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Encyclopedia > Lance

The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. The name is derived from lancea, Roman auxiliaries' javelin, although according to the OED, the word may be of Iberian origin. A reenactor troupe armed with a variety of polearm known as a Halberd. ... Hunting spear and knife, from Mesa Verde National Park. ... The lancea was the Roman auxiliaries short javelin. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Look up Javelin on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Javelin can refer to several things: For the spear-like object,used as a thrown weapon in ancient times see Javelin Ancient For the modern athletic discipline see Javelin throw. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... The Iberian language describes a linguistic group identified with the Iberian civilization (7th century BC – 1st century BC), formed in the eastern and south-eastern regions of the Iberian peninsula. ...


A lance in the original sense is a light throwing spear, or javelin. The English verb to launch "fling, hurl, throw" is derived from the term (via Old French lancier), as well as the more rare or poetical to lance. Paradoxically, the term from the 17th century came to refer specifically to spears not thrown, used for thrusting by heavy cavalry, and especially in jousting. A thrusting spear which is used by infantry is usually referred to as a pike. The first use of the lance in this sense was made by the Sarmatian and Parthian cataphractes from ca. the 3rd century BC. Look up Javelin on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Javelin can refer to several things: For the spear-like object,used as a thrown weapon in ancient times see Javelin Ancient For the modern athletic discipline see Javelin throw. ... An army unit consisting of mounted soldiers are commonly known as cavalry. ... Jousting is a staple entertainment at Renaissance Fairs. ... A modern recreation of a mid-17th century company of pikemen. ... Sarmatian Cataphract Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4. ... Parthia[1] (Middle Persian: اشکانیان Ashkâniân) was a civilization situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as regions of the modern countries of Armenia, Iraq, Georgia, eastern Turkey, eastern Syria, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, the Persian Gulf... A cataphract (from the Greek κατάφρακτος katafraktos, plural katafraktoi) was a form of heavy cavalry used by nomadic eastern Iranian tribes and dynasties and later Greeks and Latin-speaking peoples. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... BC may stand for: Before Christ (see Anno Domini) : an abbreviation used to refer to a year before the beginning of the year count that starts with the supposed year of the birth of Jesus. ...

Norman cavalry attacks the Anglo-Saxon shield wall at the battle of Hastings as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry. The lances are held with one-handed over-the-head grip
Norman cavalry attacks the Anglo-Saxon shield wall at the battle of Hastings as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry. The lances are held with one-handed over-the-head grip

The use of the basic cavalry spear is so ancient, and warfare so ubiquitous by the beginning of recorded history, that it is difficult to determine which populations invented the lance and which learned it from their enemies or allies. Image File history File links Normans_Bayeux. ... Image File history File links Normans_Bayeux. ... Norman conquests in red. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... The formation of Shield walls is a military tactic common to many cultures. ... Combatants Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Aquitanians, Flemings Anglo-Saxons Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, but significantly higher than the Normans The... The Bayeux Tapestry (French: Tapisserie de Bayeux) is a 50 cm by 70 m (20 in by 230 ft) long embroidered cloth which depicts the events leading up to, as well as, the Norman invasion of England in 1066. ...


The best known usage of military lances was that of the full-gallop closed-ranks and usually wedge-shaped charge of a group of knights with underarm-couched lances, against lines of infantry, archery regiments, defensive embankments, and opposition cavalry. It is commonly believed that this became the dominant European cavalry tactic in the 11th century after the development of the stirruped saddle (which prevented the charge from suddenly turning into a pole vault), and of rowel spurs (which enabled better control of the mount). Cavalry thus outfitted and deployed had a tremendous collective force in their charge, and could shatter most contemporary infantry lines. Recent evidence has suggested, however, that the lance charge could be (and was) effective without the benefit of stirrups. The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, bicycles, or other means. ... It has been suggested that Primitive Archery be merged into this article or section. ... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century, Kofun period, Japan. ... Pole vaulting is an athletic event where a person uses a long, flexible pole (usually made either of fiberglass or carbon fiber) as an aid to leap over a bar. ... Spurs, a plural of spur, may also refer to Spurs, the abbreviated name for Tottenham Hotspur, an association football team from North London, England. ...


