FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Last of the Summer Wine
Last of the Summer Wine

Last of the Summer Wine intertitle
Genre Sitcom
Created by Roy Clarke
Starring current cast:
Peter Sallis
Kathy Staff
Frank Thornton
and Brian Murphy
---
Burt Kwouk
Stephen Lewis
June Whitfield
---
Jean Alexander
Jane Freeman
Mike Grady
Josephine Tewson
Country of origin Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
No. of episodes 267 (as of September 23, 2007) (List of episodes)
Production
Running time 30 min. (approx.)
Broadcast
Original channel BBC One
Original run November 12, 1973 – Present
External links
IMDb profile

Last of the Summer Wine (Originally The Last of the Summer Wine in the pilot episode), is a BBC sitcom written by Roy Clarke. First broadcast in 1973, it is the United Kingdom's longest ever running sitcom. As of December, 2007, a 29th series is in production. It remains the longest-running comedy series in the world.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Roy Clarke (born January 28, 1930 in Goole, Yorkshire) is a British comedy writer, best known for creating Last of the Summer Wine starring Bill Owen, Peter Sallis, Brian Wilde, Kathy Staff and Dame Thora Hird amongst others (he also wrote the prequel First of the Summer Wine); and Keeping... Sallis (right) along with Brian Wilde (centre) and Bill Owen in Last of the Summer Wine Peter Sallis (b. ... Kathy Staff (born July 12, 1928) is a British actress born at Dukinfield, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom. ... Frank Thornton was born Frank Thornton Ball on January 15, 1921 at Dulwich, London, England, United Kingdom. ... Brian Murphy (born Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, September 25th 1933) is a British actor. ... Burt Kwouk (Chinese: 郭弼; pinyin: Guō Bì) (born July 18, 1930), is an actor who was born in Manchester, England because my mother happened to be there but was raised in Shanghai between the ages of ten months and seventeen years. ... Stephen Lewis, a British actor, was born in 1936 in London, England, United Kingdom. ... June Whitfield CBE 1925 in Streatham, London) is a well-known English actress. ... Jean Alexander, in a still from an interview done in 2000. ... Jane Freeman is a British actress who is best known for playing Ivy on the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine. ... Mike Grady (born February 6, 1946) is a British actor born at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom. ... Josephine Tewson (born February 26, 1939) is a British actress, best known for her role as Elizabeth Warden in Keeping Up Appearances (1990–1995). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This is a list of Last of the Summer Wine episodes, which were all written by Roy Clarke. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Roy Clarke (born January 28, 1930 in Goole, Yorkshire) is a British comedy writer, best known for creating Last of the Summer Wine starring Bill Owen, Peter Sallis, Brian Wilde, Kathy Staff and Dame Thora Hird amongst others (he also wrote the prequel First of the Summer Wine); and Keeping... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Contents

Production

Concept

Last of the Summer Wine originally premiered as an episode of BBC's Comedy Playhouse. The pilot, "Of Funerals and Fish," aired on January 4, 1973. The show's working title was The Library Mob, reflecting the library being one of the main trio's regular haunts when the series began. Created by Roy Clarke, the pilot warranted a positive enough response that a full series had been ordered before the year was up.[2] Comedy Playhouse was an occasional BBC television anthology series of the 1960s and early 1970s, consisting of one-off plays with the potential to be turned into regular sitcoms. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... A working title is the temporary name of a product or project used during its development. ... Roy Clarke (born January 28, 1930 in Goole, Yorkshire) is a British comedy writer, best known for creating Last of the Summer Wine starring Bill Owen, Peter Sallis, Brian Wilde, Kathy Staff and Dame Thora Hird amongst others (he also wrote the prequel First of the Summer Wine); and Keeping...


