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Encyclopedia > Landslide victory

In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. Politics, sometimes defined as the art and science of government[1], is a process by which collective decisions are made within groups. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ...


Landslides can occur when one candidate or party is perceived as far superior to their opponents, through unfair elections, or as a result of particular voting systems which may produce distorted or disproportionate results. See bloc voting, and the unanimous 2002 re-election of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, criticised by external observers as a joke. Bloc voting (or block voting) (also called Plurality-at-large) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single constituency. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was the President of Iraq from 1979 until he lost power over Iraq when American troops arrived in Baghdad on April 9, 2003. ...


The opposite of a landslide is a wipeout. An election might be judged to have a lopsided or wipeout result if the winning party wins far more seats than its share of the votes would justify, winning most if not all of the seats. ...


Examples

Canada

Results of the 1935 PEI general election. ... The Prince Edward Island Liberal Party is a centrist political party in the province of Prince Edward Island, Canada. ... Walter Maxfield Lea (February 10, 1874-January 10, 1936) was a Prince Edward Island politician. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... In the 1987 election in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, the Liberal Party swept to victory, for the first time since 1970, in a massive landslide by winning all 58 seats in the legislature. ... The New Brunswick Liberal Association (NBLA) is one of the two major political parties in the Canadian provice of New Brunswick. ... British Columbia riding map showing the winning parties and their vote percentage of each riding. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually refered to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ...

Hong Kong

  • The 1991 election: A coalition of the United Democrats of Hong Kong and the Meeting Point, together with other smaller parties, groups and independents in the pro-democracy camp, getting 17 of the 18 geographical constituency seats.
  • The 1995 election: The Democratic Party, together with other smaller parties, groups and independents in the pro-democracy camp, getting 17 of the 20 geographical constituency seats.

The Democratic Party (民主黨) is a pro-democracy and liberal, political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Pro-democracy camp (民主派) is a frequently used jargon by the media and within the academics to refer to the politicians and social activists in Hong Kong who advocate faster pace of democratisation and implementation of universal and equal suffrage. ... The Democratic Party (民主黨, Hanyu: mín zhǔ dǎng, Jyutping: man zyu dong) is a pro-democracy and liberal political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Pro-democracy camp (民主派) is a frequently used jargon by the media and within the academics to refer to the politicians and social activists in Hong Kong who advocate faster pace of democratisation and implementation of universal and equal suffrage. ...

United Kingdom

In general, any British general election which results in a majority of over 100 seats tends to be described as a landslide. Notable examples include:

Labour's general election victory in 2001 with an overall majority of 167 was dubbed "the quiet landslide" by the media. Though the Government did score a very high majority, public interest in the election was not excited and, unlike most of the landslide results listed above, there was little change from the previous election and no change of governing party. The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party (the SDP) to form a new party which would become... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... The Conservative Party is the second-largest political party in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ... In the United Kingdom the term National Government is in an abstract sense used to refer to a coalition of some or all major political parties. ... Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


Landslides are relatively common in British electoral history, and this is partly as a result of the first-past-the-post electoral system. Relatively small differences in numbers of popular votes cast be amplified by the eventual result (for instance, Labour achieved a 66-seat majority in 2005 despite securing only 35% of the vote); conversely, parties can poll very highly and achieve disproportionately low numbers of MPs. In 1992, for example, sitting Conservative Prime Minister John Major polled more votes than any party leader before or since, but was returned with a precarious majority of just 21. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Plurality. ... The UK general election, 1992 was held on April 9, 1992, and was the fourth victory in a row for the Conservatives. ...


United States

Popular votes

The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th (1921-1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. ... James Cox can refere to one of several different individuals in history. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... FDR redirects here. ... Alfred M. Landon Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 – October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, notable nationally for his 1936 nomination as the Republican opponent of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a United States politician who was a founding figure in the modern American conservatism movement in the USA. Goldwater personified the shift in balance in American politics from the Northeast to the West. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...

Electoral votes


  Results from FactBites:
 
Landslide victory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (822 words)
In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election.
Landslides can occur when one candidate or party is perceived as far superior to their opponents, through unfair elections, or as a result of particular voting systems which may produce distorted or disproportionate results.
The opposite of a landslide is a wipeout.
Landslide victory - definition of Landslide victory in Encyclopedia (102 words)
In politics, a landslide victory (short form: landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election.
Landslides can occur when one candidate or party is perceived as far superior to their opponents, or by imperfect voting methods.
See bloc voting, and the unanimous 2002 re-election of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, criticised by many external observers as unfair.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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