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Encyclopedia > Last Supper
The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci.
The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci.

In the Christian Gospels, the Last Supper (also called the Lord's Supper or Mystical Supper) was the last meal Jesus shared with his Twelve Apostles and disciples before his death. The Last Supper has been the subject of many paintings, perhaps the most famous by Leonardo da Vinci. The Last Supper can mean: The Last Supper. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1988x1016, 367 KB) Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) - The Last Supper (1495-1498) File links The following pages link to this file: The Last Supper (Leonardo) ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1988x1016, 367 KB) Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) - The Last Supper (1495-1498) File links The following pages link to this file: The Last Supper (Leonardo) ... This article is about the painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For... A disciple (from the Latin discipulus, a pupil) is one who receives instruction from another; a scholar; a learner; especially, a follower who has learned to believe in the truth of the doctrine of his teacher, and implies that the pupil is under the discipline of, and understands, his teacher... A diagram of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre based on a german documentary, claimed to be the site of Calvary and the Tomb of Jesus. ... This article is about the painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ...


In the course of the Last Supper, and with specific reference to taking bread and wine, Jesus told his disciples, "Do this in remembrance of me", (1 Corinthians 11:23–26). Other events and dialogue are recorded in the Synoptic Gospels and the Gospel of John. Many Christians describe this as the "Institution of the Eucharist" (see Maundy Thursday). (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ...


The vessel which was used to serve the wine is sometimes called the Holy Chalice, and has been the one of the supposed subjects of Holy Grail literature in Christian mythology. This article is about the Christian relic. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... Christian mythology is the body of traditional narrative associated with Christianity. ...

Contents

New Testament

Earliest Description

The Apostle Paul was the first to write of the Last Supper. He wrote: The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles... Paul of Tarsus (b. ...

For I received from the Lord what I also passed on to you: The Lord Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, "This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me." In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me." For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes. (1 Corinthians 11:23-26)

Paul states he learned of the ceremony directly from the Lord, that is to say, by revelation. Revelation of the Last Judgment by Jacob de Backer Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown, which could not be known apart from the unveiling (Goswiller 1987 p. ...


Location

Main article: Cenacle

According to tradition, the Last Supper took place in what is called today The Room of the Last Supper on Mount Zion, just outside of the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem, and is traditionally known as The Upper Room. This is based on the account in the Synoptic Gospels that states that Jesus had instructed a pair of unnamed disciples to go to the city to meet a man carrying a jar of water, who would lead them to a house, where they were to ask for the room where the teacher has a guest room. This room is specified as being the upper room, and they prepare the passover there. It is not actually specified where the city refers to, and it may refer to one of the suburbs of Jerusalem, such as Bethany; the traditional location is not based on anything more specific in the Bible, and may easily be wrong. The traditional location is an area that, according to archaeology, had a large Essene community, adding to the points which make several scholars suspect a link between Jesus and the group (Kilgallen 265). Cenacle is the traditional Latin term for the Upper Room, or the site of The Last Supper. ... Cenacle is the traditional Latin term for the Upper Room, or the site of The Last Supper. ... Mount Zion (Hebrew: ‎ transliteration: Har Tziyyon - Height) is the ancient name of a mountain in jerusalem southe of the old city. ... ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... The Essenes were a Jewish religious group that flourished from the 2nd century BC to the 1st century AD. Many separate, but related religious groups of that era shared similar mystic, eschatological, messianic, and ascetic beliefs. ...


Saint Mark's Syrian Orthodox Church in Jerusalem is another possible site for the room that the Last Supper was held in and contains a Christian stone inscription testifying to early reverence for that spot. Certainly the room they have is older than that of the coenaculum (crusader - twelfth century) and as the room is now underground the relative altitude is correct (the streets of first century Jerusalem were at least twelve feet (3.6metres) lower than those of today, so any true building of that time would have even its upper storey currently under the earth). They also have a revered Icon of the Virgin Mary, reputedly painted from life by St Luke.


Bread and wine

The Last Supper (1594) by Tintoretto.
The Last Supper (1594) by Tintoretto.

In the course of the Last Supper, according to Paul and the Synoptic Gospels (but not the Gospel of John), Jesus divides up some bread, says a prayer (see also grace), and hands the pieces to his disciples, saying this is my body. He then takes a cup of wine, (known as the Holy Grail), offers another prayer, and hands it around, saying this is my blood of the everlasting 'covenant', which is poured for many . Finally, according to Paul and Luke, he tells the disciples do this in memory of me. These words signify the whole point in the final meal. Jesus wants the disciples to remember him, and his ways even in death, because he knows that they will again be reunited in the kingdom of God. Image File history File links Tintosoup. ... Image File history File links Tintosoup. ... Tintoretto (real name Jacopo Comin; September 29, 1518 - May 31, 1594) was one of the greatest painters of the Venetian school and probably the last great painter of the Italian Renaissance. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the epistles, or letters, included in the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... Grace is a name for any of a number of short prayers said before a meal, thanking God for it and asking for His blessing on it, in folk practices of Christianity and other religions. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ...