Filming

Last of the Summer Wine is filmed on location in Holmfirth, West Yorkshire. The location was chosen, in part, because of the influence of Barry Took, who was producing a program on working mens' clubs, one of which was in Burnlee. There, he discussed with Jimmy Gilbert a half-hour programe to be shown on Comedy Playhouse. Took told Gilbert about his recent trip to Holmfirth. Gilbert and Roy Clarke travelled to Holmfirth and both agreed they liked the location and agreed to shoot what would become the pilot for Last of the Summer Wine there.[3] Holmfirth is a small town located in the Holme Valley parish, in the Kirklees district of West Yorkshire, England. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... Barry Took (June 19, 1928 – March 31, 2002) was an English comedian, writer and television presenter. ... , Burnlee is a village in West Yorkshire, England. ... Comedy Playhouse was an occasional BBC television anthology series of the 1960s and early 1970s, consisting of one-off plays with the potential to be turned into regular sitcoms. ...


The show frequently uses actual businesses and residences in and around Holmfirth for various scenes, including Sid's Café (which was originally a paint shop dressed for effect but was turned into a real café to cash in on tourist money)[4] and Nora Batty's house. Although this has generally been good for Holmfirth, making the town a tourist destination of sorts, tensions have occasionally sprung up between Holmfirth residents and the crew. One such incident, regarding compensation to residents in 2005, made producer Alan J W Bell seriously consider the idea of not filming in Holmfirth altogether. The incident escalated to the point that Bell reportedly filmed a scene with Nora Batty putting her house up for sale.[5] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan J. W. Bell is a British television producer and director. ...


Crew

Written by: Roy Clarke
Directed by: Alan J W Bell, Sydney Lotterby, Ray Butt, Martin Shardlow
Produced by: James Gilbert, Bernard Thompson, Sydney Lotterby, Alan J W Bell. Roy Clarke (born January 28, 1930 in Goole, Yorkshire) is a British comedy writer, best known for creating Last of the Summer Wine starring Bill Owen, Peter Sallis, Brian Wilde, Kathy Staff and Dame Thora Hird amongst others (he also wrote the prequel First of the Summer Wine); and Keeping... Alan J. W. Bell is a British television producer and director. ... Sydney Lotterby is a British television producer and director with the BBC. Television comedy series of which he was producer or director included: As Time Goes By, May to December, Yes, Prime Minister, Ever Decreasing Circles, Brush Strokes, Open All Hours, Butterflies, Ripping Yarns, Porridge, Going Straight, Broaden Your Mind... Sydney Lotterby is a British television producer and director with the BBC. Television comedy series of which he was producer or director included: As Time Goes By, May to December, Yes, Prime Minister, Ever Decreasing Circles, Brush Strokes, Open All Hours, Butterflies, Ripping Yarns, Porridge, Going Straight, Broaden Your Mind... Alan J. W. Bell is a British television producer and director. ...


Plot

The most famous of the Last of the Summer Wine trios. From left to right:Peter Sallis as Norman Clegg, Brian Wilde as "Foggy" Dewhurst, and Bill Owen as "Compo" Simmonite.
The most famous of the Last of the Summer Wine trios. From left to right:Peter Sallis as Norman Clegg, Brian Wilde as "Foggy" Dewhurst, and Bill Owen as "Compo" Simmonite.

The continuing focus of Last of the Summer Wine is a trio of retired men, whose differing views of life provide much of the comic tension. Until the death of Compo in 2000 (following the death of actor Bill Owen), the trio consisted of scruffy lower-class "Compo" Simmonite, meek and timid middle-class Norman Clegg and a "third man". The character in the role of third man varied over the years (the longest standing and most famous being Walter "Foggy" Dewhurst), who was always an authoritarian figure, playing the ring-leader in the escapades of the friends. Following the death of actor Bill Owen, the trio was maintained by the addition of Billy Hardcastle, and, for a short time, became a quartet with the addition of Nora Batty's new next door neighbor, Alvin Smedley, until the departure of Billy Hardcastle in 2006, when the group became a trio again. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sallis (right) along with Brian Wilde (centre) and Bill Owen in Last of the Summer Wine Peter Sallis (b. ... Brian Wilde as prison warden Mr Barrowclough Brian Wilde (b. ... William John Owen Rowbotham (March 14, 1914 – July 12, 1999), better known as Bill Owen, was an English actor and songwriter. ... William Compo Simmonite was a character in long-running BBC TV comedy Last of the Summer Wine. ... William John Owen Rowbotham (March 14, 1914 – July 12, 1999), better known as Bill Owen, was an English actor and songwriter. ...


