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Encyclopedia > Lady and the Tramp
Lady and the Tramp
Directed by Clyde Geronomi
Wilfred Jackson
Hamilton Luske
Produced by Walt Disney
Written by Ward Greene (novel)
Erdman Penner
Joe Rinaldi
Ralph Wright
Don DaGradi
Joe Grant (early 1943 concept as seen on the DVD)
Starring Peggy Lee
Barbara Luddy
Larry Roberts
Bill Thompson
Bill Baucom
Stan Freberg
Verna Felton
Alan Reed
George Givot
Dallas McKennon
Lee Millar
The Mellomen
Distributed by Buena Vista Distribution
Release date(s) June 16, 1955
Running time 75 minutes
Language English
Budget $4,000,000
Followed by Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure (2001)
IMDb profile

Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney, and originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution. The fifteenth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon, it was the first animated feature filmed in the Cinemascope widescreen film process. The story pairs a female Cocker Spaniel named Lady who lives with a rich family and a male mutt named Tramp who lives on the streets. Once the two of them meet, they share an adventure together and eventually fall in love. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x628, 39 KB)Lady and the Tramp This is a copyrighted poster. ... Wilfred Jackson (January 24, 1906–August 7, 1988) was an American animator, arranger, composer and director best known for his work on the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series of cartoons from The Walt Disney Company. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Ralph Wright was born on September 12, 1906 in St. ... Don DaGradi was a Disney writer who started out as a layout artist on 1940s cartoons including Der Fuehrers Face in 1943. ... Joe Grant (May 15, 1908 - May 6, 2005) was a Disney artist and writer. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... Barbara Luddy (25 May 1908-1 April 1979) was an American actress from Great Falls, Montana. ... Bill Thompson (July 8, 1913 – July 15, 1971) was an American radio actor and voice actor whose career stretched from the 1930s until his death. ... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is an American author, recording artist, animation voice actor, comedian, puppeteer and advertising creative director. ... Verna Felton (July 20, 1890 – December 14, 1966) is a voice actor, who was best-known for playing most of the female voices in Disney animated films. ... Alan Reed (August 20, 1907 – June 14, 1977) was the voice of Fred Flintstone on The Flintstones and various spin_off series. ... Dallas R. McKennon (July 19, 1919-) is an American actor, sometimes credited as Dal McKennon, with extensive work as a voice actor. ... The Mellomen were a popular singing quartet active from the late 1940s through the mid-1970s. ... Buena Vista production logo, 1950s. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Animation refers to the technique in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Buena Vista production logo, 1950s. ... Animation refers to the technique in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... This is a list of theatrical animated feature films produced and/or released by Walt Disney Productions/The Walt Disney Company: // Official canon (Walt Disney Animated Classics) The following is a list of the forty-eight feature films part of the Walt Disney Feature Animation (WDFA) canon, also known as... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ... Cocker Spaniel refers to two different breeds of dogs, both of which are commonly called simply Cocker Spaniel in their countries of origin: They are hunter dogs. ... A healthy mixed-breed dog shows hybrid vigor. ...

Contents

Plot Synopsis

Lady is a Christmas gift from "Jim Dear" to his wife, "Jane Darling" (as Lady hears them call each other) and soon quickly becomes the center of their attention. When Lady is six months old, she is given a collar and a license and is able to leave the house. She has friends named Jock and Trusty, both of whom she has known for some time. A little later, she befriended another dog — a stray dog called Tramp. When Lady becomes concerned that Darling is becoming pregnant, the streetwise Tramp describes it as an omen for things to come, claiming that "when the baby moves in, the dog moves out". Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Generally, a collar is something which goes around the neck. ... This article is about human pregnancy in biological females. ... Examples of omens from the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493): natural phenomena and strange births. ...


