over the central and northern coast of Perú in rhythms such as that of the Zamacueca or Marinera and the Resbalosa. In the most rare of musical mestizages the African and Gypsy (Roma People) influence met the Andean, for example the Tondero, the Cumanana and the Peruvian Vals from the northern coast. Decima is a style of octosyllabic, 10-line poetry. ... In Cuba, Rumba is a generic term covering a variety of musical rhythms and associated dances. ... Monument to the dance and music of cumbia in El Banco. ... Samba is the most famous of the various forms of music arising from African roots in Brazil. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Festejo (from Spanish fiesta) is a festive form of Peruvian music. ... Lando can refer to: Lando Calrissian, a character from Star Wars, played by Billy Dee Williams. ... Toro Mata (The Bull Kills in Spanish) is one of the most famous folk songs in Peru, which has been recorded and developed by many different musical artists throughout its history. ... - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Romani people (as a noun, singular Rom, plural Roma; sometimes Rrom, Rroma) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ... Marinera, the most representative dance in Peru. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Romani people (as a noun, singular Rom, plural Roma; sometimes Rrom, Rroma) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... The word Andean refers to the geographic area in and around the Andes Mountains of South America, and to the indigenous peoples that inhabit the area, such as the Inca. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Other African musical elements are most prevalent in the religious music of the multifarious syncretic traditions, like Brazilian candomblé and Cuban santería. Hand drumming is significant throughout Africa The music of Africa is as vast and varied as the continents many regions, nations and ethnic groups. ... Ilê Axé Iya Nassô Oká - Terreiro da Casa Branca Candomblé is an African-inspired or Afro-Brazilian religion or cult, practiced chiefly in Brazil. ... For other uses, see Santeria (disambiguation). ...


Syncopation, a musical technique in which weak beats are accented instead of strong ones, is a major characteristic of Latin music. The African emphasis on rhythm is also important in Latin music, and is expressed through the primacy given to percussion instruments. The call-and-response song style which is common in Africa, is also found in Latin American; in this style of song, two or more elements respond to each other, musically or lyrically, one at a time. Author Bruno Nettl also cites as essentially African characteristics of Latin music the central position of instrumental music, the importance of improvisation and the "tendency to use a variety of tone colors... especially harsh, throaty singing". For other uses of the same name, see Syncopation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhythm (disambiguation). ... The term Latin percussion refers to any member of a large family of musical percussion instruments used in Latin music, which in turn is a very loosy related group of musical styles, mainly from the Latin American region, and ultimately having roots or influences in African tribal music. ... Call and response is a form of spontaneous verbal and non-verbal interaction between speaker and listener in which all of the statements (calls) are punctuated by expressions (responses) from the listener, as stated by Smitherman. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... In music, timbre is the quality of a musical note which distinguishes different types of musical instrument. ...


Those African musical techniques that were similar to European techniques were kept in Latin America, while the more dissimilar elements abandoned; in addition, the most specialized aspects of African music, such as polyrhythms, remain a part of Latin music, while the less central aspects of African music, like scale and form, have been replaced by European features. Some elements of African music, most commonly the emphasis on rhythm, have been suggested as having a biological basis, though this is no longer generally accepted among scholars and has been refuted by several studies. Bruno Nettl instead suggests that African techniques were retained because music played a central role in daily life and because African music was "in several ways more complex and more highly developed in Africa than in the Indian and Western folk cultures". Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms. ...


Indigenous music

Very little can be known for sure about music in what is now Latin America prior to the arrival of Europeans. Though there are extremely isolated peoples in the Amazon Basin and elsewhere that have had little contact with Europeans or Africans, Latin music is almost entirely a synthesis of European, African and indigenous elements. The advanced civilizations of the pre-contact era included the Mayan, Aztec and Incan empires. Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ...


