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Encyclopedia > Lamar Alexander
Lamar Alexander
Lamar Alexander

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 7, 2003
Serving with Bob Corker
Preceded by Fred Thompson
Succeeded by Incumbent (2009)

In office
January 17, 1979 – January 17, 1987
Lieutenant(s) John S. Wilder
Preceded by Ray Blanton
Succeeded by Ned McWherter

In office
March 22, 1991 – January 20, 1993
President George H.W. Bush
Preceded by Lauro Cavazos
Succeeded by Richard Riley

Born July 3, 1940 (1940-07-03) (age 67)
Maryville, Tennessee
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse Honey Buhler
Residence Nashville, Tennessee
Alma mater Vanderbilt University (1962)
Profession Attorney
Religion Presbyterian

Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. He was previously the 45th Governor of Tennessee from 1979 to 1987, U.S. Secretary of Education from 1991 to 1993 under President George H.W. Bush and candidate for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1996 and 2000. He received a B.A. Degree from Vanderbilt University in 1962 and a J.D. from New York University Law School in 1965. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x3000, 511 KB) http://alexander. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... For the silent movie actor, see Fred Thomson. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee is the Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate and first in line in the succession to the office of Governor of Tennessee in the event of the death, resignation, or removal from office through impeachment and conviction of the Governor. ... John Shelton Wilder (born 1921) has served as Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee since 1971. ... Ray Blanton Leonard Ray Blanton (April 10, 1930–November 22, 1996) was the 44th governor of Tennessee from 1975 to 1979. ... Ned McWherter Ned Ray McWherter (born October 15, 1930) is an American politician who served as the 46th Governor of Tennessee from 1987 to 1995. ... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Lauro Fred Cavazos (born January 4, 1927) is a U.S. educator. ... Richard Wilson Riley (born January 2, 1933), American politician, was the United States Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton as well as the Governor of South Carolina, is a member of the Democratic Party. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ...

Contents

Early and Personal Life

Alexander was born in Maryville, Tennessee (outside of Knoxville), where he was raised, to Genevra Floreine Rankin and Andrew Lamar Alexander.[1] In high school he was elected Governor of Tennessee Boys State. Alexander graduated with a B.A. from Vanderbilt University where he was a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity in 1962 and from the New York University School of Law in 1965. After graduating from law school, Alexander clerked for United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit judge John Minor Wisdom in New Orleans from 1965 to 1966.[2] Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States District Courts: Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Louisiana Northern and Southern Districts of Mississippi Western, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of Texas The court is based at... John Minor Wisdom (May 17, 1905 - May 15, 1999), one of the Fifth Circuit Four, and a liberal Republican from Louisiana, was a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit during the 1950s and 1960s, when that court became known for a series of decisions...


Alexander married Leslee "Honey" Buhler in 1969. They had met during a softball game for Senate staff members; he was then a staffer for Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee while she worked for Senator John Tower of Texas. Together they have four children: Drew, Leslee, Kathryn, and Will. Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... John Tower John Goodwin Tower (September 29, 1925 – April 5, 1991) was the first Republican United States senator from Texas since the Reconstruction after the Civil War. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


He is also a classical and country pianist. Alexander got to put these talents on display in April 2007 when he played piano on singer Patti Page's re-recording of her 1950 hit "Tennessee Waltz." He appeared on the record, due out for release in the summer of 2007, at the invitation of record executive Mike Curb. Alexander and Page then performed the song live at an April 4 fundraiser for his Senatorial re-election campaign in Nashville's Schermerhorn Symphony Center.[3]. Classical music is music considered classical, as sophisticated and refined, in a regional tradition. ... Country music, once known as Country and Western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... April 2007 is the fourth month of the year. ... Patti Page (born Clara Ann Fowler on November 8, 1927 in Claremore, Oklahoma) is one of the best-known female singers in traditional pop music. ... The Tennessee Waltz is a song, belonging to both the country music and popular genres, written by Redd Stewart and Pee Wee King in 1947, popularized by Patti Page and by Les Paul and Mary Ford in 1950. ... Michael Curb (born December 24, 1944 in Savannah, Georgia) is an American musician, record company executive, race car owner (in both NASCAR and IRL), and politician who served as Lieutenant Governor of California from 1979 until 1983. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ...


