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Encyclopedia > Lanhydrock House
Lanhydrock in 1880. Gatehouse at the front left, church on the hill to the rear.

Lanhydrock House is a large country mansion near Bodmin in Cornwall, UK. It is situated in extensive grounds (3.6 km²) above the River Fowey and is today managed by the National Trust. ImageMetadata File history File links Lanhydrock_by_Morris_(1880). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Lanhydrock_by_Morris_(1880). ... Map sources for Bodmin at grid reference SX074667 The town of Bodmin lies in the centre of Cornwall, in the United Kingdom, along the western edge of Bodmin Moor. ... Motto: Onan hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Cornwall, England Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Area - Total - Admin. ... The River Fowey is a river in Cornwall, England. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, NT or The Trust, is an organisation which works to preserve and protect coastline, countryside and buildings in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. ...


Much of the present house dates back to Victorian times, but some sections are more than 200 years older, dating back to about 1620. Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of Great Britain is considered the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Events September 6 - English emigrants on the Mayflower depart from Plymouth, England for the future New England and arrive at the end of the year. ...


The estate belonged to the Augustinian priory of St Petroc at Bodmin, but the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the 1530s saw it passed into private hands. In 1620, wealthy merchant Sir Richard Robartes acquired the estate and began building Lanhydrock House, designed to a four-sided layout around a central courtyard, and constructed of grey granite. Robartes died in 1624 but work on the building was continued by his son John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor, a notable public figure who served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... Saint Petroc (sometimes spelt Petrock, also Pedrog in Welsh and Perreux in French) (c. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1538 and 1541, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic monastic institutions in England and took them to himself, as the... Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor (1606-1685) succeeded his father, Richard Robartes, as Baron Robartes of Truro in May 1634. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ...

The gatehouse.
The gatehouse.

During the 18th century, the east wing of the house was demolished leaving the U-shaped plan seen today, but in 1881 a major fire destroyed the south wing and caused extensive damage to the central section. Of the main house, only the north wing, with its 29 m Long Gallery, survived intact, though the original gatehouse also dates back to the mid 17th century. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (472x708, 218 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Lanhydrock House Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (472x708, 218 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Lanhydrock House Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


Most of the current building, therefore, dates from late Victorian times. The second Lord Robartes (later the 6th Viscount Clifden) rebuilt the house to meet the needs of his large family, appointing local architect Richard Coad to design and supervise most of the work, Coad having worked as assistant to George Gilbert Scott on earlier work (1857) at Lanhydrock. Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect, also known as a building designer, is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction, whose role is to guide decisions affecting those building aspects that are of aesthetic, cultural or social concern. ... Richard Coad (13 February 1825-1 November 1900) was a 19th century English architect. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 - March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches and cathedrals. ...


In 1953, the house and approximately 400 acres (1.6 km²) of parkland were given to the National Trust by the 7th Viscount Clifden. The public tour is one of the longest at any National Trust house, and takes in the service rooms, nurseries and some servants' bedrooms, as well as main reception rooms and family bedrooms. In 2004 is was one of the Trust's ten most visited paid entry properties, with over 200,000 visitors. 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ...

Church
Church

The house is situated next to a small church, Lanhydrock Parish Church (dedicated to St Hydrock), which in parts dates back to late 15th century. It has an attractive garden. There are formal areas around the house and the hill behind is planted with a fine selection of shrubs and trees. ImageMetadata File history File links Lanhydrock_House. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Lanhydrock_House. ... A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


Lanhydrock was the main setting for a 1996 film version of Twelfth Night directed by Trevor Nunn, and starring Helena Bonham-Carter as Olivia. Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Sir Trevor King (born 14 January 1940) is a loser and film director. ... Helena Bonham Carter (born May 26, 1966; surname: Bonham Carter) is a British actress renowned for her portrayal of pre- and early 20th century female characters, particularly in Merchant Ivory films. ...


External link

  • Lanhydrock information at the National Trust
  • Lanhydrock Garden - information on garden history
  • 25 photographs of Lanhydrock at westcountryviews.co.uk

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lanhydrock House - definition of Lanhydrock House in Encyclopedia (354 words)
Lanhydrock House is a large country mansion near Bodmin in Cornwall, England.
During the 18th century, the east wing of the house was demolished leaving the U-shaped plan seen today, but in 1881 a major fire destroyed the south wing and caused extensive damage to the central section.
In 1953, the house and approximately 400 acres (162 hectares) of parkland were given to the National Trust by the 7th Viscount Clifden.
Lanhydrock House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (452 words)
Lanhydrock House is a large country mansion near Bodmin in Cornwall, UK.
In 1953, the house and approximately 400 acres (1.6 km²) of parkland were given to the National Trust by the 7th Viscount Clifden.
Lanhydrock was the main setting for a 1996 film version of Twelfth Night directed by Trevor Nunn, and starring Helena Bonham-Carter as Olivia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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