The ancient Meso-American civilizations of the Maya and Aztec peoples played instruments including the tlapitzalli (a flute), teponatzli, a log drum, the conch-shell trumpet, various rattles and rasps and the huehuetl, a kettle drum. The earliest written accounts by Spanish colonizers indicate that Aztec music was entirely religious in nature, and was performed by professional musicians; some instruments were considered holy, and thus mistakes made by performers were punished as being possibly offensive to the gods. Mesoamerica is the region extending from central Mexico south to the northwestern border of Costa Rica that gave rise to a group of stratified, culturally related agrarian civilizations spanning an approximately 3,000-year period before the European discovery of the New World by Columbus. ... A tlapitzalli is a musical instrument known from pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures, particularly the Aztec. ... For other uses, see Flute (disambiguation). ... A log drum is a type of unpitched percussion instrument that creates is resonance with two toungues that are carved into a hollow box. ... Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis Strombus tricornis Strombus canarium Strombus dolomena Strombus gibberulus Strombus conomurex Strombus lentigo Strombus doxander Strombus urceus Strombus fragilis Strombus gallus Strombus dentatus Strombus marginatus Strombus raninus Strombus buvonius A conch (pronounced in the U.S.A. as konk or conch, IPA: or ) [1... A rattle is a percussion musical instrument. ... Wood rasp A rasp is a woodworking tool used for shaping wood. ... Timpani, or kettledrums, are musical instruments in the percussion family. ...


Pictorial representations indicate that ensemble performance was common. Similar instruments were also found among the Incas of South America, who played in addition a wide variety of ocarinas and panpipes. The tuning of panpipes found in Perú has similarities to instruments played in the Pacific islands, leading some scholars to believe in contact between South American and the Oceanic cultures. The ocarina (IPA: ) is an ancient flute-like wind instrument. ... Pan pipes (also known as the panflute or the syrinx or quills) is an ancient musical instrument based on the principle of the stopped pipe, consisting usually of ten or more pipes of gradually increasing length. ... - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ...


Indigenous Music in the andean countries of Ecuador, Perú and Bolivia tends to have the prominent use of flutelike and wind instruments usually made from wood and canes as well as animal bones and wings. The rhythm is usually kept with drums made out of wood and animal skins with simple rhythmic patterns of varying tempos. This is usually accompanied with rattlelike sounding instruments made out of animal claws, smalls stones or seeds. String instruments of European and Mediterranean origin have influenced local adaptations such as the Bolivian charango or the Ecuadorian mandolina. Genres in andean music are many within each country depending on region and Indian community and ethnicity within them. In Ecuador for instance, there are sanjuanitos and capishkas. In Perú there is Huaynos and in Bolivia there are Tinkus, chuntuquis and morenadas. - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ... - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ...


Origins

The arrival of the Spanish and their music heralded the beginning of Latin American music. At the time, parts of Spain and Portugal were controlled by the Moors of North Africa, who tolerated many ethnic groups. These peoples, like the Roma, Jews and Spanish Christians, each had their own styles of music, as did the Moors, that contributed to the early evolution of Latin music. Many Moorish instruments were adopted in Spain, for example, and the North African nasal, high-pitched singing style and frequent use of improvisation also spread to the all the peoples of Iberia, as did the Roma vocal trill that characterizes Roma music. From continental Europe, Spain adopted the French troubadour tradition, which by the 16th century was a major part of Spanish culture. Both ethnic Spaniards and Moors contributed to the troubadour tradition, which spawned the décima song form, which features ten lines of eight syllables each. The décima format remains an important part of Latin music, include in corridos, bolero, and vallenato. For other uses, see moor. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Languages Romany, languages of native region Religions Romanipen, combined with assimilations from local religions Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) This article is about the Indo-Aryan ethnic group. ... 19th century print of Roma musicians Typically nomadic, the Roma have long acted as wandering entertainers and tradesmen. ... For other uses, see Troubadour (disambiguation). ... Decima is a style of octosyllabic, 10-line poetry. ... The corrido is a popular narrative song and poetry form, a ballad, of the mestizo Mexican cultural area (which includes the Southwestern states of the United States, taken from Mexican sovereignty in the mid 19th Century). ... Lineart drawing of a man dancing the Bolero, with castanets For other uses, see Bolero (disambiguation). ... Vallenato, along with cumbia, is the most popular folk music of Colombia. ...


