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Encyclopedia > Laryngitis
Laryngitis
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 J04.0, J37.0
ICD-9 464.0-464.4, 476.0-476.1
DiseasesDB 29347
MedlinePlus 001385
eMedicine ent/353  ent/354
MeSH D007827

Laryngitis is an inflammation of the larynx. It causes hoarse voice or the complete loss of the voice because of irritation to the vocal folds (vocal cords). The scientific name is Larynx bacillus. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following codes are used with International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... // J00-J99 - Diseases of the respiratory system (J00-J06) Acute upper respiratory infections (J00) Acute nasopharyngitis (common cold) (J01) Acute sinusitis (J02) Acute pharyngitis (J03) Acute tonsillitis (J04) Acute laryngitis and tracheitis (J05) Acute obstructive laryngitis (croup) and epiglottitis (J050) Acute obstructive laryngitis (croup) (J051) Acute epiglottitis (J06) Acute upper... // J00-J99 - Diseases of the respiratory system (J00-J06) Acute upper respiratory infections (J00) Acute nasopharyngitis (common cold) (J01) Acute sinusitis (J02) Acute pharyngitis (J03) Acute tonsillitis (J04) Acute laryngitis and tracheitis (J05) Acute obstructive laryngitis (croup) and epiglottitis (J050) Acute obstructive laryngitis (croup) (J051) Acute epiglottitis (J06) Acute upper... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The Disease Bold textDatabase is a free website that provides information about the relationships between medical conditions, symptoms, and medications. ... MedlinePlus (medlineplus. ... eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base that was founded in 1996. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... An abscess on the skin, showing the redness and swelling characteristic of inflammation. ... Voicebox redirects here. ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, screaming. ... // Bold textItalic text The vocal folds, also known popularly as vocal cords, are composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched horizontally across the larynx. ...


Laryngitis is categorized as acute if it lasts less than a few days.[1] Otherwise it is categorized as chronic, and may last over 3 weeks. In medicine, an acute disease is a disease with either or both of: a rapid onset; a short course (as opposed to a chronic course). ... In medicine, a chronic disease is a disease that is long-lasting or recurrent. ...


Causes

  • viral infection
  • bacterial or fungal infection
  • inflammation due to overuse of the vocal cords
  • excessive coughing

Treatments

Correct treatment depends on a correct diagnosis of the underlying cause of laryngitis. The most prevalent cause of a missed diagnosis of laryngeal cancer is a belief that persistent hoarseness is due to laryngitis.[citation needed] Should hoarseness last for more than 3 weeks, one should consult an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat physician) for an examination including direct visualization of the vocal cords. This examination may also detect the presence of vocal cord nodules, a structural change resulting in persistent hoarseness or loss of voice. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Otolaryngology is the branch of medicine that specialises in the diagnosis and treatment of ear, nose, throat, and head & neck disorders. ... A vocal fold nodule reduces or obstructs the ability of the vocal folds to create the rapid changes in air pressure which generate human speech. ...


If laryngitis is due to a viral cause:

  • Ibuprofen and aspirin may help alleviate fever and some of the discomfort associated with laryngitis.
  • Patients are advised to avoid speaking when possible. They are instructed to speak softly, but to avoid whispering, which further strains the voice.[2]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Laryngeal Paralysis in Dogs (539 words)
Laryngeal paralysis is a disorder in which the nerves that control the muscles and cartilage that open and close the larynx (voicebox) do not function properly, causing voice changes and difficulty with eating or breathing.
The inherited form of laryngeal paralysis in Dalmatians is often part of a larger condition called 'laryngeal paralysis-polyneuropathy complex.' In cases where the condition is congenital (inherited), it is recommended that the affected dog not be used for breeding.
Laryngeal paralysis can also be the result of damage to the nerves and/or muscles of the larynx due to a bite wound or other trauma.
Larynx - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (909 words)
The glottis is the laryngeal area of most interest to speech researchers, as it is widely believed to be where most of the control of phonation and pitch goes on.
Sensation is transferred by the superior laryngeal nerve (glottis and supraglottis) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (subglottis and muscles), both branches of the vagus nerve.
Acute laryngitis is the sudden inflammation and swelling of the larynx.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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