FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Larkin Goldsmith Mead
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Larkin Goldsmith Mead (January 3, 1835 - 1910) was an American sculptor. Jump to: navigation, search January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Sculptor redirects here. ...


He was born at Chesterfield, New Hampshire, and was a pupil (1853-1855) of Henry Kirk Brown. During the early part of the American Civil War he was at the front for six months, with the army of the Potomac, as an artist for Harper's Weekly; and in 1862-1865 he was in Italy, being for part of the time attached to the United States consulate at Venice, while William D. Howells, his brother-in-law, was consul. He returned to America in 1865, but subsequently went back to Italy and lived at Florence. Chesterfield is a town located in Cheshire County, New Hampshire. ... Jump to: navigation, search The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-three mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... Harpers Weekly Inauguration Number 1897 Harpers Weekly (A Journal of Civilization) was an American political magazine published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916. ... Jump to: navigation, search Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′ N 12°19′ E, population 271,663 (census estimate 2004-01-01). ... Jump to: navigation, search Founded 59 BC as Florentia Region Tuscany Mayor Leonardo Domenici (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  102 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 356,000 almost 500,000 3,453/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 43°47 N 11°15 E...


His first important work was a statue of Ethan Allen, now at the State House, Montpelier, Vermont. His principal works are: the monument to President Lincoln, Springfield, Illinois; Ethan Allen (1876), National Hall of Statuary, Capitol, Washington; an heroic marble statue, The Father of Waters, New Orleans; and Triumph of Ceres, made for the Columbian Exposition, Chicago. Ethan Allen (January 10, 1738 – February 12, 1789) was an early American revolutionary and guerrilla leader during the era of the Vermont Republic and the New Hampshire Grants. ... Montpelier, Vermont Montpelier is the capital of Vermont, a state of the United States of America. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809–April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Location in Illinois Founded  -Incorporated 1819 {{{incorporated}}}  County Sangamon County Mayor Timothy Davlin Area  - Total  - Water 156. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ...


His brother William Rutherford Mead (1846-1928) was a well-known architect. William Rutherford Mead (1846-1928) was an American architect, a part of the famed McKim, Mead, and White firm. ...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Jump to: navigation, search Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


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Larkin Goldsmith Mead - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (265 words)
Larkin Goldsmith Mead (January 3, 1835 - 1910) was an American sculptor.
His principal works are: the monument to President Lincoln, Springfield, Illinois; Ethan Allen (1876), Statuary Hall, Capitol, Washington; an heroic marble statue, The Father of Waters, New Orleans; and Triumph of Ceres, made for the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, and a large bust of Lincoln in the Hall of Inscriptions at the Vermont State House.
His brother William Rutherford Mead (1846-1928) was a well-known architect.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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