Some modern peoples of Latin America are essentially purely African, such as the Garifuna of Central America, and their music reflects their isolation from European influence. However, in general, the African slaves brought to the Americas modified their musical traditions by either adapting African performance style with European songs or vice versa, or simply learning both European song and performance style. Garífuna refers to both the people and language of the Garínagu. ...


Popular music

Argentina

Main articles: Music of Argentina, Tango music, Argentine rock, Milonga, Chacarera, Chamamé, and Southern cone music

The tango is perhaps Argentina's most famous music, becoming famous all around the world. Others include the Chacarera, Cueca, Zamba and Chamamé. More modern rhythms include El Cuarteto, and Argentine Cumbia. Argentine rock was most popular during the 60s, and still remains Argentina's most popular music. Rock en Español became first popular in Argentina, then it swept through other Latin American countries. That movement is called the "Argentine Wave." Internationally, Argentina is known mostly for the tango, which developed in Buenos Aires and surrounding areas, as well as Montevideo, Uruguay. ... Tango is a style of music that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina and Uruguay. ... Argentine rock applies loosely to any variety of rock music, blues and heavy metal from Argentina. ... Milonga is a South American form of music, as dance, as the term for the place where tango is danced. ... Chacarera is a folk dance and music originated in the northwest of Argentina in the 19th century. ... Chamamé is a folk music genre from the Argentine Mesopotamia (Littoral). Jesuit Reductions in the area impulsed a cultural growth in the area that lasted until the Jesuits were expelled by the Spanish Crown in the late 18th century. ... Chacarera is a folk dance and music originated in the northwest of Argentina in the 19th century. ... People dancing cueca in 1906 The cueca has been declared the official national dance of Chile since September 18, 1979. ... Zamba, creator-god of the Yanude people of the Cameroons, made the Earth and all its creatures except human beings. ... Chamamé is a folk music genre from the Argentine Mesopotamia (Littoral). Jesuit Reductions in the area impulsed a cultural growth in the area that lasted until the Jesuits were expelled by the Spanish Crown in the late 18th century. ... Monument to the dance and music of cumbia in El Banco. ... Argentine rock applies loosely to any variety of rock music, blues and heavy metal from Argentina. ...


Bolivia

Main articles: Music of Bolivia and Andean music

Bolivian music is perhaps the most strongly linked to its native population amongst national styles of South America. Following the nationalistic period of the 50s, Aymara and Quechua culture became more widely accepted, and these styles of folk music gradually fused in a more pop-like sound. Los Kjarkas played a pivotal role in this fusion, and in popularizing lambada in the country. Other forms of native music, such as huaynos and sayas are also widely played.cumbia is another music enjoyed today Out of all the countries Bolivia remains perhaps the most culturally linked to the indigenous peoples. ... A quena, a traditional Andean instrument Andean music comes from the approximate area inhabited by the Incas prior to European contact. ... The Aymara are a native ethnic group in the Andes region of South America; about 2. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quechuan languages. ... Los Kjarkas is a Bolivian band, one of the most popular Andean pop bands in the regions history. ... Lambada ( ) is a dance which became internationally popular in the 1980s. ... Huayño (Quechua: , Spanish: ) is a genre of popular Andean music, especially common in Peru ,Bolivia, and Argentina. ...


Brazil

Brazil is a large and diverse country with a long history of popular musical development, ranging from the early 20th century innovation of samba to the modern Música Popular Brasileira. Bossa nova is internationally well-known. Strong influences on the music of Brazil come from many parts of the world, but there are very popular regional music styles influenced by African and European forms. ... Latin jazz is the general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States. ... Tropicalismo, also known as Tropicália, is a Brazilian art movement that arose in the late 1960s and encompassed theatre, poetry and music, among other forms. ... This article is about the music Samba. ... Música Popular Brasileira, or MPB, literally Brazilian Popular Music, designates a trend in post-Bossa Nova urban popular music. ... For other uses, see Bossa nova (disambiguation). ...