Darling then has a baby son and Lady feels that Jim Dear and Darling are not giving her as much attention as before. Soon after the baby is born, Jim Dear and Darling go away for a few days and Aunt Sarah comes to the house to look after the baby. Aunt Sarah has two Siamese cats, Si and Am, who are curious and interested in exploring, regardless of the mischief they create. During the memorable musical number "We Are Siamese," Lady manages to keep the goldfish and canary safe from harm, but she begins to bark when the two cats go up the stairs to see the baby and steal its milk. Lady scares Si and Am and they pretend to have been hurt. Aunt Sarah then takes Lady to a pet shop to have her fitted with a muzzle, but Lady runs away. The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognised breeds of Oriental cat. ... A muzzle can be: The mouth of a firearm, see firearm muzzle The projecting nose of an animal, see animal muzzle An arrangement of straps used to bind an animal muzzle shut, or otherwise prevent it from biting. ...


Lady comes face to face with a group of vicious dogs on the other side of town, but Tramp arrives on the scene and rescues Lady. Tramp then takes Lady around the town, introducing her to a few of his friends, including a beaver who is duped into removing Lady's muzzle, then is allowed to keep it as an aid for pulling exceptionally large logs. Tramp then takes Lady to Tony's Italian Restaurant, where Joe the cook prepares them a special spaghetti meal, courtesy of human chef Tony. After that, they decide to stay for the night on a hill on a date. The next morning, Lady feels homesick and, while going back to her home, she and the Tramp head for the farm, where he scares away the chickens. During all the ruckus, Lady is captured by the dog catcher and taken to the dog pound, where she does not stay for long. While she was imprisoned in the rough pound, the other dogs there talked about the many girlfriends Tramp has and how he'll never settle down--just keep breakin' hearts. Because Lady has a dog's license, Lady is soon identified and taken home, but Aunt Sarah chains her to a kennel in the garden to keep her from running away. A kennel is the name given to any structure or shelter for dogs. ...


Jock and Trusty both come to see Lady, but she is not in the mood for visitors. When Tramp comes, she is furious with him due to the dogs at the pound telling her about Tramp's previous girlfriends, and does not want to see him again. However, Tramp does return and Lady tells him that a rat has gone into the baby's room. Tramp enters the house and soon comes face to face with the rat. Tramp chases the rat around the bedroom and eventually manages to kill it, but in the process he tips over the baby's crib. Aunt Sarah calls the dog pound and demands that the dog catcher come to collect Tramp; meanwhile, Lady is locked in the cellar. Just as the dog catcher is collecting Tramp, Jim Dear and Darling return. They then unlock the cellar door and release Lady. Lady begins barking frantically and runs upstairs. Aunt Sarah, Jim Dear and Darling all follow her and see the dead rat and everyone realizes that Lady and Tramp had entered the house to catch the rat.


Jock and Trusty are both waiting outside the house and hear about the rat. They decide to go after the dog catcher's wagon while the Darling's and Lady race in their car to intercept it. While Trusty tries to sniff out the wagon's trail, Jock tells him that he knows that he has lost his sense of smell, but Trusty manages to pick its scent. After tracking it down they run towards the wagon while it is just yards away from the dog pound. They confront the horses which are pulling the wagon and it topples over into a tree. Several passers-by are helping the driver and trying to release the horses when a taxi pulls up and Jim Dear and Lady get out. Tramp is released from the wagon, while Trusty is trapped under the wheel. Jock is convinced Trusty is dead and he begins to howl in anguish.


At Christmas time with Tramp long adopted by the Darlings, Lady gives birth to her and Tramp's four puppies, and they are all photographed together with the baby. Just then, Jock and Trusty arrive; it turns out Trusty had actually survived the accident, left only with an injured leg.