During Jewish Passover meals, the wine was usually consumed during the eating of the bread, but here it occurs after. This may indicate that the event was not the official Passover dinner, and hence more in line with John's chronology (Brown et al. 626), although the meal could easily have been altered during the Last Supper for symbolic/religious purposes, or simply because the Gospel writers did not have complete knowledge of Jewish practice, as suggested by their chronologies.


If we follow Corinthians cited above or the Synoptic Gospels, it appears that the cup of wine, which is said to be drunk "after having eaten", refers to either the third cup of the Passover Seder, which is held during grace after meals, or the fourth, on which the Hallel is recited. Birkat Hamazon (ברכת המזון), known in English as the Grace After Meals (lit. ... Hallel (Hebrew: הלל Praise [God]) is part of Judaisms prayers, a verbatim recitation from Psalms 113-118, which is used for praise and thanksgiving that is recited by observant Jews on Jewish holidays. ...


This institute has been regarded by Christians of different denominations as the first Eucharist or Holy Communion. Jesus' behaviour may be derived from a passage in the Book of Isaiah, where Isaiah 53:12 refers to a blood sacrifice that Moses is described in Exodus as having made in order to seal a covenant with God Exodus 24:8. Scholars often interpret the description of Jesus' behaviour as him asking his disciples to consider themselves part of a sacrifice, where Jesus is the one due to physically undergo it (Brown et al. 626). For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ...


Betrayal

Depiction of Last Supper in the Cathedral of Freiburg.
Depiction of Last Supper in the Cathedral of Freiburg.

According to the Canonical Gospels, during the meal, Jesus revealed that one of his Apostles would betray him and that would be Judas. Despite the assertions of each Apostle that it would not be he, Jesus is described as reiterating that it would be one of those who were present, and goes on to say that there shall be woe to the man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born (Mark 14:20-21). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 555 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Last Supper from the Cathedral of Freiburg. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 555 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Last Supper from the Cathedral of Freiburg. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For... For other uses, see Son of man (disambiguation). ...


It is only in the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 26:23-26:25) and The Gospel of John (John 13:26-13:27) where Judas Iscariot is specifically singled out. This is the very moment poignantly portrayed in Leonardo da Vinci's The Last Supper. The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel according to John is the fourth gospel document in the sequence of the canon of the New Testament, and scholars agree it was the fourth to be written down. ... For other uses, see Judas. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... This article is about the painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ...


Abandonment

As well as the prediction of betrayal, the four canonical gospels recount that Jesus knew the Apostles (disciples) would fall away. Simon Peter states that he will not abandon Jesus even if the others do, but Jesus tells him that Peter would deny Jesus thrice before the cock had crowed twice. Peter is described as continuing to deny it, stating that he would remain true even if it meant death, and the other apostles are described as stating the same about themselves. According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... For other uses, see Rooster (disambiguation). ...


Sermon

After the meal, according to John, Jesus gave an extended sermon to his disciples John 14-16. This sermon is sometimes referred to as the farewell discourse of Jesus, and has historically been considered a source of Christian doctrine, particularly on the subject of Christology. Amongst the Canonical Gospels, John is unusual in the complexity of its Christology (which has led to questions about its authenticity), and this sermon portrays one of the most complex Christological descriptions in John. Although ostensibly an address by Jesus to his disciples, some scholars[citation needed] have theorized that the chapter is written with events concerning the later church in mind, particularly that of the 2nd century. Jesus is presented as explaining the relationship between himself and his followers, and seeking to model this relationship on his own relationship with God. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A sermon is an oration by... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christology is a field of study... El Grecos rendition of John the Apostle shows the disputed author of the Johannine works as a young man. ...


The chapter introduces the extended metaphor of Jesus as the true vine. God is described as the vine tender, and his disciples are said to be branches, which must 'abide' in him if they are to 'bear fruit'. The disciples are warned that barren branches are pruned by the vinedresser. This image has been influential in Christian art and iconography. The disciples are reminded of the love of God for Jesus, and of Jesus for the disciples (especially the beloved disciple), and are then instructed to love one another in the same manner. It goes on to speak of the greatest love as being the willingness to lay down life for one's friends, and this passage has since been widely used to affirm the sacrifice of martyrs and soldiers in war, and is thus often seen on war memorials and graves. This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... The The Vine was a parable given by Jesus in the New Testament (John). ... The phrase disciple whom Jesus loved or Beloved Disciple is used several times in the Gospel of John. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ...


