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Encyclopedia > Lady Chatterley's Lover
Lady Chatterley's Lover
Author D. H. Lawrence
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Romance
Publisher Amereon
Publication date 1928
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
ISBN ISBN 0-8488-0559-3

Lady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence written in 1928. Lady Chatterleys Lover is a 1981 film directed by Just Jaeckin, and starring Sylvia Kristel and Nicholas Clay Sylvia Kristel . ... Image File history File links Lady_Chatterleys_Lover. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was a very important and controversial English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism and personal letters. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... See also: 1927 in literature, other events of 1928, 1929 in literature, list of years in literature. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN-13 represented as EAN-13 bar code (in this case ISBN 978-3-16-148410-0) The International Standard Book Number, ISBN, is a unique[1] commercial book identifier barcode. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was a very important and controversial English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism and personal letters. ... See also: 1927 in literature, other events of 1928, 1929 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Printed privately in Florence in 1928, it was not printed in the United Kingdom until 1960. Lawrence considered calling this book Tenderness at one time and made significant alterations to the original manuscript in order to make it palatable to readers. It has been published in three different versions. Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ...


The publication of the book caused a scandal due to its explicit sex scenes, including previously banned four-letter words, and perhaps particularly because the lovers were a working-class male and an aristocratic female. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ...


The story is said to have originated from events in Lawrence's own unhappy domestic life, and he took inspiration for the settings of the book from Ilkeston in Derbyshire where he lived for a while. According to some critics the fling of Lady Ottoline Morrell with "Tiger", a young stonemason who came to carve plinths for her garden statues also influenced the story [1]. Ilkeston is a town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands region of England, on the River Erewash. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Lady Ottoline Morrell (June 16, 1873 - April 21, 1938) was an English socialite, friend and patron of many artistic people, including Aldous Huxley, Siegfried Sassoon and D. H. Lawrence. ...

Contents

Plot

The story concerns a young married woman, Constance (Lady Chatterley), whose upper-class husband, Clifford Chatterley, has been paralyzed and rendered impotent. Her sexual frustration leads her into an affair with the gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors. This novel is about Constance's realization that she cannot live with the mind alone, she must also be alive physically.


Themes

Mind and body

Richard Hoggart argues that the main subject of Lady Chatterley's Lover is not the sexual passages that were the subject of such debate, but the search for integrity and wholeness.[1] Key to this integrity is cohesion between the mind and the body for "body without mind is brutish; mind without body…is a running away from our double being."[2] Lady Chatterley's Lover focuses on the incoherence of living a life that is "all mind", which Lawrence saw as particularly true among the young members of the aristocratic classes, as in his description of Constance and her sister Hilda's "tentative love-affairs" in their youth: Richard Hoggart (born September 24, 1918) is a British sociologist, widely known for his 1957 book The Uses of Literacy. ...

So they had given the gift of themselves, each to the youth with whom she had the most subtle and intimate arguments. The arguments, the discussions were the great thing: the love-making and connexion were only sort of primitive reversion and a bit of an anti-climax.[3]

The contrast between mind and body can be seen in the dissatisfaction each has with their previous relationships: Constance's lack of intimacy with her husband who is "all mind", and Mellors' choice to live apart from his wife due to her "brutish" sexual nature.[4] These dissatisfactions lead them into a relationship that builds very slowly and is based upon tenderness, physical passion, and mutual respect. As the relationship between Lady Chatterley and Mellors develops, they learn more about the interrelation of the mind and the body; she learns that sex is more than a shameful and disappointing act and he learns about the spiritual challenges that come from physical love.


Controversy

British obscenity trial

When it was published in Britain in 1960, the trial of the publishers, Penguin Books, under the Obscene Publications Act of 1959 was a major public event and a test of the new obscenity law. The 1959 act, introduced by Roy Jenkins, had made it possible for publishers to escape conviction if they could show that a work was of literary merit. One of the objections was to the frequent use of the word "fuck" and its derivatives. It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ... Since 1857, a series of obscenity laws known as the Obscene Publications Acts have governed what can be published. ... Obscenity in Latin obscenus, meaning foul, repulsive, detestable, (possibly derived from ob caenum, literally from filth). The term is most often used in a legal context to describe expressions (words, images, actions) that offend the prevalent sexual morality of the time. ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... Literary Merit a written text has Liteary Merit if it is a work of quality, that is if it has some aesthetic value. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Various academic critics, including E. M. Forster, Helen Gardner, Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams, Norman St John-Stevas were called as witnesses, and the verdict, delivered on November 2, 1960, was not guilty. This resulted in a far greater degree of freedom for publishing explicit material in the UK. The prosecution was ridiculed for being out of touch with changing social norms when the chief prosecutor, Mervyn Griffith-Jones, asked if it were the kind of book "you would wish your wife or servants to read". Edward Morgan Forster, OM, (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970) was an English novelist, short story writer, and essayist. ... Helen Gardner (1909-1986) was an English literary critic. ... Richard Hoggart (born September 24, 1918) is a British sociologist, widely known for his 1957 book The Uses of Literacy. ... Raymond Henry Williams (31 August 1921 - 26 January 1988) was a Welsh academic, novelist and critic. ... Norman Anthony Francis St John-Stevas, Baron St John of Fawsley, PC (born May 18, 1929), is a British Conservative politician, author and barrister. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2006, this was dramatised by BBC Wales as The Chatterley Affair. BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... The Chatterley Affair is a BBC television drama broadcast on BBC Four on March 20, 2006. ...