Chile

The Chilean music might be argued not as diverse as elsewhere in the Americas, however, there are four main trends: Northern Chile was an important center of culture in ancient Tahuantinsuyu (Inca empire), and was afterwards dominated by the Spanish. ... A quena, a traditional Andean instrument Andean music comes from the approximate area inhabited by the Incas prior to European contact. ... People dancing cueca in 1906 The cueca has been declared the official national dance of Chile since September 18, 1979. ... Nueva Canción (Spanish for new song) is a movement in Latin American music that was developed first in the Southern Cone of South America - Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay - during the 1950s and 1960s, but also popularized shortly after in Central America. ...

  • Music from the "Big North": Which bears high resemblance with the music of Southern Perú and Western Bolivia, and it is called normally "Andean Music". This music, which reflects the spirit of the indigenous people of the Altiplano, was where the Nueva Canción originated, which is probably the best known chilean music outside Chile.
  • Music from the "Central Valley": Which is almost directly derived from that of Spain, arrived through the Vice royalty of Peru. Here it can be found the Cueca (the national dance), the Tonada, Refalosa, the Sajuriana, Zapateado, Cuando and Vals.
  • Music from the "South": This is a more complex music to trace, as it has direct influence from Spain, without any stopovers, and mixed with that of the aboriginal peoples, but which evolved far from the cultured centres of Santiago or Lima. Here there are: the Cueca Chilota, the Sirilla, the Zamba-Refalosa
  • Music from the Chilean Polynesia, which is the Rapa Nui music.

A quena, a traditional Andean instrument Andean music comes from the approximate area inhabited by the Incas prior to European contact. ... Puno, Peru, is one of larger cities of the Altiplano. ... The Canto Nuevo or Nueva Canci n is a form of folk music that developed in South America. ... People dancing cueca in 1906 The cueca has been declared the official national dance of Chile since September 18, 1979. ... The zapateado is a Spanish dance characterized by a lively rhythm puncuated by the clapping of the dancers heels. ... Vals can refer to: The Vals style of tango Several places in France; traditionally refers to the commune of Vals-les-bains This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...

Cuba

Main articles: Music of Cuba, Canto Nuevo, Chachacha, Cuban Rumba, Habanera (music), Latin jazz, Mambo (music), Nueva Trova, Salsa music, and Son Cubano

Cuba has produced many of the world's most famous styles of music and a number of renowned musicians in a variety of fields. It has been suggested that Cuban folk music be merged into this article or section. ... The Canto Nuevo or Nueva Canci n is a form of folk music that developed in South America. ... For the dance, see Cha-cha-cha (dance). ... In Cuba, Rumba is a generic term covering a variety of musical rhythms and associated dances. ... The habanera is a musical style or genre from Cuba with a characteristic Habanera rhythm; it is one of the oldest mainstays of Cuban music and the first of the dances from Cuba to be exported all over the world. ... Latin jazz is the general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States. ... Nueva trova was a movement in Cuban music that emerged in the mid-1960s. ... Salsa music is a diverse and predominantly Spanish Caribbean genre that is popular across Latin America and among Latinos abroad. ... With roots on the island of Cuba, Son Cubano is a style of music that became popular in the second half of the 19th century in the eastern province of Oriente. ...


Colombia

Main articles: Music of Colombia and Cumbia

Cumbia is originally a Colombian style of popular music, though it is now also found in other countries, especially Mexico. Vallenato and Champeta are also Colombian styles. Cumbia is related to other styles within the Atlantic coastal region such as porro, puya, mapale and bullerengue and usually come out of a mix of black, Indian and Spanish influences. Southern Pacific black music is rather different and is prominent the use of the marimba in rhythms such as currulao. Central and southern meztizo usually uses string instruments in styles such as pasillos, bambucos and sanjuaneros. Music in the llanos in the border with Venezuela evolves around the joropo and the use of arps and maracas. Modern Colombian music is a mixture of African, native Indigenous and European (especially Spanish) influences, as well as more modern American and Caribbean musical forms, such as Trinidadian, Cuban, and Jamaican. ... Monument to the dance and music of cumbia in El Banco. ...