Characters

  • Lady: A cute, pampered but very loving female American Cocker Spaniel.
  • Tramp: A mutt (possibly part a Airedale Terrier) with a knack for dodging dog-catchers and ability to pick locks.
  • Jock: A Scottish terrier with the accent to prove it, Jock is a show dog with numerous trophies.
  • Trusty: A Bloodhound who used to track criminals with his Grandpappy, Old Reliable, until he lost his sense of smell.
  • Si & Am: Twin Siamese cats with a knack for mischief and never-ending trouble, owned by Aunt Sara.
  • Peg: A sassy, stray female Lhasa Apso, whom Lady meets, (along with the other dog inmates she was put in a cage with), when she is caught by the dog pound. It is implied that she had a relationship with Tramp in the past, through the lyrics of the song she sings, (He's A Tramp). She was formerly from the dog and pony follies (dog and pony show), either the shows ended or she was left behind. Created for singer Peggy Lee and with her blonde bangs look, to be a part of the movie.[1]
  • Toughy: A stray male mongrel from the dog pound.
  • Boris: A stray male Russian wolfhound; from the dog pound. He talks with a Russian accent.
  • Pedro: A stray male chihuahua from the dog pound. He talks with a Mexican accent.
  • Bull: A stray male Bulldog; from the dog pound. He talks with a slight Cockney accent.
  • Dachsie: A stray male Dachshund at the dog pound. He talks with a German accent.
  • Jim Dear: name as known by Lady, the fatherly human figure.
  • Darling: name as known by Lady, wife of Jim Dear and motherly human figure.
  • Aunt Sarah: She comes to take care of the baby when Jim Dear and Darling leave for a few days.
  • Tony: Owner and chef of Tony's Italian restaurant.
  • Joe: Tony's assistant chef.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A healthy mixed-breed dog shows hybrid vigor. ... The Airedale Terrier (often shortened to Airedale) is a terrier dog breed originating from Airedale in Yorkshire, England. ... The Scottish Terrier (also known as the Aberdeen Terrier), popularly called the Scottie, is a breed of dog best known for its distinctive profile. ... For other uses, see Bloodhound (disambiguation). ... The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognised breeds of Oriental cat. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Animal shelters or (dog) pounds are either governmental or private organizations that provide temporary homes for stray or surrendered pet animals, most often dogs and cats, until the animal is reclaimed by the owner, adopted to a new owner, placed with another organization, or euthanized. ... Dog and pony show was a colloquial term used in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century to refer to small traveling circuses that toured through small towns and rural areas. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... A healthy mixed-breed dog shows hybrid vigor. ... Country of origin Russia Classification and breed standards The Borzoi is a breed of dog also called the Russian Wolfhound. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Bulldog (disambiguation). ... The dachshund is a short-legged, elongated dog breed of the hound family. ...

History

Production

The film was based loosely on two previous works: a short story written by Ward Greene, called Happy Dan, The Cynical Dog, published in the mid-1940s in Cosmopolitan (a literary magazine at that time), about a mutt from the wrong side of the tracks; and a story line worked on for several years by Disney story man Joe Grant and others at the Disney studio, about a Cocker Spaniel named Lady, loosely based on Grant's own pet, a Springer Spaniel named Lady (his dog was brown and white while Lady was honey-colored all over). Greene later wrote a novelization of the film that was released two years before the film itself, at Walt Disney's insistence, so that audiences would be familiar with the story.[2] June 1936 issue Cosmopolitan is a magazine for women, sometimes referred to as Cosmo, which has been published for more than a century. ... Joe Grant (May 15, 1908 - May 6, 2005) was a Disney artist and writer. ... It has been suggested that Residential pets be merged into this article or section. ... A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ...


The finished film is slightly different from what was originally planned. In early script versions, Tramp was first called Homer, then Rags and Bozo. Although both the original script and the final product both shared most of the same elements, it would still be revised and revamped. Originally, Lady was to have only one next door neighbor, a Ralph Bellamy-type canine named Hubert. Hubert was later replaced by Jock and Trusty. There were numerous scenes thought up but then deleted, as well. One scene created but then deleted was one in which, while Lady fears of the arrival of the baby, she has a "Parade of the Shoes" nightmare (similar to Dumbo's "Pink Elephants on Parade" nightmare) where a baby bootie splits in two, then four, and continues to multiply. The dream shoes then fade into real shoes, their wearer exclaiming that the baby has been born. Another cut scene was one in song, while Lady and Tramp are at the park, they engage in a bizarre Dog's World fantasy in which the roles of both dogs and humans are switched; the dogs are the masters and vice-versa. Ralph Rexford Bellamy (June 17, 1904 – November 29, 1991) was a Tony Award-winning American actor with a career spanning sixty-two years. ... Dumbo is a 1941 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and first released on October 23, 1941 by RKO Radio Pictures. ...