Important regular sub-plots in Last Of The Summer Wine revolve around Howard's love affair with Marina (which his wife, Pearl, knows about, and tolerates up to a point, mainly because it gives her something to use against him); discussions of the women's informal group: Nora, Ivy, Pearl, Edie and Glenda and, later, Aunt Roz and Nellie (with the customary unspoken battle between Nora and Ivy as to who gets the eclair and the synchronized tea-drinking); Compo's pursuit of Nora (figuring more prominently after Wally Batty is no longer on the scene, having died, although it was an element of the series to some extent even before that); penny-pinching Auntie Wainwright's machinations to sell her merchandise; Eli's gaffes; Barry's pursuit of new hobbies in an attempt to make his life less humdrum, and Tom's constant efforts to stay one step ahead of the repo-man. Another much used plot device, is an invention or idea created by one of or all of the main trio (or sometimes, by Wesley), and their disastrous attempts to put it into practice. This was particularly common during inventor Seymour's years with the series, and also common with Foggy.


Characters

Image File history File links Copyright-problem. ...

The "Summer Wine" Trio

William "Compo" Simmonite (1973-2000)

Bill Owen as "Compo" Simmonite

(Bill Owen) Working class, and dressed in scruffy trousers and wellington boots, Compo rarely (if ever) worked for a living, preferring the lazy life. According to Roy Clarke, the name derived from 'on the compo' meaning living off a compensation payment for an industrial injury.[citation needed] A great physical comedian, Compo was often the butt of jokes arising from the many dirty jobs, stunts and escapades that are a central feature of the series. Another recurring theme was Compo's lust for the ladies, especially his next-door neighbour, Nora Batty, of whose 'wrinkled stockings' he would frequently obsess. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bill Owen as Compo, along side Co-star Kathy Staff as Nora Batty Bill Rowbotham (March 14, 1914 - July 12, 1999), better known as Bill Owen, was an English actor and songwriter. ... William John Owen Rowbotham (March 14, 1914 – July 12, 1999), better known as Bill Owen, was an English actor and songwriter. ... Stocking fetishists find the sheer fabric of stockings highly enticing Black stockings Stocking fetishism is a sexual fetish relating to womens stockings. ...


Compo was killed off in 2000 following the death of Owen a year earlier. Although Compo was already seriously ill, according to Truly and Clegg, it was the sight of Nora Batty in fish-net stockings that finished him off, but he died with a smile on his face (as claimed by Truly, Clegg and Nora Batty).


Norman Clegg

Peter Sallis as Norman Clegg

(Peter Sallis) Middle-class Clegg (or Cleggy, as Compo and some of his closer friends, especially Howard, often call him) aims for a quiet respectable retirement from his career as a lino salesman, but is continually involved in the schemes of Foggy and the others. Despite having been married, Clegg fearfully shies away from women - especially the forward Marina. In many senses, Clegg represents the eye of the viewer into the escapades. As such, he is notable for his wry philosophical asides. Perfectly content reading alone in his cosy home, he also finds fascination in some of the smaller things in life - such as beetles, ironing, & warts. He is also so reserved and shy that he famously wears several layers of clothing: vest/long johns, shirt, jumper/sweater, waistcoat/suit vest, jacket/sport coat, and finally a plastic mac, which he just carries when its not windy or raining. He is also the only one of the trio that possesses a driver's certificate/license and therefore occasionally finds himself reluctantly pressured into driving on the very rare occasion that they aren't merely strolling about locally and manage to avail themselves of a vehicle sans driver. This inevitably results in a panic attack for poor Cleggy who fumbles about with the gears and pedals uncontrollably. In early episodes, Clegg was much more forthright and adventurous. Within a few years he became more retiring and cautious, and the group came to be dominated by Foggy and the "third men" that succeeded him. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sallis (right) along with Brian Wilde (centre) and Bill Owen in Last of the Summer Wine Peter Sallis (b. ... Sallis (right) along with Brian Wilde (centre) and Bill Owen in Last of the Summer Wine Peter Sallis (b. ... A linoleum kitchen floor Linoleum is a floor covering made from solidified linseed oil (linoxyn) in combination with wood flour or cork dust over a burlap or canvas backing. ...


