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Lafayette McLaws

Lafayette McLaws ( January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 350 days remaining (351 in leap years). Events 69 - Otho seizes power in Rome, proclaiming himself Emperor of Rome, but only survives for three months before committing suicide. 1559 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned... January 15, Events February 23 - The Philadelphia College of Apothecaries founds the first pharmacy college. March 25 - Greece declares its independence from the Ottoman Empire, beginning the Greek War of Independence. July 10 - The United States takes possession of its newly-bought territory of Florida from Spain. July 28 - Peru declares independence... 1821 July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. Events 1500-1899 1567 - Mary Queen of Scots is deposed. 1701 - Detroit, Michigan founded. 1814 - War of 1812: General Phineas Riall advances toward Niagara to halt Jacob Browns... July 24, Events January 1 - Brooklyn, New York merges with New York City. January 4 - A British force is ambushed by Chief Ologbosheri, son-in-law of the Oba of Benin. This leads to a Punitive Expedition against Benin. February 2 - Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania state capitol, is destroyed by fire. February 18... 1897) was a The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. As of fiscal year 2002 (FY02), it consisted of 480,000 soldiers on active duty and 555,000 in reserve (350,000 in the Army National Guard (ARNG) and 205... U.S. Army officer and a For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9... Confederate General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. The title is used by land and sometimes air forces. In the navies of the world, the equivalent rank is Admiral. Its equivalent rank in the Royal Air Force... general in the The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession... American Civil War.


McLaws, who pronounced his first name "La-FAY-ette", was born in The seal of the City of Augusta Augusta is a city located in the state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population is 199,775. In 1996 the governments of the City of Augusta and Richmond County combined to form a single governing body known as Augusta-Richmond County. The... Augusta, Georgia. He graduated from the Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). The Chapel at West Point The United States Military Academy, also known as West Point and USMA, is a U.S. military academy and former Army fort. It is located in West Point, New York, on the west bank of the Hudson River about 50... U.S. Military Academy in Events February 21 - John J. Greenough patents the sewing machine. March 5 - Over 500 Mexican troops led by Rafael Vasquez invade Texas briefly occupy San Antonio and then head back to the Rio Grande. This is the first such invasion since the Texas Revolution. March 30 - Anesthesia is used for... 1842 and served as an Infantry in the First World War Infantry (or Infantrymen) are soldiers who fight primarily on foot, using personal weapons. They may arrive on scene in various ways, and are deployed either in formations or as skirmishers and guerillas. In the modern period, the term infantryman is reserved for the most... infantry officer in the The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. It is also called the US-Mexico War. In the US it is also known as the Mexican War; in Mexico it is also known as the North American Invasion of Mexico... Mexican War, in the west, and in the expedition to The Utah Territory was an organized territory of the United States that existed between 1850 and 1896. The territory was organized by Act of Congress on September 9, 1850, on the same day that the State of California was admitted to the Union. The creation of the territory was part... Utah Territory to suppress the The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). The name Mormon (also Mormonite) was first used in the 1830s for followers of Joseph Smith, Jr. who accepted The Book of Mormon as... Mormon uprising. While at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, he married Emily Allison Taylor, the niece of Zachary Taylor ( November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. Taylor was noted for his extensive military career, becoming the first president not previously elected to any other public office. He... Zachary Taylor.