The character that eventually became Aunt Sarah was softened for the movie, in comparison with earlier treatments, where she was a very stereotyped battleaxe of a mother-in-law. In the film, she is a well-meaning busybody of a maiden aunt (revealed to be the sister of Darling's mother in the Greene novelization) who adores her cats, but is very nervous about dogs of any kind, and particularly does not believe that dogs should be around babies. She was more sympathetic in the Ward Greene novelization, where she actually rides to The Tramp's rescue in her electric car, after the dead rat is found. Likewise, the two cats (Si and Am) are more mischievous than evil in the film. However, earlier versions of the storyline, drafted in 1943, during the War, show them as a sinister pair suggesting the yellow peril, and named Nip and Tuck. In Ward Greene's novelization, they tearfully express remorse over causing Tramp's impending execution by hiding the rat's body as a joke, and then try to make amends--in the film, they simply don't figure in the climax at all, and the body of the rat isn't seen until Lady brings it to the attention of the humans. The rat, a somewhat comical character in some early versions, became a great deal more frightening, due to the need to ratchet up dramatic tension--though he was a decidedly malevolent bloodthirsty figure in Greene's 1953 book, so this conception must have been jettisoned very early on. The finished film doesn't really have much to say about Aunt Sarah or the cats, after they serve their purpose in the narrative (to get Lady out on the streets, and Tramp sent off to the pound). Si and Am are not seen after their memorable song sequence, and Aunt Sarah is only briefly mentioned at the end of the film, when it is mentioned that she has sent some dog biscuits for Christmas, presumably as an apology for having so badly misunderstood Lady and Tramp. The Yellow Terror In All His Glory, 1899 editorial cartoon Yellow Peril (sometimes Yellow Terror) was a color metaphor for race that originated in the late nineteenth century with immigration of Chinese laborers to various Western countries, notably the United States, and later to the Japanese during the mid 20th...


In pre-production, Jim Dear was known as Jim Brown, and Darling was named Elizabeth. These were dropped, presumably because the humans in Lady's life were meant to be known by the names Lady always heard them call each other. In a very early version, published as a short story in a 1944 Disney children's anthology, Lady refers to them as 'Mister' and 'Missis.'


Also, the plot originally intended to have Trusty died at the end of the film while saving Tramp from the dogcatcher, which is why Jock howls at his accident. Walt Disney, however, did not want a repeat of the controversy concerning the death of the mother in Bambi, and therefore Trusty was written into the epilogue sequence to say that he was merely injured. Since he had clearly not been around for several months, one must assume he had to have extensive surgery, and when he appears again he only has a bandaged leg. This article is about the 1942 Walt Disney film. ...


The famous spaghetti scene and the following night in the park is one of the most romantic moments in all of Disney animation. Like the sequence with Lady at the pound, it does not appear at all in Ward Greene's novelization, or any other earlier version of the story. It has been parodied on many occasions, including in the film's own sequel, Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure.

1986 Lady and the Tramp re-release poster.

Image File history File links Tramprereleaseposter. ... Image File history File links Tramprereleaseposter. ...

Re-release schedule and home video

The film was reissued to theaters in 1962, 1971, 1980, and 1986, and on videotape in 1987 (this was in Disney's The Classics video series. A Disney Limited Issue series DVD was released on November 23, 1999. It was remastered and restored for DVD on February 28, 2006, as the seventh installment of Platinum Edition series. [3] One million copies of the Platinum Edition were sold on February 28, 2006 [4] The Platinum Edition DVD went on moratorium on January 31, 2007, along with the 2006 DVD reissue of Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure [5] This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Platinum Editions are a series of DVDs put out by The Walt Disney Company. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Peggy Lee, who, along with Sonny Burke, created the songs for the film, later sued Disney for breach of contract claiming that she still retained rights to the transcripts, including those to videotrape. She was awarded $2.3m, but not without a lengthy legal battle with the studio which was finally settled in 1991. [6]

Lady and the Tramp theatrical release history

Worldwide release dates

is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...

