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Encyclopedia > Lake George (New York)
Lake George
View from Sabbath Day Point
Location Adirondack Mountains
Coordinates 43°34′N, 73°37′W
Primary outflows La Chute River
Basin countries USA
Max length 32 miles (54 km)
Max width 1-3 miles (1.6-5 km)
Surface area 28,160 acres (113 km²)
Max depth 200 feet (61 m)
Surface elevation 319 feet (97 m)
Islands ~170
Settlements Lake George, NY; Ticonderoga, NY; Bolton Landing, NY

Lake George, nicknamed the Queen of American Lakes[citation needed], is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York, USA. The lake extends about 32.2 miles (54 km) on a north-south axis and varies from 1 to 3 miles (1.7 to 5 km) in width. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1749x1158, 350 KB) Summary New Yorks Lake George. ... The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A photo of Lake George Lake George is a village located in Warren County, New York, USA. It is part of the Glens Falls, New York Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Ticonderoga is a town located in Essex County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 5,167. ... Bolton is a town located in Warren County, New York. ... Blowdown Lake in the mountains near Pemberton, British Columbia A lake (from Latin lacus) is a body of water or other liquid of considerable size contained on a body of land. ... The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... NY redirects here. ...


Lake George drains into Lake Champlain to its north through a short stream (La Chute River) with many falls and rapids, dropping about 230 feet (70 meters) in its 3½-mile (6 km) course. Ultimately the water flows into the St. Lawrence River and then into the Atlantic Ocean. The original name in Iroquois was said to be Andiatarocte, the lake shut in[citation needed] and was named by the French Lac du Saint-Sacrement, (Lake of the Holy Sacrament). Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Languages Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Tuscarora, English, French Religions Christianity, Longhouse religion The Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the League of Peace and Power; the Five Nations; the Six Nations; or the People of the Long house) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans that originally consisted of...


The Village of Lake George is located at the south end of Lake George and the unincorporated village of Ticonderoga is at the northern end. The area is a well-known resort center and summer colony. A photo of Lake George Lake George is a village located in Warren County, New York, USA. It is part of the Glens Falls, New York Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Ticonderoga is a hamlet located in Essex County, New York, USA. Ticonderoga has a populaton of about 5,200. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ...


There are several towns and villages on the shore of the lake. Lake George village is the farthest south and the busiest. Generally, tourists prefer this area. However, frequenters and residents often scorn this area as a tourist attraction[citation needed], as it is the largest of the Lake's towns. To the north is Bolton Landing, substantially quieter and more affluent. Bolton houses the largest of the Lake's resorts, the Sagamore Hotel. The center of Bolton lies on Bolton Bay, as does Green Island (Sagamore Island). At the north end of the lake are Silver Bay, Hague and Huletts Landing. Bolton Landing, New York is a small lakeside community in the Adirondacks. ... The Sagamore is a grand Victorian era hotel located on the heart of Lake George in Bolton Landing, New York. ... Hague is a town located in Warren County, New York. ... Huletts Landing (Huletts Landing) is a small lakeside community on the eastern shore of Lake George in the Adirondack Mountains of northern New York, USA. Huletts Landing is a Hamlet of the Town of Dresden in northern Washington County. ...

Contents

History

The first European visitor to the area, Samuel de Champlain, noted the lake in his journal on July 3, 1609, but did not name it. In 1646, the missionary Isaac Jogues named it Lac du Saint-Sacrement, and the exit stream as the river La Chute (the fall). A much-reproduced fictional portrait of Champlain by Théophile Hamel (1870) (no authentic portrait has survived)[1]) Samuel de Champlain , the father of New France, was born around 1580 in the town of Brouage, a seaport on Frances west coast. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Isaac Jogues (January 10, 1607 – October 18, 1646) was a Jesuit missionary who travelled and worked among the Native Americans in North America. ...