While it could still be generally classified as a spear, the lance tends to be larger - usually both longer and stouter and thus also considerably heavier, and unsuited for throwing, or for the rapid thrusting, as with an infantry spear. Lances did not have spear tips that (intentionally) broke off or bent, unlike many throwing weapons of the spear/javelin family, and were adapted for mounted combat. They were often equipped with a vamplate, a small circular plate to prevent the hand sliding up the shaft upon impact. Though perhaps most known as one of the foremost military and sporting weapons used by European knights, the use of lances was spread throughout the Old World wherever mounts were available. As a secondary weapon, lancers of the period also bore swords, maces or something else suited to close quarter battle, since the lance was often a one-use-per-engagement weapon; after the initial charge, the weapon was far too long, heavy and slow to be effectively used against opponents in a melee. A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... The Old World consists of those parts of Earth known to Europeans, Asians, and Africans before the voyages of Christopher Columbus; it includes Europe, Asia, and Africa (collectively known as Africa-Eurasia), plus surrounding islands. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An advance on the club, a mace is a strong, heavy wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ... For other meanings of the term, see melée (disambiguation). ...

Vargas Swamp Lancers memorial in Colombia
Vargas Swamp Lancers memorial in Colombia

Because of the extreme stopping power of a thrusting spear, it quickly became a popular weapon of footmen in the Late Middle Ages. These eventually lead to the rise of the longest type of spears ever, the pike. Ironically, this adaptation of the cavalry lance to infantry use was largely tasked with stopping lance-armed cavalry charges. During the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, these weapons, both mounted and unmounted, were so effective that lancers and pike men not only became a staple of every Western army, but also became highly sought-after mercenaries. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) monumento de la batalla del pantano de vargas File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) monumento de la batalla del pantano de vargas File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to... Vargas Swamp Lancers or Monumento a los Lanceros is a large sculptural complex realized by colombian artist Rodrigo Arenas Betancur in the department of Boyacá (Colombia) as a memorial for Vargas Swamp Battle. ... Dante by Michelino The Late Middle Ages is a term used by historians to describe European history in the period of the 14th to 16th centuries (AD 1300–1500). ... A modern recreation of a mid-17th century company of pikemen. ... A Lancer was a cavalry soldier who fought with a lance. ... A pike is a pole weapon once used extensively by infantry principally as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. ...


In Europe, a jousting lance was a variation of the knight's lance which was modified from its original war design. In jousting, the lance tips would usually be blunt, often spread out like a cup or furniture foot, to provide a wider impact surface designed to unseat the opposing rider without spearing him through. The center of the shaft of such lances could be designed to be hollow, in order for it to break on impact, as a further safeguard against impalement. They were often 4 m long or longer, and had special hand guards built into the lance, often tapering for a considerable portion of the weapon's length. These are the versions that can most often be seen at medieval re-enactment festivals. In war, lances were much more like stout spears, long and balanced for one handed use, and with decidedly sharp tips. World map showing the location of Europe. ... Jousting scene, by Jörg Breu the Elder (1510s, pen and black ink over black chalk) Jousting is a competition between two knights on horse-back, wherein each knight tries to knock the other off his mount. ... Jousting is a staple entertainment at Renaissance Fairs. ... Categories: Stub | Death penalty | Torture ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Reenactors of the American Civil War Historical reenactment is an activity in which participants recreate some aspects of a historical event or period. ...


The mounted lance saw a renaissance in the 18th century with the demise of the pike; heavily armoured cuirassiers used 2-3 m lances as their main weapons. They were usually used for the breakneck charge against the enemy infantry. French cuirassier armour, 1854 Cuirassiers were mounted cavalry soldiers equipped with armour and firearms, first appearing in late 15th-century Europe. ...