Trivia

  • Presented in an aspect ratio of 2.55:1 it is, to date, the widest film that Disney has ever produced.
  • Surprisingly enough, Tramp himself never refers to himself by that name, at least on-screen, but is instead referred to by pretty much two thirds in the film's canine cast (save Jock and Trusty) by the name at one point or another, including Lady, who recognized the name when it was brought up, which indicates that he did at some point tell her he was called the Tramp. It isn't until the second film in which any human calls him Tramp and it is never explained why they 'named' him with the very name he was known by on the streets.
  • Walt Disney's Comic Digest - issue #54 has A New Adventure of Lady and the Tramp dated copyright 1955.[7]
  • This film began a spinoff comic titled Scamp, named after one of Lady and Tramp's puppies. It was first written by Ward Greene[citation needed] and was published from October 31, 1955 until 1988.[8] [9] Scamp also stars in a direct-to-video sequel in 2001 titled Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure.
  • The Beaver in this film seemed to be the inspiration for Gopher in Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree (1966), down to the speech pattern (a whistling sound when he makes the "S" sound). This voice was created by Stan Freberg, who has an extensive background in commercial and comedy recording voice overs and soundtracks. On the DVD he demonstrates how it was done and that a whistle was eventually used because it was hard to continue repeating the effect.[10]
  • Before animating the fight between Tramp and the rat, animator Wolfgang Reitherman kept rats in a cage next to his desk to study their actions.
  • According to legend, the film's opening sequence, in which Darling unwraps a hat box on Christmas morning and finds Lady inside, is based upon an actual incident in Walt Disney's life. After he'd forgotten a dinner date with his wife, he made it up to her by offering her the puppy-in-the-hat-box surprise and was immediately forgiven.
  • Jock's real name, as is revealed during the movie, is "Hether Lad o' Glen-Cairn." Jock was not the only character who was the subject of a name-game either. In fact, Lady was just about the only character who did not at one point or another have a different suggested name. For instance, prior to being "Tramp," Tramp went through a number of suggested names including Homer, Rags and Bozo. It was thought in the 1950s that the name "Tramp" would not be acceptable, but since Walt Disney approved of the choice, it was considered safe under his acceptance. On early story boards shown on the Backstage Disney DVD had listed description "a tramp dog" with "Homer" or one of the mentioned prior names.[11] Clearly, the movie's title was influenced by the pop standard "The Lady is a Tramp".
  • Tramp had other names in the movie, and when asked by Lady about having a family, Tramp states, "I have a different family for every day of the week, point is none of them have me." Each family mentioned had a different name, nationality, and meal. Since he doesn't belong to a single family, Tramp implies it is easier than the baby problems Lady is going through. "When you're footloose and collar free, you have no worries."[12]
  • Even though Trusty survives in the film, death is still shown in the dog pound. A dog known as "Nutsy" is put down. He is taken away and the lights sort of blink, and Lady asks, "You mean he's..." and the reply was yes. In the case of Lady and the Tramp it was to show what Tramp's fate would be with the dog catcher. This is done in future Disney animation, as in The Fox and the Hound. Tod's mother is shot at the beginning of the film and we see the skins of animals including foxes later in the film. This is unlike Bambi, where audiences were familiar with Bambi's mother.
  • Due to the fact that the story is told from a dog's perspective, Darling and Jim's faces were rarely shown. Darling's face was shown more often than Jim's, but they were usually shown only for a brief second. However, their faces don't remain mysteries to viewers. Models of the rooms of the house were used to aid in production of the film.[13]
  • This is probably the only Disney film where the heroes of the film's climax, Jock and Trusty, are not the main protagonists.
  • There is a possible chance that the scene where Tramp kills the rat, but is then suspected of harming the baby, is inspired by the dog Gelert from the famous Welsh legend.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... In the 1955 movie Lady and the Tramp, Scamp is the rambunctious son of the title characters, Lady and Tramp, seen only briefly at the end of the movie. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This page may meet Wikipedia’s criteria for speedy deletion. ... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is an American author, recording artist, animation voice actor, comedian, puppeteer and advertising creative director. ... Wolfgang Reitherman (June 26, 1909 - May 22, 1985), also known and sometimes credited as Woolie Reitherman, was a famed Disney animator and one of Disneys Nine Old Men. ... Bozo the Clown is the name of a clown whose widespread syndication in early television made him the best-known clown character in the United States. ... The term pop standards refers to an American songwriting, arranging, and singing style that is widely considered as the high point of Western vocal popular music. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... This article is about the 1942 Walt Disney film. ... Perspective when used in the context of vision and visual perception refers to the way in which objects appear to the eye based on their spatial attributes or dimension and the position of the eye relative to the objects. ... Marceline is a city in Chariton and Linn County, Missouri. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Gelerts Grave, Beddgelert Gelert is the name of a legendary dog associated with the village of Beddgelert (Welsh: Gelerts Grave) in North Wales. ...