At the start of the Civil War, resigning as a U.S. Army Captain is both a nautical term and a military rank. The word came to English via French from the Latin capitaneus (chief) which is itself derived from the Latin word for head (caput). The term has different meanings both at sea and in the military. Confusion between the three types... captain, McLaws was commissioned a For non-military meanings, see major (disambiguation). Insignia of a United States Air Force Major In the US Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and the British Army, a major is a commissioned officer superior to a captain and inferior to a lieutenant colonel. The equivalent rank in the US Navy... major in the Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February, 1861, to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when eleven southern states seceded from the United States. The army was formed around a core of 313 officers who left the... Confederate States Army. He was quickly promoted to A Colonel is also a non-military honorary title awarded by some U.S. Southern states. Colonel is a military rank, usually the highest below general grades, and just above Lieutenant Colonel. The word is pronounced similarly to kernel, perhaps from the Spanish form coronel. In the US military, a... colonel of the 10th Georgia Infantry A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. Depending on mission, country of origin, and makeup, a modern regiment is similar to a brigade in size in that both range from a few hundred soldiers up to 2,000-3,000, depending on... regiment; then quickly again to A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. The rank is equivalent to the US Navy rank Rear Admiral (lower half), formerly and still in many other... brigadier general in Brigade is a term from military science which refers to a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). A brigade is smaller than a division and roughly equal to or a little larger... brigade and A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around 10,000 soldiers. In most armies a division is composed of several regiments or brigades, and in turn several divisions make up a corps. History Pre-modern divisions The term division came into use as armies began... division command in the The Seven Days Campaign (June 25–July 1, 1862), or Seven Days Battle, of the American Civil War was a successful effort by the Confederate commander Robert E. Lee to turn back the Union general George McClellans Army of the Potomac in its attempt to capture Richmond, Virginia... Seven Days Battles; then, on May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). There are 222 days remaining. Events 1430 - Joan of Arc is captured by the Burgundians while leading an army to relieve Compiègne 1498 - Girolamo Savonarola is executed on the orders of... May 23, Events January-March January 10 - End of term for John Gately Downey, 7th Governor of California. He is succeeded by Amasa Leland Stanford. January 30 - The first American ironclad warship, the USS Monitor is launched. February 1 - Julia Ward Howes Battle Hymn of the Republic is published for the... 1862, to Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. It is derieved from the older rank of Sergeant Major General. A major general is a high-ranking officer subordinate to a full General. In the United States... major general. He joined James Longstreet James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost generals of the American Civil War, and later enjoyed a successful post-war career working for the government of his former enemies, as a diplomat and administrator. Early Life Longstreet was born in Edgefield... James Longstreet's This article is about a military unit. For alternate meanings see Corps (disambiguation). A corps (a word that immigrated from the French language, but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is a large military unit or formation. In many armies, it refers to a... corps in the The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. It was most often arrayed against the Union Army of the Potomac during the Civil War. The first commander of the Army of Northern Virginia... Army of Northern Virginia as 1st Division commander and stayed with Longstreet for most of the war.


During For the author of Inherit the Wind and other works, see Robert Edwin Lee. Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807–October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces... Robert E. Lee's invasion of State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  ... Maryland in Events January-March January 10 - End of term for John Gately Downey, 7th Governor of California. He is succeeded by Amasa Leland Stanford. January 30 - The first American ironclad warship, the USS Monitor is launched. February 1 - Julia Ward Howes Battle Hymn of the Republic is published for the... 1862, McLaws' division was split from the rest of the corps, operated in conjunction with For the 1960s country music artist, see Stonewall Jackson (musician); for the submarine, see USS Stonewall Jackson (SSBN-634). Thomas Jonathan Stonewall Jackson (January 21, 1824–May 10, 1863) was an American teacher and soldier. He became a famous Confederate general during the American Civil War, and was killed... Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, and captured Maryland Heights at Harpers Ferry is the name of several places in the United States of America: Harpers Ferry, Iowa Harpers Ferry, West Virginia There was also John Browns raid on the armory at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia as well as a Battle of Harpers Ferry in the American Civil War. This... Harpers Ferry. He marched his division to Sharpsburg is a town located in Washington County, Maryland. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 691. Geography Sharpsburg is located at 39°2728 North, 77°4458 West (39.457666, -77.749513)1. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has... Sharpsburg, Maryland and defended the West Woods in the Battle of Antietam Conflict American Civil War Date September 16–18, 1862 Place Near Sharpsburg, Maryland Result (Union strategic victory) The Battle of Antietam (known as the Battle of Sharpsburg in the South), fought on Wednesday, September 17, 1862 near Sharpsburg, Maryland, was the first major battle of the... Battle of Antietam. Lee was disappointed in McLaws' slow arrival on the battlefield. At the The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought on December 13, 1862 between General Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac commanded by Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, is today remembered as one of the most one-sided battles of the American Civil War. The battle... Battle of Fredericksburg, McLaws' was one of the divisions defending Marye's Heights and he satisfied Lee with his ferocious defensive performance.