The Third Member of the Trio

Michael Bates as Cyril Blamire

Cyril Blamire (1973-1975) (Michael Bates) The first third man, and the most childishly argumentative. He was a know-it-all with upper-class aspirations who often disassociated himself from the other two. Because of his sophisticated interests and insistence on table manners, Compo liked to refer to him as a "poof". When Bates left the cast due to illness in 1975, Blamire was written out of the series: it was said that he had left to get married. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Michael Bates (December 4, 1920 – January 11, 1978) was a British actor born in Jhansi, British India (now in Uttar Pradesh). ... Michael Bates (December 4, 1920 – January 11, 1978) was a British actor born in Jhansi, British India (now in Uttar Pradesh). ...


Walter "Foggy" Dewhurst (1976-1985, 1990-1997)

Brian Wilde as "Foggy" Dewhurst

(Brian Wilde) The successor to Blamire, Foggy is generally considered the definitive third man. A former soldier, he liked to boast of his exploits in Burma during the Second World War (in fact, he was a sign-writer). Although he considered himself very regimental and heroic, when confronted Foggy was generally meek and incompetent. He considered himself the leader of the trio, and frequently took charge of the lazy Compo and meek Cleggy. When Wilde left the series in 1985 to star in his own sitcom, it was explained that Foggy had moved to Bridlington to take over his family's egg-painting business. Returning in 1990, he claimed he had tired of a life of egg painting. In 1997, when Wilde's illness prevented him from taking part in the series, it was said that Foggy was swept away to Blackpool to be married by the local postmistress. Wilde has said in a documentary about the series that he did consider returning for Compo's funeral, but felt that it would be too much of a spectacle, with too much of the focus being on him, when the episode belonged to Owen.[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Brian Wilde as prison warden Mr Barrowclough Brian Wilde (b. ... Brian Wilde as prison warden Mr Barrowclough Brian Wilde (b. ...


Seymour Utterthwaite (1986-1990)

Michael Aldridge as Seymour Utterthwaite

(Michael Aldridge) Retired headmaster Seymour felt it was his duty in life to educate the masses, and in particular Compo and Clegg. He liked to invent, but the resulting inventions invariably led to disaster - especially for Compo, always the reluctant guinea pig. Seymour's house, outside the town, was a country home modified into a laboratory, riddled with new devices and contraptions that seldom if ever worked properly. His sister Edie (Thora Hird) always spoke very highly of him and how he was 'eductated', refusing to take into his account his continual failed inventions. His school had been dodgy at best and criminally neglectful at worst; during his tenure on the program he also ran the "Utterthwaite Postal University", which Compo derisively referred to as "Up-You". When Aldridge left the series in 1990 to care for his sick wife, Seymour was last seen leaving on a bus to take up a new job as an interim headmaster at a private school - just as previous third man Foggy returned! Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Michael William ffolliott Aldridge[1] (9 September 1920 – 10 January 1994) was an English actor. ... Michael William ffolliott Aldridge[1] (9 September 1920 – 10 January 1994) was an English actor. ... Dame Thora Hird (May 28, 1911 - March 15, 2003) was a veteran British actress born in the Lancashire seaside town of Morecambe. ...