Dominican Republic

Merengue has been popular in the Dominican Republic for many decades, and is a kind of national symbol. Bachata is a more recent arrival. Derived from the country's rural guitar music, bachata has evolved and risen in popularity over the last 40 years. Bachata, Merengue and Salsa are now equally popular among Spanish speaking Caribbean people. When the Spanish Crusaders sailed over the Atlantic they brought with them a new type of music called Hesparo, which contributed to the development of Dominican music. The Dominican Republic is known primarily for merengue, though bachata and other forms are also popular. ... Bachata, a form of music and dance that originated in the countryside and rural marginal neighborhoods of Dominican Republic. ... Merengue is a type of lively, joyful music and dance that comes from the Dominican Republic [1]. It is popular in the Dominican Republic. ... Bachata, a form of music and dance that originated in the countryside and rural marginal neighborhoods of Dominican Republic. ...


Ecuador

Main articles: Music of Ecuador and Andean music

Ecuadorian music can be classified in mestizo, Indian and black musics. Mestizo music comes out of the interrelation between Spanish and Indian music. In it there are rhythms such as pasacalles, pasillos, albazos and sanjuanitos and is usually characterized by the use of string instruments. Indian music in Ecuador is determined in varying degrees by the influence of inca quechua culture. Within it we find sanjuanitos (different form the meztizo sanjuanito), capishkas, danzantes and yaravis. Black Ecuadorian music can be classified in two main forms. The first type is black music from the coastal Esmeraldas province and is characterized by the use of the marimba. The second variety is black music from the Chota Valley in the northern Sierra, mainly known as Bomba del Chota, and is characterized by a more pronounced mestizo and Indian influence than marimba esmeraldeña. Most of these musical styles can also be played by windbands of varying sizes in popular festivals all around the country. // The Pacific coast of Ecuador is known for the amor fino, a kind of popular song, as well as a variety of dance music. ... A quena, a traditional Andean instrument Andean music comes from the approximate area inhabited by the Incas prior to European contact. ...


Haiti

Main article: Music of Haiti

Rich blend of African and European sounds; along with Cuban and Dominican influences, come together to create Haiti's diverse music. The most notable styles are Kompa and Méringue. The music of Haiti is influenced most greatly by European colonial ties and African migration (through slavery). ... Kompa (sometimes written Compas Direct, konpa direk, konpa or compa) is a musical genre as well as a dance that originates from Haïti. ... Méringue (also mereng) is a kind of Haïtian music related to twoubadou and the Dominican merengue. ...


Mexico

Main article: Mexican_music

Mariachi is the most famous and one of the many regional types of Mexican music. Trio is a three voices with two or three guitars, singing the most romantic music in Mexico, Conjunto Jarocho, with the most happy music of the Tropic as The Bamba, Etc. Mexico have composers as Agustin Lara (Lara's Theme, Granada Etc.), Mansanero (Somos novios), Jose Alfredo Jimenez (The best Ranchera Music), Juan Gabriel, Etc. - It's Impossible), They also have another famous style called Norteña becouse the origen is in the Northeast part of the country. There also exist Mexican versions of many other types of music. Including rock, Danzon, Cha Cha Cha, etc. The musical creation in Mexico is so vast and popular around the World. Mariachi music is the most well-known regional music of Mexico. ...


Nicaragua

Main articles: Music of Nicaragua and Palo de Mayo

The most popular style of music in Nicaragua is Palo de Mayo which is a dance and genre of music, as well as a festival in which the dance and music originated. Other popular music includes marimba, punta, Garifuna music, son nica, and folk music. Modern Nicaraguan music is a mixture of indigenous and European, especially Spanish, influences. ... Palo de Mayo (English: Maypole; or ¡Mayo Ya!) is a type of Afro-caribbean dance with sensual movements that forms part of the culture of several communities in the RAAS region in Nicaragua, as well as a genre of music. ... Palo de Mayo (English: Maypole; or ¡Mayo Ya!) is a type of Afro-caribbean dance with sensual movements that forms part of the culture of several communities in the RAAS region in Nicaragua, as well as a genre of music. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Punta is a type of music found primarily in Honduras, Guatemala, Belize and Nicaragua. ... Garifuna music is similarly different from the rest of Central America; the most famous form is punta. ...