On August 28, 1755, Sir William Johnson led British colonial forces to occupy the area in the French and Indian War. He renamed the lake as Lake George for King George II and built a protecting fortification at its southern end. The fort was named Fort William Henry for the King's grandson Prince William Henry, a younger brother of the later King George III. On September 8, 1755 the Battle of Lake George was fought between the forces of Britain and France. is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Sir William Johnson Sir William Johnson (1715-1774) was an Irish pioneer and army officer in colonial New York, and the British Superintendent of Indian Affairs from 1755 to 1774. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: * Algonquin * Lenape * Wyandot * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy American Colonies Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) The French and Indian War was the nine-year North American chapter of the Seven Years... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... The British Fort William Henry on the shores of Lake George, New York (NY), was built during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) by Sir William Johnson as a staging ground for attacks against the French Fort Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). ... HRH Prince William Henry, Earl of Connaught, 1st Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (November 14, 1743 - August 25, 1805) was a British prince and military officer, younger brother of King George III. He was born to Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha at Leicester House in... George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders William Johnson, 1st Baronet Johnson, King Hendrick † Jean Erdman, Baron Dieskau Strength 1,500 militia, 200 Mohawks 3,500 regulars, militia, and natives Casualties 331 killed, wounded or missing [1] 339 killed, wounded or missing [2] Seven Years War in North America: The French and Indian...


In September, the French responded by beginning construction of Fort Carillon, later called Fort Ticonderoga, on a point where La Chute enters Lake Champlain. These fortifications controlled the easy water route between Canada and Colonial New York. Fort Ticonderoga as seen from Lake Champlain Fort Ticonderoga is a large 18th century fort built at a strategically important narrows in Lake Champlain where a short traverse gives access to the north end of Lake George in the state of New York, USA.The fort controlled both commonly used... NY redirects here. ...


On May 31, 1791, Thomas Jefferson wrote, in a letter to his daughter, "Lake George is without comparison, the most beautiful water I ever saw; formed by a contour of mountains into a basin... finely interspersed with islands, its water limpid as crystal, and the mountain sides covered with rich groves... down to the water-edge: here and there precipices of rock to checker the scene and save it from monotony."


In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Lake George was a common spot sought out by well known artists including E. Charlton Fortune and Frank Vincent DuMond. E. Charlton Fortune (1885-1969} was a famous California artist who flourished on the Monterey Peninsula of California within the style of Impressionism. ... Frank Vincent DuMond (1865-1951) was an American impressionist painter born in Rochester, New York whose students include Norman Rockwell and Georgia OKeefe. ...


Tourist Destination

At one time, Lake George was one of the nation's first elite tourist destinations. Conveniently situated on the rail line half way between New York City and Montreal, the lake became a magnet for the era's rich and famous by the late 19th and early 20th century.


Tourists from all over North America and Europe flocked to Lake George and the surrounding majestic Adirondack Mountains. By the turn of the 19th century Lake George was equaled only by Newport, Saratoga and the Hamptons as a summer enclave for America's aristocracy. Members of the Roosevelt, van Rensselaer, Vanderbilt, Rockefeller, and Whitney families visited its shores. The Fort William Henry Hotel, in what is now Lake George Village and The Sagamore in Bolton Landing were popular spots for those who could afford a "vacation", something that was only then becoming available to a privileged few. But the wealthiest of the period were more likely to stay with their peers at their private country estates.


Millionaire's Row

Millionaire's Row was the haunt of Lake George's richest summer residents. A stretch of Bolton Road (now Lake Shore Drive) on the west side of the lake was where the aristocrats built their large and elegant mansions. Millionaire's Row was inhabited in the summer months by such notables as Spencer Trask, the famous New York architect and socialite, and Robert Pitcairn, friend of Andrew Carnegie (and one of the world's richest men). The palatial homes of Millionaire's Row typically had dozens of bedrooms and were sometimes in excess of 20,000 square feet. Ironically, they were coyly called "cottages" by their owners in a vain attempt at being unpretentious. These grand houses, with every modern comfort and convenience, were in marked contrast to the more rustic summer "camps" built by other wealthy Adirondack summer residents such as William Durant and John D. Rockefeller. Instead of log and timber construction such as Durant's famous Uncus Lodge near Raquette Lake, the houses of Millionaire's Row were huge stone and masonry structures in the Tudor, Georgian, and Italianate styles. In the 1920s, Pitcairn's estate, which is now a condominium and marina, even had a landing pad for an "auto gyro", predecessor of the modern helicopter. Unlike their contemporaries in Newport and The Hamptons which were built on tiny pieces of land, the cottages of Millionaire's row were mansions in the true sense of the word. They were often built on hundreds of acres of pristine lakeside wilderness.