Herbert "Truly of the Yard" Truelove (1997-present)

Frank Thornton as "Truly" Truelove

(Frank Thornton) A retired policeman, Truly is more relaxed, fun-loving, and can be more of an equal match at the local pub than his predecessors as "third man". He can also be a bit more devious with the odd practical joke or typical witty scheme, his eyes flickering with an almost devilish glint. Likewise, he can be equally sly in getting them out of a scrape or just helping out a friend. Divorced, he frequently makes disparaging comments about "the former Mrs Truelove" and, because of his previous involvement with the police, calls himself "Truly of the Yard". Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Frank Thornton was born Frank Thornton Ball on January 15, 1921 at Dulwich, London, England, United Kingdom. ... Frank Thornton was born Frank Thornton Ball on January 15, 1921 at Dulwich, London, England, United Kingdom. ...


The post-Compo era

After the death of Compo in 2000 (following the death of actor Bill Owen a year earlier in 1999), the classic "trio" format of Compo, Clegg and one other was no longer sustainable as it used to be. For the past 27 years between 1973 and 2000 at the time, the show had become more of an ensemble performance: instead of viewing all events through the eyes of the trio, recurring characters had their own, independent plotlines. Several new characters were introduced, and previous guest stars became regulars. Bill Owen as Compo, along side Co-star Kathy Staff as Nora Batty Bill Rowbotham (March 14, 1914 - July 12, 1999), better known as Bill Owen, was an English actor and songwriter. ...


Tom Simmonite (2000-present)

Tom Owen as Tom Simmonite

The first direct replacement for Compo was his son, Tom Simmonite (played by Bill Owen's real life son, Tom). Like his father, Tom often dresses in rags and inherits his father's taste in big and burly women (he initially believes Nora Batty has a crush on him after she attempts to console him regarding his father's death). Tom arrives shortly after his father's death, having never met his father, hoping to find his father is rich. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tom Owen (born April 8, 1949) is a British actor who is best know for playing Tom Simonite on the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine. ... Tom Owen (born April 8, 1949) is a British actor who is best know for playing Tom Simonite on the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine. ...


Tom was teamed up with Clegg and Truly for the second half of the 2000 series but it was quickly realised he would not be a suitable replacement for his father. Tom stayed on with the series, however, and was made a supporting character, often teaming him up with Smiler working at Auntie Wainwright's shop.


Billy Hardcastle (2001-2006)

Keith Clifford as Billy Hardcastle

The next attempt to find a direct replacement for Compo was in the form of Billy Hardcastle (played by Keith Clifford). The character was first introduced in the 1999 series as a guest star and also appeared in the 1999 New Years special and a guest role in the 2000 series. He was made a regular character due to his popularity in the 2001 series. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Keith Clifford is a British actor who plays Billy Hardcastle on the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine. ... Keith Clifford is a British actor who plays Billy Hardcastle on the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine. ...


Billy believes he is a direct descendent of Robin Hood. His first appearance on the show showed him attempting to recruit a band of Merry Men to go with him while he robs from the rich to give to the poor. When Billy was teamed with Clegg and Truly, much of the humor Compo previously brought to the series returned in Billy's child-like demeanour, although an element of physical humor was still lacking in the series. Much of his dialogue bemoaned the domestic presence of "the wife" or "the wife's sister". For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ...


Alvin Smedley (2003-present)

Brian Murphy as Alvin Smedley

Alvin Smedley (played by Brian Murphy) was introduced in the 2003 series as Nora Batty's new next door neighbour following the death of Compo. When Tom's former acquaintance, Mrs. Avery, gives up the lease she owns on Compo's old house, Alvin purchases it. Although he publicly claims to hate Nora Batty, he feels it is his duty to try and bring some joy to her life, often in the form of practical jokes similar to those Compo once played on her. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Brian Murphy (born Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, September 25th 1933) is a British actor. ... Brian Murphy (born Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, September 25th 1933) is a British actor. ...


