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Encyclopedia > Latin American Boom

The Latin American Boom (Boom Latinoamericano) was a period during the middle of the 20th century when the work of Latin American authors became widely circulated in Europe and throughout the world. Narrative innovations associated with the Boom include magical realism and marvelous realism. Its major representatives were Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, andMario Vargas Llosa, as well as Miguel Ángel Asturias, Alejo Carpentier, José Lezama Lima, and Juan Rulfo. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Latin American literature refers to the literature of Latin America. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Magic Realism (or Magical Realism) is an illustrative or literary technique in which the laws of cause and effect seem not quite to apply in otherwise real world situations. ... Julio Cortázar. ... Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mario Vargas Llosa in his youth. ... Miguel Ángel Asturias (October 19, 1899 – June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. ... Alejo Carpentier y Valmont (December 26, 1904 – April 24, 1980) was a Cuban novelist, essay writer, and musicologist who greatly influenced Latin American literature during its famous boom period. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Juan Rulfo (16 May 1917 [not 1918 as he often told people after 1936, see note below] – 7 January 1986) was a Mexican novelist, short story writer, and photographer. ...

Contents

Origins and Precursors

The origins of the Latin American Boom and its many innovations cannot be stated with finality. While some believe its techniques arose as a means of caricaturing reality, others believe they came about a way for the writer to express his unique point of view of reality.[citation needed]


It has also been said that the the Boom originated from the simple desire of writers to appear innovative, to break with past techniques and forge a style of their own, allowing them to give free rein to the imagination, and inviting readers to rediscover the love of literature.[citation needed]


Hallmarks

Magical realism

See also: Magical realism

The awestruck writings of the Chroniclers of the Indies and their sense of being in another world, conquering strange new lands unparalleled outside of chivalric romances, became a cultural touchstone for the people of Latin America. From these fantastical tales developed a new aesthetic, which matured into magical realism and (as conceived by Alejo Carpentier) marvelous realism or lo real maravilloso. According to this aesthetic, unreal things are treated as if realistic and mundane, and mundane things as if unreal. Plots, while often based on real experiences, incorporate strange, fantastic, and legendary elements, mythical peoples, speculative settings, and characters who, while plausible, could also be unreal, and combine the true, the imaginary, and the nonexistent in such a way that they are difficult to separate. Magic Realism (or Magical Realism) is an illustrative or literary technique in which the laws of cause and effect seem not quite to apply in otherwise real world situations. ... Alejo Carpentier y Valmont (December 26, 1904 – April 24, 1980) was a Cuban novelist, essay writer, and musicologist who greatly influenced Latin American literature during its famous boom period. ...


Comparing a novel written before the Boom to one written under its influence, the former is likely to strive for authenticity and reality, depicting a plain and somber reality, while the latter strives to show multiple facets of each character and each place. Boom literature breaks down the barriers between the fantastical and the mundane, transforming this mixture into a new reality.


Manipulation of time

A common literary technique of the Boom period is nonlinear chronology.[citation needed] For example, a traditional Latin American novel might begin with the protagonists meeting one another, overcoming many problems, and finally getting married. In a novel written during the Boom, the opening scenes might depict a marriage. "Later", the discovery of the fiancé's infidelity would prompt the fiancée to attempt suicide, only to be rescued by her unfaithful intended. Their love rekindled, the couple would end the novel preparing for the marriage related at the beginning. Such skewed chronologies are no longer remarkable, but they were uncommon in Latin American literature before the Boom. In the arts, the word nonlinear is used to describe events portrayed in a non-chronological manner. ...


Consequences

One of the effects of the Boom has been to encourage originality and creativity among writers.[citation needed]


Since the 1980's it has become common to speak of Post-Boom writers, most of whom were born during the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's. The Post-Boom is distinct from the Boom in various respects, most notably in the presence of female authors. Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the V-2 rocket First transistor Colossus, the worlds first totally electronic computer. ... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ...


Chronology

The Kingdom of this World is a novel by Alejo Carpentier. ... Alejo Carpentier y Valmont (December 26, 1904 – April 24, 1980) was a Cuban novelist, essay writer, and musicologist who greatly influenced Latin American literature during its famous boom period. ... Miguel Ángel Asturias (October 19, 1899 – June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. ... Pedro Páramo is a short novel written by Juan Rulfo, originally published in 1955. ... Juan Rulfo (16 May 1917 [not 1918 as he often told people after 1936, see note below] – 7 January 1986) was a Mexican novelist, short story writer, and photographer. ... The story opens with Artemio Cruz awaiting death. ... Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ... Mario Vargas Llosa in his youth. ... Rayuela (translated into English as Hopscotch) is the most famous novel by Argentine writer Julio Cortázar. ... Julio Cortázar. ... Clarice Lispector (December 10, 1920 - December 9, 1977) was a Brazilian writer. ... Paradiso may refer to: a part of The Divine Comedy Italian or latinized version for Heaven or Paradise a legendary rock club in Amsterdam a French movie by Christian Bricout a novel by Cuban writer José Lezama Lima Paradiso, Switzerland, a municipality of the Italian-speaking canton of Ticino Category... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Miguel Ángel Asturias (October 19, 1899 – June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad) is a novel by Nobel Prize winning Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that was first published in Spanish in 1967 (Buenos Aires: Sudamericana), with an English translation by Gregory Rabassa released in 1970 (New York: Harper and... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos (Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands) is a Brazilian Modernist novel. ... Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 – August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. ... Guillermo Cabrera Infante (April 22, 1929 – February 21, 2005) was a Cuban novelist, essayist, translator, and critic; in the 1950s he used the pseudonym G. Caín. ... José Donoso was a Chilean writer. ... Augusto Roa Bastos, (June 13, 1917 – April 26, 2005), was a Paraguayan novelist, widely acclaimed as one of the greatest that nation has produced. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ...

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