At Battle of Chancellorsville Conflict American Civil War Date April 30 – May 6, 1863 Place Spotsylvania County Result Decisive Confederate victory The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War in 1863. Called Lees perfect battle, it pitted U.S. Major General Joseph Hookers... Chancellorsville, while the rest of Longstreet's corps was detached for duty near Norfolk, Virginia, viewed from Portsmouth, across the Elizabeth River Norfolk is a city in the U.S. state of Virginia in the United States of America. It is an independent city, and therefore part of no county. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 234... Norfolk, Virginia, McLaws fought directly under Lee's command. On May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). There are 242 days remaining. Events 1494 - Christopher Columbus discovers Jamaica. 1791 - The May Constitution of Poland (first modern constitution in Europe) is proclaimed by the Polish Diet. 1808 - Finnish War: Sweden loses... May 3, 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. Events January January 1 - Abraham Lincoln delivers the Emancipation Proclamation during the second year of the American Civil War. January 1 - The first claim under the Homestead Act is made for a farm in Nebraska January 8 - Ground is broken in Sacramento... 1863, Lee sent McLaws' division to stop the Union The VI Corps (Sixth Corps) was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. The corps was organized as the Sixth Provisional Corps on May 18, 1862, by uniting Major General William B. Franklins Division, which had just arrived on the Virginia Peninsula, with Maj. Gen... VI Corps under Major General John Sedgwick John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union Army general in the American Civil War. Sedgwick was born in the Berkshires town of Cornwall Hollow, Connecticut. After teaching for two years, he attended the U... John Sedgwick marching toward Lee's rear. He did accomplish this, but Lee was disappointed that McLaws had not attacked more aggressively and caused more harm to Sedgwick, instead of letting him escape across the For the river in New Zealand, see Rappahannock River, New Zealand The Rappahannock River is a river in eastern Virginia in the United States, approximately 184 mi (294 km). It traverses the entire northern part of the state, from the Blue Ridge Mountains in the west across the Piedmont to... Rappahannock River. When Lee reorganized his army to compensate for Jackson's mortal wounding at Chancellorsville, Longstreet recommended his subordinate for one of the two new corps commands, but both men were disappointed when Lee chose Richard Stoddert Ewell (February 8, 1817 - January 25, 1872) was a Confederate military officer during the American Civil War. Ewell was born in Georgetown, D.C.. He graduated from West Point in 1840, thirteenth in his class. He was commissioned in the First Dragoons, then became a First Lieutenant in... Richard S. Ewell and Ambrose Powell Hill (November 9, 1825 _ April 2, 1865), was a Confederate States of America general in the American Civil War. A. P. Hill, known to his soldiers as Little Powell, was born in Culpeper, Virginia, and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1847, being appointed to... A.P. Hill instead. McLaws requested a transfer, but it was denied.


During the Battle of Gettysburg Conflict American Civil War Date July 1–3, 1863 Place Adams County Result Union victory The Battle of Gettysburg ( July 1– 3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the largest battle ever conducted in... Battle of Gettysburg on July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. It is the middle day of a non-leap year, because there are 182 days before and 182 days after. It falls on the same day of the week... July 2, 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. Events January January 1 - Abraham Lincoln delivers the Emancipation Proclamation during the second year of the American Civil War. January 1 - The first claim under the Homestead Act is made for a farm in Nebraska January 8 - Ground is broken in Sacramento... 1863, McLaws commanded the second division to step off in Longstreet's massive assault on the Union left flank. He achieved great success (at great cost in lives) in the areas known as the Wheatfield and the Peach Orchard, but the army as a whole was unable to dislodge the Union forces from their positions on Cemetery Ridge. His division did not participate in Pickett's Charge the next day, despite Longstreet's command of that assault.