With the introduction of Alvin, the stunts, and an element of physical humour returned to the series. At the same time, Peter Sallis's role as Clegg was highly reduced on the series, and several episodes featured a trio of Truly, Billy, and Alvin, with Clegg only appearing briefly in the episode. Other episodes saw the trio abandoned in favour of a quartet featuring Clegg, Truly, Billy, and Alvin.


As Of 2007

Keith Clifford left following the 27th series of 2006; the character of Billy Hardcastle was written out of the series, although no explanation has so far been made for his absence (as has been with the case with many other characters that no longer appear). With Billy's departure, the main line-up has finally returned straight to a trio and back in the traditional vein of the meek deep thinker (Clegg), the figure of authority (Truly), and the child-like other (Alvin).


Peter Sallis's role on the series continues to be reduced, however, and his absence was often filled by supporting characters, most notably Entwistle (played by Burt Kwouk), a character originally introduced in 2003 to replace the character of Wesley Pegden following the death of actor Gordon Wharmby. Burt Kwouk (Chinese: 郭弼; pinyin: Guō Bì) (born July 18, 1930), is an actor who was born in Manchester, England because my mother happened to be there but was raised in Shanghai between the ages of ten months and seventeen years. ... Gordon Wharmby (November 6, 1933 - May 18, 2002) was a British actor born in Salford, Lancashire, United Kingdom. ...


Recurring Characters

The series is filled out by many other local characters, many of which have come and gone over the years, and whose roles have been greatly expanded over time, with the series over the past decade or so becoming very much an ensemble piece. In particular, in the 1990s, scenes of "the ladies" coffee meetings, discussing the oddities of men and the world in general, became very popular with viewers and were soon expanded to become a staple of each episode. Last of the Summer Wine has featured a large cast of supporting characters over the years - some background characters, and some featuring heavily in the series. ...


Episodes

Last of the Summer Wine is currently the longest running comedy programme in Britain. As of September 2007, the show has run for 267 episodes since 1973, including a number of Christmas and New Years specials. In addition, a 29th season is currently in production to debut in 2008. This is a list of Last of the Summer Wine episodes, which were all written by Roy Clarke. ...


Spin-off

A spin-off prequel series, First of the Summer Wine, ran for two series and thirteen episodes in 1988-1989. The series used different actors to follow the exploits of the main characters in their youth, with Peter Sallis playing the father of his own regular character in Last of the Summer Wine. First of the Summer Wine (FOTSW) was a prequel to Last of the Summer Wine (LOTSW), also written by Roy Clarke. ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... First of the Summer Wine (FOTSW) was a prequel to Last of the Summer Wine (LOTSW), also written by Roy Clarke. ...


Praise and criticism

Last of the Summer Wine continues to bring in a large audience for BBC One. The series premeire of the 28th series brought in an average of 3.2 million viewers, giving BBC One a 18.6% share of viewers in the 6:20 time slot and growing its audience from 2.7 million to 3.4 million over the 30 minutes. The show was beaten for the night only by Channel 4's Big Brother, which had 3.6 million viewers at 9:00 pm but a lower share of viewers for its time slot.[6] For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Big Brother is a reality television series broadcast in the United Kingdom and Ireland on Channel 4 and E4. ...


The series was praised for portraying older people in a positive and active light, and not just a stereotypical representation of the retired. It was also praised for its clever and, at times, philosophical writing, and for being a family-friendly show in terms of viewing.[7]


The BBC has, reportedly, wanted to find a reason to cancel the series for years on the basis of its appeal to a mostly older audience in favour of a new series which would appeal to a younger demographic. However, the show remains too popular for it to justify cancelling, with even reruns on UKTV Gold receiving ratings of as much as five million viewers per episode.[8] UKTV Gold, (previously known as UK Gold until March 8, 2004), is a British television channel that shows mainly classic BBC entertainment programmes. ...


