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Encyclopedia > Lancelot Blackburne

Lancelot Blackburne (sometimes Blackburn or Blackbourne), (10 December 1658 - 23 March 1743) was an English clergyman, who became Archbishop of York, and - in popular legend - a pirate. December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... English in common usage may refer to: English, a West Germanic language spoken mainly in the United States, the UK as well as its former colonies, and used as an international lingua franca in many parts of the world a citizen of England, the country the English people, an ethnic... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... A pirate digging for treasure. ...


He was described by Horace Walpole, in his Memories, as "...Blackbourn, the jolly old Archbishop of York, who had all the manners of a man of quality, though he had been a buccaneer, and was a clergyman; but he retained nothing of his first profession, except his seraglio." Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... A seraglio is the sequestered living quarters used by wives and concubines in a Turkish Muslim household, from an Italian variant of Turkish sarayı, meaning palace, enclosed courts. Topkapi Palace (Topkapı Sarayı) is the main Ottoman palace in Istanbul, now a museum. ...

Contents


Early life

He was born in London, a younger brother of Richard Blackburne. He attended Westminster School, and in 1676 entered Christ Church College, Oxford. He graduated in 1680, was ordained, and travelled to the West Indies. In January 1684 he was granted an MA by the university; at this time, he is known to have been in Nevis. A popular story recounts that he spent these years sailing with buccaneers, either as their chaplain or as a pirate himself; there is little evidence either way, although an intriguing record of 1681 notes that he was paid £20 by Charles II for "secret services". The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Motto: Dat Deus Incrementum Westminster School (in full, The Royal College of St. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... Christ Church (in full: The Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII) is one of the largest and wealthiest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Nevis is an island in the Caribbean, whose name is derived from an original Spanish name given by Christopher Columbus. ... For the strike aircraft see Blackburn Buccaneer. ... A chaplain is a priest or a member of the clergy serving a group of people who are not organized as a mission or church. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... The name Charles II is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles the Fat (also known as Charles II of France and Charles III of the Holy Roman Empire) Charles II of England Charles II of Naples Charles II of Navarre Charles II of Romania Charles II...


Church career

He returned to England during 1684, marrying Catherine Talbot (the elder sister of William Talbot) in September, and shortly thereafter took up the first of a set of church posts.


In 1691 he became canon of Exeter, and in 1705 Dean, succeeding William Wake, whose patronage would later stand him in good stead, and in 1715 Archdeacon of Cornwall. In 1716, he travelled to Hanover as the personal chaplain to George I, and the next year became Bishop of Exeter. As Bishop, he was active in the House of Lords; among others, he supported the repeal of the Occasional Conformity Act. Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender October 3 - Treaty of Limerick which guaranteed civil rights to catholics was signed. ... Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... William Wake (1657-1737), English archbishop, was born in Blandford Forum, Dorset, on January 26 1657, and educated at Christ Church, Oxford. ... // Events September 1 - King Louis XIV of France dies after a reign of 72 years, leaving the throne of his exhausted and indebted country to his great-grandson Louis XV. Regent for the new, five years old monarch is Philippe dOrléans, nephew of Louis XIV. September - First of... // Events Natchez, one of the oldest towns on the Mississippi, founded. ... Map of Germany showing Hanover Hanover (German: Hannover [haˈnoːfɐ]), on the river Leine, is the capital of the state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... George I can refer to: King George I of Great Britain and Ireland King George I of Greece This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Bishop of Exeter is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Exeter in the Province of Canterbury. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Occasional Conformity Act was an Act of the British Parliament to prevent Nonconformists and Roman Catholics from from taking occasional communion in the Church of England in order to become eligible for public office under the Corporation Act and the Test Act. ...


In 1724 he became Archbishop of York, a position he held until his death. Whilst he continued to be politically active, he often neglected his spiritual duties; he appears to have not carried out any confirmations, and stopped ordaining priests after ten years. Instead, he kept apartments in London - in Downing Street - and spent much time at the royal court. Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... this website is rubbish!!!!! ...


His career was controversial, with rumours that he had secretly married George I to his mistress; the Dictionary of National Biography mentions "his reputation for carnality" and "the laxity of his moral precepts", whilst Brewer's Rogues, Villains and Eccentrics comments that "[his] behaviour was seldom of a standard to be expected of an archbishop. In many respects it was seldom of a standard to be expected of a pirate." One local legend in York even claimed that his butler was Dick Turpin! George I can refer to: King George I of Great Britain and Ireland King George I of Greece This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Dictionary of National Biography (or DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history. ... Dick Turpin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


He died on 23 March 1743; his wife had died in 1726, leaving no children. However, it was often claimed that he fathered Thomas Hayter; there is no conclusive evidence either way, though he did leave a sizable portion of his estate to Hayter. March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ...


Description by Walpole

In a 1780 letter to David Dalrymple, Horace Walpole gave a lengthy description of Blackburne: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ...

He was perfectly a fine gentleman to the last, to eighty-four; his favourite author was Waller, whom he frequently quoted. ... I often dined with him, his mistress, Mrs. Conwys, sat at the head of the table, and Hayter, his natural son by another woman, and very like him, at the bottom, as chaplain: he was afterwards Bishop of London. I have heard, but do not affirm it, that Mrs. Blackbourne, before she died, complained of Mrs. Conwys being brought under the same roof. To his clergy he was, I have heard, very imperious. One story I recollect, which showed how much he was a man of this world: and which the Queen herself repeated to my father. On the King's last journey to Hanover, before Lady Yarmouth came over, the Archbishop being With her Majesty, said to her, "Madam, I have been with your minister Walpole, and he tells me that you are a wise woman, and do not mind your husband's having a mistress."


Preceded by:
Offspring Blackall
Bishop of Exeter
1717–1724
Succeeded by:
Stephen Weston
Preceded by:
William Dawes
Archbishop of York
1724–1743
Succeeded by:
Thomas Herring


The Bishop of Exeter is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Exeter in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ...


References

Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
MSS - Portland (London) Collection, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, Sookholme Exchange, University of Nottingham (5299 words)
Draft approved by Lancelot Shadwell of Lincoln's Inn, 31 Jul. 1811; and by Forster Cooke and Frere of Lincoln's Inn, 18 Aug. 1811.
Pl E12/5/2/13 9.11.1813 Abstract of title of the 4th Duke of Portland to the manor of Sookholme, Nottinghamshire, with opinion of counsel; 9 Nov. 1813 (17 ff, paper) Abstract of the title (commencing 10 Feb. 1726/7) of the Most Noble William Henry Cavendish Scott Duke of Portland to the manor and lands of Soulkholme, Nottinghamshire.
Appended copy opinions of Lancelot Shadwell of Lincoln's Inn, 9 Nov. 1813; of Richard Parsons, 19 Nov. 1828; and of William Hanbury Jones of Lincoln's Inn, 10 Feb. 1829.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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