The sermon goes on to talk of Jesus' sending "another paraclete" (Greek: άλλο Παράκλητον), a "Spirit of Truth" that will testify about Jesus (John 14:16). Paraclete means "comforter", "counsellor", or "advocate", and is traditionally understood as referring to the Holy Spirit. When the dogmatic definition of the Trinity became necessary in the 3rd century, the passage became central to the arguments about the role of the Holy Spirit. Arguments about the filioque clause which partly caused the East-West Schism between the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church, centered around this verse. In some sectors of the early Jesus movement the paraclete was considered a more human figure, and, in the 2nd century, Montanus claimed that he himself was this paraclete that had been promised. Look up Paraclete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... In Christian theology the filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning and [from] the son in Latin) is a heavily disputed addition to the Nicene Creed, that forms a divisive difference in particular between the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions. ... The Second Ecumenical Council whose contributions to the Nicene Creed lay at the heart of the famous theological disputes underlying the East-West Schism. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... For the first century movement surrounding Jesus of Nazareth, see Early Christianity The Jesus movement was the major Christian element within the hippie counterculture, or, conversely, the major hippie element within the Christian Church. ... Montanism was an early Christian sectarian movement of the mid-2nd century A.D., named after its founder Montanus. ...


Remembrances

Main article: Holy Thursday
The Last Supper from the Heilig-Blut-Altar by Tilman Riemenschneider in St-Jakobskirche, Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Germany.
The Last Supper from the Heilig-Blut-Altar by Tilman Riemenschneider in St-Jakobskirche, Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Germany.

The institution of the Eucharist at the Last Supper is remembered by Roman Catholics as one of the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary, and by most Christians as the "inauguration of the New Covenant", mentioned by the prophet Jeremiah, fulfilled at the last supper when Jesus said, "Take, eat; this [bread] is My Body; which is broken for you. Par-take of the cup, drink; this [wine] is My Blood, which is shed for many; for the remission of sins". Other Christian groups consider the Bread and Wine remembrance as a change to the Passover ceremony, as Jesus Christ has become "our Passover, sacrificed for us" (I Corinthians 5:7). Partaking of the Passover Communion (or fellowship) is now the sign of the New Covenant, when properly understood by the practicing believer. In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter, the day on which the Last Supper is said to have occurred. ... Image File history File links Germany_Rothenberg_Last_Supper. ... Image File history File links Germany_Rothenberg_Last_Supper. ... Tilman Riemenschneider (1460 – 1531) was a German sculptor who lived in Würzburg. ... Town Hall Square of Rothenburg A famous street in Rothenburg at Koboldzellersteig and Spittalgasse Town wall of Rothenburg Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a town in the district of Ansbach of Mittelfranken (Middle Franconia), the Franconia region of Bavaria, Germany, well known for its well-preserved medieval old town. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian Holy Day. ...


These meals evolved into more formal worship services and became codified as the Mass in Catholic Church, and as the Divine Liturgy in the Orthodox Churches. At these liturgies, Catholics and Eastern Orthodox celebrate the Sacrament of the Eucharist. The name Eucharist is from the Greek word eucharistia which means thanksgiving. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ...


Each major division of Christianity has formed a different theology about the exact meaning and purpose of these remembrance ceremonies, but most of them contain similarities.


Agape

Main article: Agape feast
Jacopo Bassano's the Last Supper.
Jacopo Bassano's the Last Supper.