Australia

Not only was the book banned in Australia, but a book describing the British trial, The Trial of Lady Chatterley, was also banned. A copy was smuggled into the country, and then published widely. The fallout from this event eventually led to the easing of censorship of books in the country. However the country still retains the Office of Film and Literature Classification. When the office considers material to be too offensive or obscene it will refuse to classify the material. Material that fails to receive a classification cannot be distributed. Its officers are called "classifiers", not "censors". [2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Censorship is defined as the removal and/or withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


United States

Lady Chatterley's Lover was one of a trio of books (the others being Tropic of Cancer and Fanny Hill), the ban on which was fought and overturned in court with assistance by lawyer Charles Rembar in 1959. Tropic of Cancer is a novel by Henry Miller, first published in 1934 by Obelisk Press in Paris and still in print (Grove Press 1987 paperback: ISBN 0-8021-3178-6). ... Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, also known as Fanny Hill, is a novel by John Cleland. ... Ç ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The movie version was the subject of attempted censorship in New York State on the grounds that it promoted adultery. The Supreme Court held that the law prohibiting its showing was a violation of the First Amendment's protection of Free Speech. [3] For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ...


India

In 1964, bookseller Ranjit Udeshi in Bombay was prosecuted under Sec. 292 of the Indian Penal Code (sale of obscene books) for selling an unexpurgated copy of Lady Chatterley's Lover. Indian Penal Code (IPC) provides a penal code for all of India excluding Jammu and Kashmir. ...


Ranjit D. Udeshi v. State of Maharashtra (AIR 1968 SC 881) was eventually laid before a three-judge bench of the Supreme Court of India, where in a highly erudite judgement, Chief Justice Hidayatullah declared the law on the subject of when a book can be regarded as obscene and established important tests of obscenity such as the Hicklin test. The Hicklin test is a legal concept, from the 1868 English case - Regina v. ...


The judgement upheld the conviction, stating that

"When everything said in its favour we find that in treating with sex the impugned portions viewed separately and also in the setting of the whole book pass the permissible limits judged of from our community standards and as there is no social gain to us which can be said to preponderate, we must hold the book to satisfy the test we have indicated above."

Cultural influence

In the United States the free publication of Lady Chatterley's Lover was a significant event in the "sexual revolution". At the time the book was a topic of widespread discussion and a byword of sorts. In 1965, Tom Lehrer recorded a satirical song entitled Smut, in which the speaker in the song lyrics cheerfully acknowledges his enjoyment of such material; "Who needs a hobby like tennis or philately?/I've got a hobby: rereading Lady Chatterley." This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Andrew (Tom) Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. ...


British poet Philip Larkin's poem "Annus Mirabilis" begins with a reference to the trial: Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ...


Sexual intercourse began
In nineteen sixty-three
(which was rather late for me) -
Between the end of the "Chatterley" ban
And The Beatles' first LP. It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Beatles released twelve original albums, twelve EPs (featuring mostly otherwise available material), one double EP, and twenty-two singles (featuring mostly otherwise unavailable material) in eight years (1962-1970) in their native United Kingdom. ...


By the 1970s, the story had become sufficiently safe in Britain to be parodied by Morecambe and Wise; a "play wot Ernie wrote" was obviously based on it, with Michele Dotrice as the Lady Chatterley figure. Introducing it, Ernie explained that his play was "about a man who has an accident with a combine harvester, which unfortunately makes him impudent". Morecambe and Wise Morecambe and Wise were a famous British comic double act comprising Eric Morecambe OBE and Ernie Wise OBE. The act lasted four decades until Morecambes retirement, shortly before his death in 1984. ... Michele Dotrice (b. ... A postage stamp of a combine honors Russian agriculture. ...


Standard editions

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
  • The First and Second Lady Chatterley Novels, edited by Dieter Mehl and Christa Jansohn, Cambridge University Press, 1999, ISBN 0-521-47116-8. These two books, The First Lady Chatterley and John Thomas and Lady Jane were earlier drafts of Lawrence's last novel

A Swedish edition: In 1950, a Swedish paperback edition, copyright Jan Förlag, was published by Victor Pettersons Bokindustriaktiebolag Stockholm. It is marked "Unexpurgated authorized edition." Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... John Thomas and Lady Jane is a novel written by D.H. Lawrence originally published in 1927. ...