Popular Culture

  • In the music video of Avril Lavigne's 2007 single, Girlfriend, the creators mention the scene where the geeky version of Avril and her boyfriend are having a long loaf of bread as a re-enactment of the scene where Lady and the Tramp accidentally engage in a kiss during their dinner.
  • In Kingdom Hearts, there's a fountain in the Third District that included a statue of Lady and Tramp.

Hot Shots! Part Deux is a 1993 comedy spoof film, and a sequel to the 1991 comedy Hot Shots! Directed again by Jim Abrahams, the film again stars Charlie Sheen, Lloyd Bridges, Valeria Golino, Richard Crenna, Brenda Bakke, Miguel Ferrer, Ryan Stiles, Rowan Atkinson, and Jerry Haleva. ... 102 Dalmatians is a 2000 live-action film, produced by The Walt Disney Company and starring Glenn Close as the villainous Cruella de Vil. ... The Shaggy Dog is the title of two films, The Shaggy Dog (1959 film) The Shaggy Dog (1994 film) The Shaggy Dog (2006 film). ... Avril Ramona Lavigne Whibley[1] (born September 27, 1984) is a Canadian rock singer and musician. ... Girlfriend is a song by Avril Lavigne, and was the lead single from her third album, The Best Damn Thing (2007). ... This article contains information on the first Kingdom Hearts video game. ... The House of Mouse is a Disney cartoon show where Mickey Mouse and his friends run a nighclub called The House of Mouse, which shows Disney cartons as part of its floor show. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ...

Soundtrack Listing

  1. Main Title (Bella Notte)/The Wag of a Dog's Tail
  2. Peace on Earth (Silent Night)
  3. It Has a Ribbon/Lady to Bed/A Few Mornings Later
  4. Sunday/The Rat/Morning Paper
  5. A New Collar/Jock & Trusty/It's Jim Dear
  6. What a Day!/Breakfast at Tony's
  7. Warning/Breakout/Snob Hill/A Wee Bairn
  8. Countdown to B-Day
  9. Baby's First Morning/What Is a Baby/La La Lu
  10. Going Away/Aunt Sarah
  11. The Siamese Cat Song/What's Going on Down There
  12. The Muzzle/Wrong Side of the Tracks
  13. You Poor Kid/He's Not My Dog
  14. Through the Zoo/A Log Puller
  15. Footloose and Collar-Free/Belle Notte
  16. It's Morning/Ever Chase Chickens/Caught
  17. Home Sweet Home
  18. The Pound
  19. What a Dog/He's a Tramp
  20. In the Doghouse/The Rat Returns/Falsely Accused/We've Got to Stop That Wagon/Trusty's Sacrifice
  21. Watch the Birdie/Visitors
  22. Finale (Peace on Earth)

Autograph of the carol by Gruber Silent Night (Stille Nacht) is a traditional and popular Christmas carol. ...