Early Christianity observed a ritual meal known as the "agape feast"[1] These love feasts were apparently a full meal, with each participant bringing their own food, and with the meal eaten in a common room. They were held on Sundays which became known as the Lord's Day, to recall the resurrection, the appearance of Christ to the disciples on the road to Emmaus, the appearance to Thomas and the Pentecost which all took place on Sundays after the Passion. Jude, and the apostle Paul referred to these as "your love-feasts", by way of warning (about "who shows up" to these). Following the meal, as at the Last Supper, the apostle, bishop or priest prayed the words of institution over bread and wine which was shared by all the faithful present. In the later half of the first century, especially after the martyrdom of Peter and Paul, passages from the writings of the apostles were read and preached upon before the blessing of the bread and wine took place. The Agape feast was one term used for the Eucharistic celebration of the early Christians. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1188x650, 131 KB) Here we have an picture this is the last supper and I mean the last supper God had before the day he died {which was nailed to a cross}at the present of the dinner famous artist/ painter... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1188x650, 131 KB) Here we have an picture this is the last supper and I mean the last supper God had before the day he died {which was nailed to a cross}at the present of the dinner famous artist/ painter... Jacopos The Last Supper Jacopo Bassano (also known as Giacomo da Ponte, c. ... // Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Early Christianity is the Christianity of the three centuries between the death of Jesus ( 30) and the First Council of Nicaea (325). ... The Agape feast was one term used for the Eucharistic celebration of the early Christians. ... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have... Look up Jude in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Some echoes of the "agape meal" may remain in fellowship, or potluck dinners held at some churches. An assortment of food dishes at a church potluck. ...


Name

Simon Ushakov's icon of the Mystical Supper.
Simon Ushakov's icon of the Mystical Supper.

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Last Supper is referred to as the Mystical Supper, because it is the Institution of the Sacred Mysteries (Sacrament) of the Body and Blood of Christ. The scene is often depicted above the Holy Doors in Orthodox churches, because it is here that the faithful stand to receive Holy Communion. The name indicates the Orthodox belief that the institution is more than a simple "memorial meal", but is the actual mystical union of the faithful with God. Image File history File links Last Supper 1685 Uploaded from http://www. ... Image File history File links Last Supper 1685 Uploaded from http://www. ... Saviour Not Made by Hands, written by Ushakov for the Troitse-Sergiyeva Lavra in 1658, is a key painting of the Stroganov School of Muscovite icon-painting. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The term Sacred Mysteries is used in the Eastern Churches to refer to what the Western Church calls Sacraments and Sacramentals. ... 17th-century iconostasis of Prophet Elias church, Yaroslavl. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ...


Another variation of the name of the service is "The Lord's Supper". This name is often used by the churches of minimalist traditions, such as those strongly influenced by Zwingli. Some echoes of the "agape meal" may remain in fellowship, or potluck dinners held at some churches. The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... Zwinglis Successor Zwinglis successor, Heinrich Bullinger, was elected on December 9, 1531, to be the pastor of the Great Minster at Zürich, a position which he held to the end of his life (1575). ... An assortment of food dishes at a church potluck. ...


Many Christians speak of the institution of the Eucharist as the "inauguration of the New Covenant", mentioned by the prophet Jeremiah, and believe this prophesy was fulfilled at the Last Supper, when Jesus said, "Take, eat; this [bread] is My Body; which is broken for you. Partake of the cup, drink; this [wine] is My Blood, which is shed for many; for the remission of sins". Other Christian groups consider the Bread and Wine remembrance as a change to the Passover ceremony, as Jesus Christ has become "our Passover, sacrificed for us" (1 Corinthians 5:7). Partaking of the Passover Communion (or fellowship) is considered to be the sign of the New Covenant, when properly understood by the practicing believer. Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... For prophecy in the context of revealed religions see Prophet. ... This article is about the Christian Holy Day. ...


In another variation of the name of the service is "The Lord's Supper". This name is often used by the churches of minimalist traditions, such as those strongly influenced by Zwingli. The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... Zwinglis Successor Zwinglis successor, Heinrich Bullinger, was elected on December 9, 1531, to be the pastor of the Great Minster at Zürich, a position which he held to the end of his life (1575). ...


The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints commonly refers to the service as The Sacrament. In their services, LDS churches typically substitute water for the wine used by Jesus at the Last Supper. For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... LDS is a TLA that can mean: Latter-Day Saint, a person who is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Latter Day Saint, a person who identifies with the Latter Day Saint religious movement (Not to be confused with Latter Day Saint (note: without...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... The Acts of John is a 2nd-century Christian collection of narratives and traditions, well described as a library of materials [1], inspired by the Gospel of John, long known in fragmentary form. ...

References

  • Brown, Raymond E. An Introduction to the New Testament Doubleday 1997 ISBN 0-385-24767-2
  • Brown, Raymond E. et al. The New Jerome Biblical Commentary Prentice Hall 1990 ISBN 0-13-614934-0
  • Bultmann, Rudolf The Gospel of John Blackwell 1971
  • Kilgallen, John J. A Brief Commentary on the Gospel of Mark Paulist Press 1989 ISBN 0-8091-3059-9
  • Linders, Barnabus The Gospel of John Marshal Morgan and Scott 1972

External links

This article is about the magical and religious movement stemming from the teachings of Hermes Trismegistus. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

 
 

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