Adaptions

Radio

Lady Chatterley's Lover has been adapted for BBC Radio 4 by acclaimed writer Michelene Wandor and was first broadcast in September 2006 BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ...


Film and television

In 1955 Danielle Darrieux starred in the film Lady Chatterley's Lover. Due to its content, the film was banned by the Catholic censors in the United States. Danielle Darrieux Danielle Yvonne Marie Antoinette Darrieux (born May 1, 1917 in Bordeaux, France) is a French singer and actress. ...

DVD cover of Lady Chatterley's Lover (1981)
Main article, see Lady Chatterley's Lover (film)

There have been three major adaptations. A 1981 film version by Just Jaeckin starring Sylvia Kristel and Nicholas Clay and in 1993 a version entitled Lady Chatterley directed by Ken Russell starring Joely Richardson and Sean Bean for BBC Television. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Lady Chatterleys Lover is a 1981 film directed by Just Jaeckin, and starring Sylvia Kristel and Nicholas Clay Sylvia Kristel . ... Lady Chatterleys Lover is a 1981 film directed by Just Jaeckin, and starring Sylvia Kristel and Nicholas Clay Sylvia Kristel . ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Biography Just Jaeckin is a French film director. ... Sylvia Kristel (September 28, 1952 in Utrecht), pronounced kri-STELL, is a Dutch actress, model and singer. ... Nicholas Anthony Phillip Clay (September 18, 1946 - May 25, 2000) was a British actor. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an iconoclastic English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... Joely Kim Richardson (born 9 January 1965) is an English actress. ... Shaun Mark Bean (born 17 April 1959) is an English film and stage actor. ...


In 2006 the French director Pascale Ferran [4] filmed a French Language version with Marina Hands as Constance and Jean-Louis Coulloc'h as Parkin, which won the coveted Cesar Award for Best Film in 2007. Marina Hands was chosen best actress at the 2007 Tribeca Film Festival [5]. The film was based on "John Thomas and Lady Jane", Lawrence's second version of the story. When this film appears on French TV it will be presented as Lady Chatterley et l'homme des bois (Lady Chatterley and the Man of the Woods). It was broadcast on the Arte channel on 22 June 2007. Lady Chatterley is a French film by Pascale Ferran with Marina Hands which won the 2007 César Award for Best Film. ... Marina Hands (born January 1977, Paris) is a French stage and film actress. ... The C sar Award for best picture winners: 1976 : Le vieux fusil directed by Robert Enrico 1977 : (Monsieur Klein) directed by Joseph Losey 1978 : Providence directed by Alain Resnais 1979 : Other Peoples Money (Largent des autres) directed by Christian de Chalonge 1980 : Tess (Tess) directed by Roman Polanski...


THEATRE. Not generally known is that Lawrence's novel was successfully dramatized for the stage in a 3-Act play by a young British playwright named John Harte. Although produced at The Arts Theatre in London in 1961 (and elsewhere later on) his play was written in 1953. It was the only D.H.Lawrence novel ever to be staged. And his dramatization was the only one to be read and approved by Lawrence's widow, Frieda. Despite her attempts to obtain the copyright for John Harte to have his play staged in the 1950s, Baron Philippe de Rothschild did not relinquish the dramatic rights until his film was released in France.

 Only the Old Bailey trial against Penguin Books for alleged obscenity in publishing the unexpurgated paperback edition of the novel prevented the play's transfer to the much bigger Wyndham's Theatre, for which it had already been licensed by The Lord Chamberlain's Office on August 12th 1960. It was fully booked out for its limited run at The Arts Theatre and well reviewed by Harold Hobson, the prevailing west end theatre critic of the time. 

References

  1. ^ Hoggart, R. (1961) Introduction to Lady Chatterley's Lover, 2nd Edition; p viii
  2. ^ Ibid.
  3. ^ Lawrence, D.H. Lady Chatterley's Lover 2nd Edition, p7
  4. ^ Hoggart, R. (1961) Introduction to Lady Chatterley's Lover, 2nd Edition; p x

Sources

  • The Trial of Lady Chatterley, C. H. Rolph, ISBN 0-14-013381-X
  • Hoggart, R. Introduction to Lady Chatterley's Lover, 2nd Edition ISBN 0-14-001484-5

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lady Chatterley's Lover at AllExperts (885 words)
Lady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D.
In 2006, this was dramatised by BBC 4 as The Chatterley Affair.
Lady Chatterley's Lover was one of a trio of books (the others being Tropic of Cancer and Fanny Hill), the ban on which was fought and overturned in court by lawyer Charles Rembar.
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