McLaws accompanied Longstreet's corps to State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2.2%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,689,283 (16th)  - Density 53.29... Tennessee to come to the aid of General Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817_ September 27, 1876) was a general in the Confederate army during the American Civil War. Bragg was born in Warren County, North Carolina, and was educated at the United States Military Academy. He served in the Second Seminole War, and he won many promotions... Braxton Bragg's army. His division arrived too late to help at Battle of Chickamauga Conflict American Civil War Date September 18-20, 1863 Place Catoosa County and Walker County, Georgia Result Confederate victory The Battle of Chickamauga marked the end of a Union offensive in the American Civil War in Catoosa County and Walker County, Georgia from September 18, 1863 to... Chickamauga and The Battle of Chattanooga may refer to several American Civil War Battles: Battle of Chattanooga I Battle of Chattanooga II Battle of Chattanooga III (1863) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred... Chattanooga. In the Knoxville Campaign, Longstreet relieved McLaws for the failure of the attack on Battle of Fort Sanders Conflict American Civil War Date November 29, 1863 Place Knox County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Fort Sanders was an engagement of the American Civil War fought in Knoxville, Tennessee. The Confederacy had never had effective control of large areas of East Tennessee. There... Fort Sanders, citing inadequate preparations. A court of inquiry cleared McLaws of most charges, but it took the intercession of Jefferson Davis Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician. He served in the U.S. Congress and as a U.S. Secretary of War in the cabinet of President Franklin Pierce. He is most famous for serving as the first and only... Jefferson Davis to restore his command. Understandably, his relationship with Longstreet was ruined. He left the corps and, since Lee would not accept him for command in Virginia, he was sent to Georgia to defend (unsuccessfully) Savannah may refer to the following articles Cities Savannah, Georgia Savannah, Missouri Savannah, New York Savannah, Tennessee Other An alternate spelling of savanna - a type of grassland GNU Savannah - an aggregation of software development projects affiliated with the GNU project Savannah (film actress) - a pornographic film star SS Savannah, the... Savannah against Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. He served as a general in the United States Army during the American Civil War (1861–1865), achieving both recognition for this outstanding command... William T. Sherman's Major General William T. Sherman. Shermans March to the Sea is the name commonly given to a military campaign conducted in late 1864 by Major General William T. Sherman of the Union Army during the American Civil War. The campaign began with General Shermans troops leaving the captured... March to the Sea. McLaws surrendered with Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 - March 21, 1891) was a military officer in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, whose effectiveness was undercut by tensions with President Jefferson Davis. Joseph E. Johnston Born in Farmville, Virginia, Johnston attended West Point, graduating with the Class of 1829. When... Joseph E. Johnston's army in State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9.5%) Population (2000)  - Population 8,049,313 (11th)  - Density 63... North Carolina on April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). There are 249 days remaining. Events 1478 - The Pazzi attack Lorenzo de Medici and kill his brother Giuliano during High Mass in the Florence Cathedral. 1607 - English colonists make landfall at Cape Henry... April 26, 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. Events January 31 - American Civil War: Confederate General Robert E. Lee becomes general-in-chief. February - The Only known month in History without a Full moon. February 17 - American Civil War: Columbia, South Carolina burns as Confederate forces flee from advancing Union... 1865.


After the war, McLaws worked in the insurance business, served as Savannah's postmaster, and was active in Confederate veterans' organizations. Despite his wartime differences with Longstreet, McLaws initially defended Longstreet in the post-war attempts by Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. He was born in Franklin County, Virginia and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837. He fought against the Seminole in Florida before resigning from the army... Jubal Early and others to smear his reputation. Just before his death, however, his opinion changed about the lost cause movement, and he began speaking out about Longstreet's failures at Gettysburg.


Lafayette McLaws died in Savannah and is buried there in Laurel Grove Cemetery. He is the posthumous author of A Soldier's General: The Civil War Letters of Major General Lafayette McLaws (2002).


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lafayette McLaws - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (708 words)
Lafayette McLaws ( January 15, 1821 – July 24, 1897) was a U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.
During Robert E. Lee 's invasion of Maryland in 1862, McLaws' division was split from the rest of the corps, operated in conjunction with Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, and captured Maryland Heights at Harpers Ferry.
At the Battle of Fredericksburg, McLaws' was one of the divisions defending Marye's Heights and he satisfied Lee with his ferocious defensive performance.
A Soldier's General: The Civil War Letters of Major General Lafayette McLaws, edited by John C. Oeffinger. Excerpt from ... (6643 words)
Lafayette assigned his brother the task of cutting the road, "and by using ledges and hauling them by hand in other places, the difficulties were finally overcome and by 2 p.m.
McLaws bluffed Franklin into thinking that he faced a much larger concentration of troops than were present, and the Union general did not advance during the early morning hours of September 15.
Lafayette McLaws, the general known for his defensive tactics and emplacements, attempted the impossible, for the burden of stopping Sherman's advance into Savannah rested largely on his shoulders.
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