In more recent years, the series has been criticized for being tired and very formulaic. Many have complained that the cast has grown too large, to the detriment of the dialogue and plotlines. However the series remains popular with the Public.[citation needed]


In 2004 the series came 14th in a high profile BBC poll to find Britain's Best Sitcom.[7] Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Britains Best Sitcom was a poll conducted in 2003 and 2004 by the BBC to identify the United Kingdoms best situation comedy. ...


A 29th Series and a documentary to mark the shows 35th anniversary of the show are currently in production.


Awards and nominations

Awards

National Television Awards The National Television Awards is a British television awards ceremony, sponsored by the ITV network and initiated in 1995. ...

  • Most Popular Comedy Programme -- 1999

Nominated

British Academy Film Awards The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ...

  • Best Situation Comedy Series -- 1974
  • Best Situation Comedy Series -- 1980
  • Best Comedy Series -- 1983
  • Best Comedy Series -- 1984
  • Best Comedy Series -- 1986

National Television Awards The National Television Awards is a British television awards ceremony, sponsored by the ITV network and initiated in 1995. ...

  • Most Popular Comedy Programme -- 2000
  • Most Popular Comedy Programme -- 2003
  • Most Popular Comedy Programme -- 2004

DVD Releases

Title Release dates
Region 1 Region 2
The Complete Series 1 and 2 -- September 2, 2002
The Complete Series 3 and 4 -- July 26, 2004
The Complete Series 5 and 6 -- March 5, 2007
The Complete Series 7 and 8 -- March 3, 2008

Although no complete series have been released in region one, two "best of" collections have been released, one simply entitled Last of the Summer Wine, released in 2003, which includes early episodes from the Blairme and Foggy years of the show, and Last of the Summer Wine: Vintage 1995 released in 2004, which focuses on series 17 (when Foggy was in the show for a 2nd time) and specials about the show and Thora Hird . Region 1, Region 2 and Region 3 redirect here. ... Region 1, Region 2 and Region 3 redirect here. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

First of the Summer Wine (FOTSW) was a prequel to Last of the Summer Wine (LOTSW), also written by Roy Clarke. ... This is a list of Last of the Summer Wine episodes, which were all written by Roy Clarke. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Yorkshire colloquialisms, (sometimes referred to as Yorkshireisms), are colloquialisms or slang commonly spoken in Yorkshire, England. ...

References

  1. ^ Mangan, Lucy. "Cable girl: why has the Summer Wine lasted?", The Guardian, 2007-11-06. Retrieved on 2007-12-04. 
  2. ^ British TV Comedy: Last of the Summer Wine Accessed November 3, 2007
  3. ^ The Summer Wine Story: Why was it filmed in Holmfirth?. Summer Wine Online. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  4. ^ Last of the Summer Wine. Nostalgia Central. Retrieved on 2007-12-05.
  5. ^ Atkinson, Neil. "Is it the Last of Summer Wine?", The Huddersfield Daily Examiner, 2005-08-16. Retrieved on 2007-12-04. 
  6. ^ Oatts, Joanne. "3.2 million enjoy 'Summer Wine'", Digital Spy, 2007-07-17. Retrieved on 2007-12-04. 
  7. ^ a b "Series Profile: Last of the Summer Wine", The Insider, May 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-04. 
  8. ^ Pogson, Tony. "Summer Wine still gladdens the heart", Huddersfield Daily Examiner, 2005-03-11. Retrieved on 2007-12-04. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Digital Spy (or DS as it is often known by its users) is a British media and entertainment website, noted for its extensive Big Brother coverage and forums. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Last of the Summer Wine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1559 words)
Last of the Summer Wine's most famous line-up consisting of Compo (Bill Owen), Foggy (Brian Wilde) and Clegg (Peter Sallis).
Last of the Summer Wine, written by Roy Clarke, is a British sitcom, which has run longer than any other comedy series in the world, now in its twenty-sixth series.
This was not to last; she threw him out of their flat and disappeared from the series after a couple of years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m