Political career

In 1967, he worked as a legislative assistant for Senator Howard Baker. While a staffer, he was briefly roommates with future U.S. Senator Trent Lott. In 1969, he worked for Bryce Harlow, President Nixon's executive assistant.[2] Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... Chester Trent Lott, Sr. ... Bryce Harlow was born in 1916 in Oklahoma. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


In 1970 he moved back to Tennessee, serving as campaign manager for Memphis dentist Winfield Dunn's successful gubernatorial bid. Bryant Winfield Culberson Dunn (born July 1, 1927) was governor of Tennessee from 1971 to 1975. ...


Thanks to his successful tenure as Dunn's campaign manager, Alexander received the Republican nomination for governor of Tennessee in 1974. He faced Democrat Ray Blanton, a former congressman and unsuccessful 1972 Senate candidate. Blanton attacked Alexander for his service under Nixon, who had resigned in disgrace several months earlier. He also portrayed Alexander as being too distant from average Tennesseeans, even though Alexander was the son of teachers. Blanton would win the election 56%-44%. Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Ray Blanton Leonard Ray Blanton (April 10, 1930–November 22, 1996) was the 44th governor of Tennessee from 1975 to 1979. ...


In 1977, he once again worked in Senator Baker's Washington office following Baker's election as Senate Minority Leader. Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ...


Governor of Tennessee

Even though the Tennessee State Constitution had been amended in early 1978 to allow a governor to succeed himself, Blanton chose not to seek re-election, due to a number of scandals. Alexander once again ran for governor, and made a name for himself by walking 1,000 miles across the state wearing a red and black plaid shirt. He defeated Knoxville banker Jake Butcher in the November election. The Tennessee State Constitution defines the form, structure, activities, character, and fundamental rules (and means for changing them) of the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... Jacob Franklin Butcher (sometimes called Jake) (1936 - ) was an American banker. ...


In early 1979, a furor ensued over pardons made by Blanton that appeared to be made out of pure politics; some of them smacked of bribery. Since the state constitution is somewhat vague on when a governor must be sworn in, several political leaders from both parties, including Lieutenant Governor John S. Wilder and State House Speaker Ned McWherter, arranged for Alexander to be sworn in several days earlier than the traditional inauguration day. Wilder later called the move "impeachment Tennessee-style." Soon after being sworn in, Alexander ordered the state Highway Patrol to seize control of the state capitol to prevent any maneuvers by Blanton to regain office. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bribery is a crime implying a sum or gift given alters the behaviour of the person in ways not consistent with the duties of that person. ... The Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee is the Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate and first in line in the succession to the office of Governor of Tennessee in the event of the death, resignation, or removal from office through impeachment and conviction of the Governor. ... John Shelton Wilder (born 1921) has served as Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee since 1971. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... Ned McWherter Ned Ray McWherter (born October 15, 1930) is an American politician who served as the 46th Governor of Tennessee from 1987 to 1995. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ...


Alexander made history by becoming the first person reelected to a second 4-year term by defeating Knoxville mayor Randy Tyree in the 1982 election, carrying almost 70% of Knox County. During his second term, he served as chairman of the National Governors Association from 1985 to 1986. After opting out of the 1984 U.S. Senate contest for the open seat of retiring Majority Leader Howard Baker, Alexander was constitutionally ineligible for a 3rd term and stepped down from the governorship in January 1987. Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


After governorship

Moving with his family to Australia for a time, he would soon return to Tennessee and became the president of the University of Tennessee (1988–1991), and United States Secretary of Education (1991–1993). The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ...


In 1987, he helped found Corporate Child Care Management, Inc. (now known as Bright Horizons Family Solutions Inc.), a company that -- via a merger -- is now the nation's largest provider of worksite day care. In his 2005 U.S. Sentate financial disclosure report, he listed personal ownership of BFAM (Bright Horizons Family Solutions) stock valued (at that time) between $1 million and $5 million dollars. Bright Horizons Family Solutions is a US-based child-care provider and one of the largest publicly held child-care corporations in the world. ...