Paraguay

In contrast to most of its neighbours, the national music of Paraguay is overwhelmingly European in character. ... Guarania is a style of music created in Paraguay by musician José Asunción Flores in 1925 with the purpose of expressing the character of the Paraguayan people. ... Paraguayan polka, also known as Danza Paraguaya (Paraguayan dance), is a style of music created in Paraguay in the 19th century. ...

Perú

Main articles: Music of Perú, Música criolla, and Andean music

Peruvian music is marked by Indian, Spanish and black African influences. Coastal Afro-Peruvian music is characterized by the use of the Cajón peruano. Indian music varies according to region and ethnicity. the most well known Indian style is the huayno. Mestizo music is varied and within it we find as most popular valses and marinera from the northern coast. - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ... Musica criolla is a Peruvian genre of music, which combines African, Spanish and other influences. ... A quena, a traditional Andean instrument Andean music comes from the approximate area inhabited by the Incas prior to European contact. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A cajón (Spanish for crate, drawer, or box, pronounced ka. ...


Puerto Rico

Main articles: Music of Puerto Rico, Bomba, Plena, Salsa music, Latin Jazz, and Reggaetón

Bomba and plena have been popular in Puerto Rico for a long time, while reggaetón is a relatively recent invention. The music of Puerto Rico has been influenced by African and European (especially Spanish) forms, and has become popular across the Caribbean and in some communities worldwide. ... For other uses, see Bomba (disambiguation). ... Plena is a folkloric genre native of Puerto Rico. ... Salsa music is a diverse and predominantly Spanish Caribbean genre that is popular across Latin America and among Latinos abroad. ... Latin jazz is the general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States. ... Daddy Yankee, a reggaeton artist. ...


Venezuela

Main articles: Music of Venezuela and Llanero

Llanera is Venezuelan popular music originated in the "llanos" plains, although you'll find the more upbeat and festive Gaita (music style) beat in the western area specically in the state of Zulia Venezuelan Joropo. ... A Llanero or the Llaneros is the name given to Venezuelan and Colombia cowboys and means plainsmen. ... The gaita gruoping Maracaibo 15 appearing on the Venezuelan television channel Venevision in 2004 The Gaita is the name of a venezuelan folk music from Maracaibo, Zulia state, it is normally considered a christmas-time music. ...


Nueva canción

Main article: Nueva canción

Nueva canción is a Latin American music genre most directly associated especially with Argentina and Chile. Nueva Canción (Spanish for new song) is a movement in Latin American music that was developed first in the Southern Cone of South America - Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay - during the 1950s and 1960s, but also popularized shortly after in Central America. ...


Salsa

Main article: Salsa music

Salsa is an amalgamation of Latin musical styles, especially Puerto Rican, created in the pan-Latin melting pot of New York City in the early 1970s. Salsa music is a diverse and predominantly Spanish Caribbean genre that is popular across Latin America and among Latinos abroad. ... Alternate meaning: crucible (science) The melting pot is a metaphor for the way in which heterogenous societies develop, in which the ingredients in the pot (iron, tin; people of different backgrounds and religions, etc. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Tejano Music

Main article: Tejano music

Tejano music can be categorized as a blend of Country music, Rock, and R&B born in Texas and performed in both Spanish and English with a variety of cultural influences. Tejano music (Spanish-Texan music) is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Hispanic populations of Central and Southern Texas. ... Tejano music (Spanish-Texan music) is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Hispanic populations of Central and Southern Texas. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... This article is about the genre. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ...