Voice cast

Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... Barbara Luddy (25 May 1908-1 April 1979) was an American actress from Great Falls, Montana. ... Bill Thompson (July 8, 1913 – July 15, 1971) was an American radio actor and voice actor whose career stretched from the 1930s until his death. ... Howard Morris (September 4, 1919 – May 21, 2005) was an American comic actor and director. ... Verna Felton (July 20, 1890 – December 14, 1966) is a voice actor, who was best-known for playing most of the female voices in Disney animated films. ... Alan Reed (August 20, 1907 – June 14, 1977) was the voice of Fred Flintstone on The Flintstones and various spin_off series. ... Ravenscrofts 1970 gospel album Great Hymns in Story and Song Thurl Arthur Ravenscroft (February 6, 1914 – May 22, 2005) was an American voice actor and singer with a deep, booming voice. ... Dallas R. McKennon (July 19, 1919-) is an American actor, sometimes credited as Dal McKennon, with extensive work as a voice actor. ... The Mellomen were a popular singing quartet active from the late 1940s through the mid-1970s. ...

Directing Animators

Milton Erwin Kahl (born March 22, 1909, in San Francisco, California, USA; died April 19, 1987, in Mill Valley, California, USA, of pneumonia) was an animator for the Disney studio. ... Franklin Thomas (September 5, 1912, Fresno, California - September 8, 2004, Flintridge, California) was one of Walt Disneys team of animators known as the Nine Old Men. ... Oliver Martin Johnston, Jr. ... John Lounsbery (March 9, 1911 - February 13, 1976) was an American animator who worked for The Walt Disney Company. ... Wolfgang Reitherman (June 26, 1909 - May 22, 1985), also known and sometimes credited as Woolie Reitherman, was a famed Disney animator and one of Disneys Nine Old Men. ... Eric Larson (September 3, 1905-October 25, 1988) was an animator for the Walt Disney Studios in the early 20th century and was one of the Disneys Nine Old Men. ... Les Clark (November 17, 1907-September 12, 1979 was the first of Disneys Nine Old Men. ...

See also

This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or of a poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ...

References

  1. ^ Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 1 'Closed caption track, states the term dog and pony follies - 'which best links to subject dog and pony show'
  2. ^ Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 2 'Disney backstage, Ward Greene involvement with the creation of the story'
  3. ^ [1]' Platinum Edition'
  4. ^ [2]'sales info of the DVD'
  5. ^ [3]'Lady and the Tramp II information'
  6. ^ [4] 'BBC News June 26, 2002'
  7. ^ Walt Disney Comics Digest #54 - Labeled IVR D.D.B.P #2 (Donald Duck's Beach Party #2)
  8. ^ Western Publishing Company-Whitman copyright dates 1959, 1958, 1957 in that order, Only initials WR-W.D.C. ??-Walt Disney Company
  9. ^ Scamp #25 Gold Key comics Western Publishing is more recent, date September 1975
  10. ^ Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 2 'Disney backstage, Stan Freberg demonstration of beaver voice and use of a whistle'
  11. ^ Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 2 'Disney backstage, story boards shown from the making of the movie show the name a tramp dog'
  12. ^ Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 1 'text of the movie Tramp explaining his life'
  13. ^ Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 2 'Disney backstage, models of rooms of the house used for the animators to view the dog perspective'

is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lady and the Tramp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2056 words)
Lady is a gift from Jim Dear to his wife Darling one Christmas and soon quickly becomes the center of their attention.
During all the ruckus, Lady is captured by the dog catcher and taken to the dog pound, where she does not stay for long.
Tramp chases the rat all over the bedroom eventually manages to kill it, but in the process he tips over the baby's cot and Aunt Sarah is awakened by the baby crying.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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