He taught about the American character as a faculty member at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is a public policy school and one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


He also made two unsuccessful runs for President of the United States, in the 1996 and 2000 election cycles. In 1996, he finished third in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire Primary and dropped out before the Super Tuesday primaries. After dropping out of the race, Alexander took an advisory role in the Dole/Kemp campaign.[4] His second candidacy, in which he traveled around the U.S. in a Ford Explorer, eschewing a campaign bus or plane, lasted less than six months, being announced March 9, 1999, and withdrawn August 16, 1999 (after a poor showing in the Ames Straw Poll), both times in Nashville.[5] An article in The New York Times during this period comments that Alexander's "bitter belief that party's nominating process is being short-circuited by big money and big media has become [his] consuming preoccupation," referring to the Republican Party.[6] For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes. ... In the United States presidential election of 2000 Republican George W. Bush gained the US Presidency over Democrat Al Gore on December 12, 2000 in the United States Supreme Court case Bush v. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... In the United States, Super Tuesday commonly refers to a Tuesday in early March of a presidential election year. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... The Ford Explorer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Ames Straw Poll is a straw poll that takes place in Ames, Iowa on a Saturday in August of years in which the Republican presidential nomination is undecided (that is, in years without an incumbent Republican President). ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


Senate career

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Despite vowing to never again return to elective office, he was nevertheless persuaded by the White House to run for the open seat of retiring Senator Fred Thompson in 2002. Seen as a moderate Republican by Tennessee standards, his candidacy was vigorously opposed by conservatives who supported Congressman Ed Bryant, who had become one of the House managers during the 1998 impeachment of President Bill Clinton. Alexander was better-funded and armed with more prominent endorsements, winning by a closer-than-expected margin over Bryant in the primary. Democrats had high hopes of recovering the seat with their candidate, Nashville Congressman Bob Clement, a member of a prominent political family. Despite grumblings by conservatives to defect to the moderately liberal Clement, Alexander was successful in defeating Clement in the general election that year. With his election to the U.S. Senate, he became the first Tennessean to be popularly elected both governor and senator. At 62, Alexander also became the oldest elected freshman U.S. Senator from Tennessee since Democrat Lawrence D. Tyson in 1924. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... For the silent movie actor, see Fred Thomson. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Ed Bryant (born September 7, 1948), American politician, is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Tennessee (1995 - 2003). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... Bob Clement has not looked like this since 1974 Robert Nelson Bob Clement (born September 23, 1943 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Tennessee politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Lawrence D. Tyson (July 4, 1861 – August 24, 1929) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1925 until his death. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Senator Alexander currently sits on the Appropriations Committee, the Environment and Public Works Committee, the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, and the Senate Rules Committee. He is the ranking minority member on the Subcommittee on Children and Families and the Subcommittee on Public Sector Solutions to Global Warming, Oversight, and Children’s Health Protection. He also co-chairs the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Caucus. The U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ... The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ... The United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration is responsible for dealing with the rules of the United States Senate, with administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. ... The Senate Health Subcommittee on Children and Families is one of the three subcommittees within the Senate Committee on Health The Subcommittees jurisdiction includes Head Start, the Family Medical Leave Act, child care and child support, and other issues involving children, youth, and families. ... The U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Public Sector Solutions to Global Warming, Oversight, Childrens Health Protection is one of the six subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Though he announced that he had secured the requisite number of votes to become the Republican Party's Minority Whip in the Senate during the 110th Congress, he lost the election to former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott by one vote. The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Chester Trent Lott, Sr. ...


Senate re-election bid

Senator Alexander announced his intention to seek re-election to the Senate in 2008. He made this announcement in his hometown of Maryville on April 3, 2007.[7] The Tennessee United States Senate election of 2008 will be held on November 4, 2008. ... Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


In 2007 there have been rumors that former Congressman Harold Ford Jr., who unsuccessfully ran against Bob Corker for the Tennessee Senate seat vacated by former majority leader Bill Frist, will run against Alexander in 2008. Harold Ford Jr. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversy and criticism

TRACS criticism

The Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools (TRACS) in 1987 was denied recognition for the group to accredit schools. An advisory panel repeatedly recommended against recognizing TRACS as an accreditor, but in 1991 Education Secretary Lamar Alexander approved TRACS.[8] In 1993, Steve Levicoff published a book-length critical discussion of TRACS and Alexander's decision in When the TRACS Stop Short: An Evaluation and Critique of the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools, through the Institute on Religion and Law.[9] TRACS The Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools, or TRACS, is a national accreditation agency located in Forest, Virginia. ... Accreditation is a process by which a facilitys services and operations are examined by a third-party accrediting agency to determine if applicable standards are met. ... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... Dr. Steve Levicoff is a distance learning expert and is a leading critic of diploma mills. ...