The Crimean War saw the most infamous though ultimately unsuccessful use of the lance, the Charge of the Light Brigade. Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


After the Western introduction of the horse to Native Americans, the Plains Indians also took up the lance, probably independently, as American cavalry of the time were sabre- and pistol-armed, firing forward at full gallop. The natural adaptation of the throwing spear to a stouter thrusting and charging spear appears to be an inevitable evolutionary trend in the military use of the horse, and a rapid one at that. The term Western world, the West or the Occident (Latin occidens -sunset, -west, as distinct from the Orient) [1] can have multiple meanings dependent on its context (e. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Original range of the Plains Indians The Plains Indians are the Indians who lived on the plains and rolling hills of the Great Plains of North America. ... It has been suggested that Cavalry saber be merged into this article or section. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ...

Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznań in uniforms of 15th Uhlan's Regiment of Poznań from 1939
Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznań in uniforms of 15th Uhlan's Regiment of Poznań from 1939

American cavalry and Canadian North Western Mounted Police used a fine lance as a flagstaff. In 1886, the first official musical ride was performed in Regina, this fine ceremonial lance plays a significant role in the choreography. The worlds oldest continuous Mounted Police unit in the world, being the New South Wales Mounted Police, housed at Redfern Barracks, Sydney Australia carries a lance with a navy blue and white pennant in all ceremonial occasions. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x968, 425 KB) Uniforms of 15th PoznaÅ„ Reg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x968, 425 KB) Uniforms of 15th PoznaÅ„ Reg. ... Polish uhlans from Duchy of Warsaw army Uhlans (in Polish: UÅ‚an also spelled Ulan, German, from Turkish oÄŸlan [1]) were originally Polish light cavalry soldiers armed with lances, sabres, pistols, rifles; later they also served in the Prussian and Austrian armies. ... PoznaÅ„ ( ; full official name: The Capital City of PoznaÅ„, Polish: StoÅ‚eczne Miasto PoznaÅ„ (Latin: , German: , Yiddish: פּױזן Poyzn) is a city in west-central Poland with over 578,900 inhabitants (2002). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flagstaff can refer to: the flagpole on a ship from which the ships colours are shown Flagstaff, Arizona, USA Flagstaff railway station on Melbournes City Loop This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Nickname: The Queen City Motto: Floreat Regina (Let Regina Flourish) Location of Regina in the SE quadrant of Saskatchewan Coordinates: Country Canada Province Saskatchewan District Assiniboia Established 1882 Government  - City Mayor Pat Fiacco  - Governing body Regina City Council  - MPs Dave Batters Ralph Goodale Tom Lukiwski Andrew Scheer  - MLAs Joanne Crofford...


During the Boer War, British troops successfully used the lance against the Boers in the first few battles, but the Boers adopted the use of trench warfare, machine guns and high powered rifles. The combined effect was devastating, so that British cavalry were remodeled as high mobility infantry units ('dragoons') fighting on foot. It was not until the development of the tank in World War I that mounted attacks were once again possible, but its mechanical technology doomed both the horse cavalry and the lance. Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Trench warfare is a form of war in which both opposing armies have static lines of defence. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A light dragoon from the American Revolution A dragoon is a soldier trained to fight on foot, but transport himself on horseback. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


"Lance" is also the name given by some anthropologists to the light flexible javelins (technically, darts) thrown by atlatls (spear-throwing sticks), but these are usually called "atlatl javelins". Some were not much larger than arrows, and were typically feather-fletched like an arrow, and unlike the vast majority of spears and javelins (one exception would be several instances of the many types of ballista bolt, a mechanically-thrown spear). Lance (unit organization): The small unit that surrounded a knight when we went into battle during the 14th and 15th centuries. A lance might have consisted of one or two squires, the knight himself, one to three men-at-arms, and possibly an archer. Lances were often combined under the banner of a higher ranking nobleman to form companies of knights that would act as an ad-hoc unit. Darts are missile weapons, designed to fly such that a sharp, often weighted point will strike first. ... An atlatl (from Nahuatl ahtlatl ; in English pronounced [1] or [2]) or spear-thrower is a tool that uses leverage to achieve greater velocity in spear-throwing, and includes a bearing surface which allows the user to temporarily store energy during the throw. ... The atlatl is a weapon that uses leverage to achieve greater speed in spear-throwing, and includes a bearing surface which allows the user to temporarily store elastic energy during the throw. ... An arrow is a pointed projectile that is shot with a bow. ... Fletching is the ancient art of creating arrows from materials such as wood and feathers. ... The ballista (Latin, from Greek ballistēs, from ballein to throw, plural ballistae) was a powerful ancient crossbow, although employing several loops of twisted skeins to power it, it used torsion (instead of a prod). ...