As was the case with other turn of the century displays of wealth and power, the mansions of Millionaire's Row became unaffordable to its owners by the 1930s. The changing economic climate and income tax and took their toll on the largess of the nation's elite. By the 1950s, with the advent of affordable auto and air travel Lake George became more attractive to the growing middle class and less so to the "jet set". Most of the mansions of Millionaire's Row were torn down or turned into hotels and restaurants. Yet still, Lake George maintains some of the remnants of its slendid past. The gemlike Sagamore still sits on its shore. Melody Manor, Sun Castle, and Green Harbor Mansion are three Millionaire's Row "cottages" that escaped demolition. They are just a few of the beautiful and historic places that can still be enjoyed today by summer visitors.


The Lake George Stakes, a Grade III race on turf for three-year-old Thoroughbred fillies is run at the Saratoga Race Course each year. The race is named for this lake. The Lake George Stakes is a race for thoroughbred race horses open to three-year-old fillies and run at a distance of one and one-sixteenth miles on the turf at Saratoga Race Course. ... A graded stakes race is a term applied to a Thoroughbred horse race in the United States and Canada to describe races that derive their name from the stake, or entry fee, owners must pay. ... Thoroughbred race horses The Thoroughbred is a horse breed best known as a race horse. ... Filly is also a town in Belgium. ... Saratoga Race Course is a famous horse-racing track in Saratoga Springs, New York. ...


Ethan Allen accident

On October 2, 2005, at 2:55 p.m., the Ethan Allen, a 40-foot glass-enclosed tourist boat carrying 47 passengers and operated by Shoreline Cruises, capsized on the lake. According to reports from a local newspaper, 20 people (mostly senior citizens) died when the boat capsized during calm weather, possibly due to the wake from passing boats. On October 2, 2005, the tourboat Ethan Allen capsized on Lake George, in Upstate New York, at 2:55 PM. Ethan Allen is raised by investigators after capsizing and sinking 70 ft underwater. ... October 2 is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... On October 2, 2005, the tourboat Ethan Allen capsized on Lake George, in Upstate New York, at 2:55 PM. Ethan Allen is raised by investigators after capsizing and sinking 70 ft underwater. ...


Initial reports indicated that the tour group was from Canada, but these reports were later found to be incorrect. It was later determined that the group was from the Trenton, Michigan, area on a weeklong fall trip along the East Coast by bus and rail, organized by Trenton's parks and recreation department and arranged through a Canadian company. Police said they have never seen a disaster of this magnitude on the lake. The captain survived and cooperated with police. [2] [3] Coordinates: Settled 1816 Incorporation 1855 Area  - City 18. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ...


The National Transportation Safety Board investigation of the incident revealed that, although the boat was rated to carry 50 people when it was manufactured in 1966, subsequent alterations to the boat's design had greatly reduced its stability. At the time of the accident, the boat should have been rated to carry no more than 14 passengers. On February 5th, 2007, the captain, Richard Paris, and the company that owned the boat, Shoreline Cruises, were indicted for only having one crew member aboard the boat. More serious charges were not filed because neither the captain nor the owners were aware they were violating safety standards.[1] Seal of the National Transportation Safety Board The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is a U.S. government independent organization responsible for investigation of accidents involving aviation, highway, marine, pipelines and railroads in the United States. ...


Image gallery

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ...

References

  1. ^ "Captain Indicted in Fatal Boat Accident", by the Associated Press. February 5, 2007 [1]

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lake George (New York) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (528 words)
Lake George, also known as the Queen of American Lakes, is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York, USA.
The Village of Lake George is located at the south end of Lake George and the unincorporated village of Ticonderoga is at the northern end.
On September 8, 1755 the Battle of Lake George was fought between the forces of Britan and France.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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