Electoral history

Tennessee U.S. Senate Election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Alexander 888,223 54.3
Democratic Bob Clement 726,510 44.2
Tennessee Gubernatorial Election, 1982
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Alexander (Incumbent) 737,693 59.56 +3.72
Democratic Randy Tyree 500,937 40.44
Tennessee Gubernatorial Election, 1978
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Alexander 661,959 55.84
Democratic Jake Butcher 523,495 44.16
Tennessee Gubernatorial Election, 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Ray Blanton 576,833 55.88
Republican Lamar Alexander 455,467 44.12

This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Bob Clement has not looked like this since 1974 Robert Nelson Bob Clement (born September 23, 1943 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Tennessee politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Jacob Franklin Butcher (sometimes called Jake) (1936 - ) was an American banker. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Ray Blanton Leonard Ray Blanton (April 10, 1930–November 22, 1996) was the 44th governor of Tennessee from 1975 to 1979. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/alexander.htm
  2. ^ a b Lamar Alexander (1991 - 1993): Secretary of Education, Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia.
  3. ^ "Songbird, senator team up on "Waltz"", The Tennessean, 2007-04-03. Retrieved on 2007-04-09. 
  4. ^ "Reading, Writing, and Reform" (transcript of a news-program debate among Bob Dole, Lamar Alexander, and Albert Shanker), 22 Aug 1996 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/education/teachers_unions_8-22.html
  5. ^ "Lamar Alexander" http://www.christcenteredmall.com/news/politics/Republican-Race/alexander-profile.htm
  6. ^ "Alexander, After 6-Year Run, Is Short on Time and Money," Melinda Henneberger, 12 Aug 1999
  7. ^ "Alexander Running Again, Sets Fundraiser", The Chattanoogan, 2007-04-03. Retrieved on 2007-04-06. 
  8. ^ Sandefur, Timothy. "Dinosaur TRACS: The Approaching Conflict between Establishment Clause Jurisprudence And College Accreditation Procedures", Nexus (law journal) from Chapman University School of Law, March 24, 2002. Retrieved on 2006-11-04. 
  9. ^ Jaschik, Scott. "Christian Accrediting Group Faulted in Federal Review", The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 16, 1995. Retrieved on 2007-05-04. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chapman University School of Law, referred to sometimes as Chapman Law, is a private, non-profit law school located in Orange, California. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Preceded by
Ray Blanton
Governor of Tennessee
1979–1987
Succeeded by
Ned McWherter
Preceded by
Edward Boling
President of the University of Tennessee
1988–1991
Succeeded by
Joseph E. Johnson
Preceded by
Lauro Cavazos
United States Secretary of Education
Served Under: George H.W. Bush

19911993
Succeeded by
Richard Riley
Preceded by
Fred Thompson
United States Senator (Class 2) from Tennessee
2003 – present
Served alongside: Bill Frist, Bob Corker
Incumbent
Current Committee Assignments
Committee Position
Appropriations
Environment and Public Works Subcommittee Ranking Member
Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Subcommittee Ranking Member
Rules and Administration
Persondata
NAME Alexander, Lamar
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Alexander, Andrew Lamar
SHORT DESCRIPTION senior United States Senator from Tennessee
DATE OF BIRTH July 3, 1940
PLACE OF BIRTH Maryville, Tennessee
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
TN Encyclopedia: LAMAR ALEXANDER (895 words)
Lamar Alexander, governor, university president, and U.S. secretary of education, was born on July 3, 1940, in Blount County.
Alexander began his law career as a clerk to Judge John M. Wisdom of the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court in 1965; within two years his political career was underway, as he became a legislative assistant to Republican U.S. Senator Howard Baker in 1967.
At the request of the U.S. attorney, Alexander was sworn in as governor three days early, on January 17, 1979, in reaction to the possibility that Governor Ray Blanton would grant clemency to prisoners who, according to state and federal officials, had paid bribes for the expressed purpose of gaining executive pardons.
Lamar Alexander positioned as the moderate alternative (882 words)
Finally, as president, Alexander would use his office as a bully pulpit to address major societal problems, most notably the importance of community involvement and the decline of the family, church, neighborhood and school--institutions he says give Ameri-cans "an almost irrational belief in our own future" that is the key to success.
Alexander himself doesn't have a problem with activist state governments; he was in many respects an activist governor in Tennessee, raising taxes to fund educational reforms and highway building.
Lamar Alexander's platform is much more consistent ideologically than those of most presidential candidates, but that is not enough to ensure success.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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