Contents

List of lances

Spears that are often considered lances include:

For all others, please see spear, pike or pole weapon A type of lance from the middle ages, it is a long stick like weapon. ... A pike is a pole weapon once used extensively by infantry principally as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. ... This article or section is missing needed references or citation of sources. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Falarica was an ancient Iberian ranged pole weapon which were sometime used as an incendiary weapon. ... Hasta is a Latin word meaning spear. ... Jousting scene, by Jörg Breu the Elder (1510s, pen and black ink over black chalk) Jousting is a competition between two knights on horse-back, wherein each knight tries to knock the other off his mount. ... The kontos was the Greek name for a type of lance used by Sarmatian cavalry. ... Kopia (lance) - the basic military formation in medieval Poland, identical to the lance-unit employed elsewhere in Western Europe. ... The Sangu, at times called Rori (People of the Steppes), are an ethnic and linguistic group based in southwestern Tanzania. ... The sarissa (or sarisa) was a 3 to 7 meter (13-21 feet) long double pointed pike used in the Macedonian phalanx. ... A Spontoon is type of European lance that came into being after the pike-man craze, coming into play in the middle of the 17th century. ... Sudes used as a simple picket fence. ... Teshub was the Hurrian god of sky and storm. ... Xyston (Greek spear, javelin) was a type of a long thrusting lance in ancient Greece. ... several yari, including one hafted with a simple crossbar straight yari head with saya Jumonji yari head use of yari in mock combat Yari (槍) is the Japanese term for spear, or more specifically, the straight-headed spear. ... Hunting spear and knife, from Mesa Verde National Park. ... A modern recreation of a mid-17th century company of pikemen. ... A reenactor troupe armed with a variety of polearm known as a Halberd. ...


References

  • Delbrück, Hans. History of the Art of War, originally published in 1920; University of Nebraska Press (reprint), 1990 (trans. J. Renfroe Walter). Volume III: Medieval Warfare.

Hans Delbrück. ...

See also

An army unit consisting of mounted soldiers are commonly known as cavalry. ... The Lances fournies was a late medieval army squad, consisting of one man-at-arms, one (usually mounted) swordsman, two archers, a valet and one or more pages. ... A Lancer was a cavalry soldier who fought with a lance. ... Jousting is a staple entertainment at Renaissance Fairs. ... Tent pegging (sometimes spelled tentpegging or tent-pegging) is a cavalry sport of ancient origin, and one of only ten equestrian disciplines officially recognised by the International Equestrian Federation. ...

External links

Look up Lance in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • From Lance to Pistol: The Evolution of Mounted Soldiers from 1550 to 1600 (myArmoury.com article)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1183 words)
The medical lance, a small poking instrument usually used to create small prick in the skin for a blood sample, or to make a hole for draining fluid from a pustule or other blemish, is a metaphoric reference to the cavalry weapon, as is the slang usage "lance", in reference to the penis.
The best known usage of military lances was that of the full-gallop closed-ranks and usually wedge-shaped charge of a group of knights with underarm-couched lances, against lines of infantry, archery regiments, defensive embankments, and opposition cavalry.
The mounted lance saw a renaissance in the 18th century with the demise of the pike; heavily armoured cuirassiers used 2-3 m lances as their main weapons.
Lance Armstrong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4025 words)
Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971 in Plano, Texas) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist.
He is most famous for winning the Tour de France a record seven consecutive times from 1999 to 2005, several years after brain and testicular surgery and extensive chemotherapy in 1996 to treat testicular cancer that had metastasized to his brain and lungs.
Lance Armstrong began dating singer Sheryl Crow sometime in the autumn of 2003, and publicly revealed their relationship in January 2004.
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