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Encyclopedia > Laomedon

In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione. Tithonus is also described by most sources as Laomedon's eldest legitimate son; and most sources omit Ganymedes from the list of Laomedon's children. Laomedon's wife is variously named (Strymo, Leucippe, Zeuxippe, Placia, Thoƶsa). He also begot a bastard son named Bucolion on the nymph Abarbarea, as recounted by Homer in the Iliad. Greek mythology comprises the collected narratives of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy (Turkey) Troy (Greek Τροία Troia also Ἰλιον; Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city, scene of the Trojan War, part of which is described in Homers Iliad, an epic poem in Ancient Greek, composed in the 8th or 7th century BC, but containing older... In Greek mythology, Ganymede (Greek: Γανυμήδης, Ganumêdês)) was a divine hero whose homeland was the Troad. ... In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and son of Laomedon. ... In Greek mythology, two people went by the name Astyoche. ... In Greek mythology, Lampus was a son of King Laomedon of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Hicetaon was a son of King Laomedon of Troy. ... Clytius is the name of many people in Greek mythology: A son of Laomedon in Homers Iliad, book 10. ... In Greek mythology, the most prominent Hesione was a Trojan princess, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy, sister of Priam and wife of King Telamon of Salamis. ... In Greek mythology, Tithonus was Eos lover. ... In Greek mythology, Bucolion was a son of the Trojan king Laomedon and the nymph Calybe. ... In Greek mythology, Abarbarea was a naiad. ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The Iliad (Greek Ιλιάς, Ilias) tells part of the story of the siege of the city of Ilium, i. ...


Laomedon owned several horses with divine parentage, with whom Anchises secretly bred his own mares. Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The Horse (Equus caballus) is a sizeable ungulate mammal, one of the seven modern species of the genus Equus. ... In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and either Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme (a Naiad and daughter of Simois, the river god). ...


According to one story, Laomedon's son, Ganymedes, was kidnapped by Zeus, who had fallen in love with the beautiful boy. Laomedon grieved for his son. Sympathetic, Zeus sent Hermes with two horses so swift they could run over water. Hermes also assured Laomedon that Ganymedes was immortal and would be the cupbearer for the gods, a position of much distinction. However, Ganymedes is more usually described as a son of Tros, an earlier King of Troy and grandfather of Laomedon. Laomedon himself was son of Ilus, son of Tros. Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles Hermēs (pronounced HUR-mees; Greek: Έρμης: pile of marker stones), in Greek mythology, is the god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators, literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures and invention and... In Greek mythology, King Tros of Dardania (1375 BC - 1328 BC), son of Erichthonius from whom he inherited the throne and the father of three named sons: Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymede. ... Ilus son of Tros Ilus (Ilos in Greek) is in Greek mythology the founder of the city called Ilion (Latinized as Ilium) to which he gave his name. ...


Poseidon and Apollo, having offended Zeus, were sent to serve King Laomedon. He had them build huge walls around the city and promised to reward them well, a promise he then refused to fulfill. In vengeance, before the Trojan War, Poseidon sent a sea monster to attack Troy. In Greek mythology, Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor by the armies of the Achaeans, following the kidnapping (or elopement) of Helen of Sparta by Paris of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea. ...


Laomedon planned on sacrificing Hesione to Poseidon in the hope of appeasing him. Heracles (along with Oicles and Telamon) rescued her at the last minute and killed both the monster and Laomedon and Laomedon's sons, save Podarces, who saved his own life by giving Heracles a golden veil Hesione had made (and therefore was afterwards called Priam, from priamai 'to buy'). Telamon took Hesione as a war prize and she gave birth to Teucer by him. Statue of Heracles In Greek mythology, Heracles, or Heraklês (glory of Hera, Ηρακλης) was a divine hero, the demigod son of Zeus and Alcmene, and stepson of Alcmenes rightful husband and great-grandson of Perseus. ... In Greek mythology, Oicles (also Oikleiês, Oecles, or Oecleus) was an Argive king, father of Amphiaraus, son of Mantius and grandson of Melampus. ... In Greek mythology, Telamon, son of Aeacus, King of Aegina and Endeis and brother of Peleus, accompanied Jason as one his Argonauts, and was present at the hunt for the Calydonian Boar. ... In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and son of Laomedon. ... Two figures in Greek mythology had the name Teucer: The son of Hesione and Telamon, Teucer fought with his half-brother, Ajax the Great, in the Trojan War and is the legendary founder of the city Salamis on Cyprus. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Laomedon (387 words)
Laomedon was the son of Ilus and a king of Troy, two of his sons were Tithonus and Podarces (Priam) who was later to be king.
Laomedon asked the advice of an oracle to rid his land of these hardships, the oracles reply was, Laomedon had to sacrifice his own daughter (Hesione) to the sea-monster.
Laomedon without hesitation had Hesione chained to a rock, she lay trembling with fear, awaiting her grizzly end, to be devoured as sacrifice to this monster of the sea.
Laomedon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (347 words)
In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione.
Laomedon himself was son of Ilus, son of Tros.
Heracles (along with Oicles and Telamon) rescued her at the last minute and killed both the monster and Laomedon and Laomedon's sons, save Podarces, who saved his own life by giving Heracles a golden veil Hesione had made (and therefore was afterwards called Priam, from priamai 'to buy').
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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