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Encyclopedia > Large denomination bills in U.S. currency

Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. This article is about general United States currency. ... A denomination is a unit of currency. ... Obverse of the $1 bill Reverse of the $1 bill The U.S. one dollar bill ($1) is a denomination of U.S. currency. ... Obverse of $2 bill Reverse of $2 bill The United States two dollar bill ($2) is a denomination of U.S. currency. ... The U.S. five dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ... The old and new ten dollar bill The U.S. ten dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. ... The U.S. twenty dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. ... 2004 Federal Reserve note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve note - Reverse The U.S. fifty dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... The U.S. hundred dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. ...

Front of a 1934 $100,000 bill
Front of a 1934 $100,000 bill
Back of a 1934 $100,000 bill
Back of a 1934 $100,000 bill
Front of a 1918 $10,000 bill
Front of a 1918 $10,000 bill
Back of a 1918 $10,000 bill
Back of a 1918 $10,000 bill

At one time, however, it also included five larger denominations. Shown here is a $100,000 Gold certificate from 1934. High-denomination currency was prevalent from the very beginning of U.S. Government issue (1861). $500, $1,000, and $5,000 interest bearing notes were issued in 1861, and $10,000 gold certificates arrived in 1865. There are many different designs and types of high-denomination notes. United States Currency, 1934 $100,000 bill with Woodrow Wilson Portait File links The following pages link to this file: Large denomination bills in U.S. currency ... United States Currency, 1934 $100,000 bill with Woodrow Wilson Portait File links The following pages link to this file: Large denomination bills in U.S. currency ... United States Currency, 1934 $100,000 bill (back) File links The following pages link to this file: Large denomination bills in U.S. currency ... United States Currency, 1934 $100,000 bill (back) File links The following pages link to this file: Large denomination bills in U.S. currency ... From http://www. ... From http://www. ... From http://www. ... From http://www. ... A picture of a gold certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The high-denomination bills were issued in a small size in 1929, along with the $1 through $100 denominations. Their designs were as follows:

The reverse designs featured abstract scrollwork with ornate denomination identifiers. All were printed in green, except for the $100,000. The $100,000 is an odd bill, in that it was not generally issued, and printed only as a gold certificate of Series of 1934. These gold certificates (of denominations $100, $1,000, $10,000, and $100,000) were issued after the gold standard was repealed and gold was compulsorily purchased by presidential order of Franklin Roosevelt on March 9, 1933 (see United States Executive Order 6102), and thus were only used for intra-government transactions. They are printed in orange on the back, and are illegal to own. All known pieces are in government museums. This series was discontinued in 1940. The other bills are printed in black and green as shown by the $10,000 example at right. The name Mckinley redirects here. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... 1922 U.S. gold certificate The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold and currency issuers guarantee, under specified rules, to redeem notes in that amount of gold. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Executive Order 6102 was signed on April 5, 1933 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to call for the confiscation of all privately held gold coins and bullion in the U.S. The order begins: By virtue of the authority vested in me by Section 5(b) of the Act of...


Printing of other high-denomination bills was discontinued in 1946, but the bills continued to circulate until 1969, when they were officially withdrawn. The $5,000 and $10,000 effectively disappeared well before then: there are only about 200 $5,000 and 300 $10,000 bills known, of all series since 1861. Most of the $10,000 bills are due to the preservation of 100 ($1,000,000) of them by Benny Binion, the owner of Binion's Horseshoe casino in Nevada. For many years, they were displayed in a glass case in the casino. The case is no longer there, and the bills were sold to collectors. 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Benny Binion at the 1979 World Series of Poker Lester Ben Benny Binion (November 20, 1904 - December 25, 1989) was a well known casino owner and poker enthusiast. ... Johnny Moss, Chris Wills, Amarillo Slim, Jack Binion, and Puggy Pearson outside the Horseshoe at the 1974 World Series of Poker Binions Horseshoe (now the Binions Gambling Hall & Hotel) is a hotel and casino located in downtown Las Vegas, Nevada on the Fremont Street Experience. ... Official language(s) None Capital Carson City Largest city Las Vegas Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 7th 286,367 km² 519 km 788 km 0. ...


Circulation of high-denomination bills was halted in 1969 by executive order of President Richard Nixon, in an effort to combat organized crime. 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... An executive order is an edict issued by a member of the executive branch of a government, usually the head of that branch. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... A criminal organization is a group run by criminals to further their illegal activities. ...


For the most part, these bills were used by banks and the Federal Government for large financial transactions. This was especially true for gold certificates from 1865 to 1934. However, the introduction of the electronic money system has made large-scale cash transactions obsolete; when combined with concerns about counterfeiting and the use of cash in unlawful activities such as the illegal drugs trade, it is unlikely that the U.S. government will re-issue large denomination currency in the future. Electronic money (also known as digital money, electronic currency, digital currency or internet money) refers to money which is only exchanged electronically. ... A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ... These lollipops, above, were found to contain heroin when inspected by the US Drug Enforcement Administration In jurisdictions where legislation restricts or prohibits the sale of certain popular drugs, it is common for an illegal drugs trade to develop. ...


Fake denominations

Fake $200 bill of G.W. Bush.
Fake $200 bill of G.W. Bush.

Other denominations of bills have been created by individuals as practical jokes or as genuine attempts at counterfeiting. In September 2003, an unknown individual in North Carolina used a $200 bill (with George W. Bush's likeness on it) at a Food Lion to purchase $150 in groceries. The cashier obligingly cashed the fake bill and presented the perpetrator with $50 in change. There have been other $200 incidents, including one where a man bought a $2.12 sundae at a Dairy Queen in Danville, Kentucky with a $200 bill (with George Bush on it) and received $197.88 back in change. In 1997, in Wichita, Kansas, a man tried to pass two freshly-printed $16 bills at an airport hotel. Image File history File linksMetadata Bushbill1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bushbill1. ... A popular practical joke is to completely block someones doorway while they are in the room. ... Look up September in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 805 km 240 km 9. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Strawberry Sundae In the United States, one of the most familiar ice cream desserts is the ice cream sundae. ... Dairy Queen is a fast-food restaurant franchise that was founded in 1940. ... Danville is a city located in Boyle County, Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 225 km 610 km 1. ... Nickname: Air Capital Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... Official language(s) None Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 15th 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² 211 mi; 340 km 400 mi; 645 km 0. ...


In March 2004, Alice Regina Pike attempted to use a $1,000,000 bill with a picture of the Statue of Liberty on the front to purchase $1671.55 in goods from a Wal-Mart in Covington, Georgia, for which she was then arrested. Various $3 bills have been released, generally poking fun at politicians or celebrities such as Bill Clinton, Michael Jackson, or Hillary Clinton; this likely stems from the American idiom "queer as a three-dollar bill". March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Covington is a city located in Newton County, Georgia. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958) also known as the King of Pop or Wacko Jacko, is an American musician who has written music spanning many styles, including R&B/soul, pop, disco, funk, rock, and hip hop. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, serving her freshman term since January 3, 2001. ...


External links

  • Fake $200 bill
  • Fake Million Dollar Bill
United States currency and coinage
Topics: Federal Reserve Note | United States Note | United States coinage | United States dollar
Currency: $1 | $2 | $5 | $10 | $20 | $50 | $100 | Larger denominations
Coinage: Cent | Nickel | Dime | Quarter | Half Dollar | Dollar

 
 

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