Most Tejanos today reside in South Texas and have their own unique form of folk and popular music, greatly influenced by yet quite distinctive from both traditional Mexican music and mainstream genres of American music. Latina Superstar Selena brought Tejano music to the mainstream and is credited frequently for bringing it to the top. A Tejano (Spanish for Texan; archaic spelling texano) is a person of Hispanic descent born and living in the U.S. state of Texas. ... South Texas is a region of the U.S. state of Texas which lies roughly south of, or beginning at, San Antonio. ... For the movie based on the life of the singer, see Selena (film). ...


Reggaetón

Main article: Reggaetón

Reggaetón has become an international phenomenon and is no longer classifiable merely as a Puerto Rican or Panamanian genre. It blends Jamaican music influences of reggae and dancehall with those of Latin America, such as bomba and plena, as well as that of hip hop. The music is also combined with rapping (generally) in Spanish. Daddy Yankee, a reggaeton artist. ... Daddy Yankee, a reggaeton artist. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... For other uses, see Bomba (disambiguation). ... Plena is a folkloric genre native of Puerto Rico. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ...


Imported styles

Imported styles of popular music with a distinctively Latin style include Latin jazz, Argentinean rock and Chilean rock, and Cuban and Mexican hip hop, all based of styles from the United States (jazz, rock and roll and hip hop). Music from non-Latin parts of the Caribbean are also popular, especially Jamaican reggae and dub, Trinidadian calypso music and Antiguan Soca. See also Spanish tinge. Latin jazz is the general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States. ... Argentinean rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Rock and roll is a style of popular broad-ranging music, known throughout the world. ... Mexican rap Mexican rap refers to a hip hop movement started in Mexico in the early 1990s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see Dub. ... For other uses of the word Trinidad, see Trinidad (disambiguation) Motto Together we aspire, together we achieve Anthem Forged From The Love of Liberty Capital Port of Spain Largest town Chaguanas [1] Official languages English Demonym Trinidadian, Tobagonian Government Republic  -  President George Maxwell Richards  -  Prime Minister Patrick Manning Independence  -  from... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... See: Soca River (pronounced Socha River), ( Slovenian original reka Soča). ... The phrase Spanish Tinge is a reference to the belief that a Latin American touch offers a reliable method of spicing the more conventional 4/4 rhythms commonly used in jazz and pop music. ...


References

  • Morales, Ed (2003). The Latin Beat. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-81018-2. 
  • Nettl, Bruno (1965). Folk and Traditional Music of the Western Continents. Prentice-Hall, Inc. ISBN 0-13-323247-6. 
  • Stevenson, Robert (1952). Music in Mexico. Thomas Y. Crowell Company. ISBN 1-199-75738-1. , cited in Nettl, p. 163.

External links

  • IberoAmerica Ensemble - Crossover string ensemble that plays
  • Latinoise - Latin Music mashup
  • LatinTake -Bilingual website focused on Latin Music

  Results from FactBites:
 
Latin American Music - MSN Encarta (2228 words)
The limited knowledge of native Latin American music before the conquest by the Spanish in the 1500s comes from the study of archaeological remains showing graphic depictions of instruments and musical life, especially of the Aztec and Maya peoples of Mesoamerica and the Inca people of the Andes (see Aztec Empire).
Musicians used a variety of scales, and music and dance were closely associated with state and religious activities, as well as with agricultural ceremonies in the Andes.
Indigenous music tends to be monophonic (consisting of a single, unharmonized melody) or heterophonic (consisting of two or more parts playing the same melody in varied ways), although in southern Peru and Bolivia the use of parallel fourths and fifths (see Harmony) is common for panpipe and flute ensembles.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Latin American music (6450 words)
Latin music is very diverse, with the only truly unifying thread being the use of Latin languages, predominately the Spanish language, the Portuguese language in Brazil, and to a lesser extent, Latin-derived creole languages such as that found in Haiti.
Afro-American music is a broad array of musical genres that arose from the synthesis of African, European and Native American music.
The African influence is, however, central to Latin music, and is the basis for the Cuban rumba, the puertorican bomba and plena, the Colombian cumbia, the Brazilian samba, the Ecuadorian bomba and marimba music, or Peruvian rythms such as Festejo, Landó, Panalivio, Socabón, Son de los Diablos or Toro Mata.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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