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Encyclopedia > Lady

A lady is a woman who is the counterpart of a lord; or, the counterpart of a gentleman. "Lady" can be used as a title, or as a (formal) form of address for any woman. Diverse women. ... A Lord (Laird in Scottish contexts) is a male who has power and authority. ... The term gentleman (from Latin gentilis, belonging to a race or gens, and man, cognate with the French word gentilhomme, the Spanish gentilhombre, and the Italian gentil uomo or gentiluomo), in its original and strict signification, denoted a man of good family, the Latin generosus (its invariable translation in English... Formal - relating to form. ...

A turn-of-the-century Gibson girl from a U.S. stamp embodies ladylike-ness.
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A turn-of-the-century Gibson girl from a U.S. stamp embodies ladylike-ness.

Contents

Celebrate the Century stamp - Gibson Girl This image is a postage stamp produced by the United States Postal Service after 1978. ... Celebrate the Century stamp - Gibson Girl This image is a postage stamp produced by the United States Postal Service after 1978. ... A USPS stamp depicting a Gibson girl The Gibson Girl was the personification of the feminine ideal as portrayed in the satirical illustrated stories created by illustrator Charles Dana Gibson during the first 15 years of the twentieth century. ...

Etymology and usage

The word comes from Old English hlaifdige; the first part of the word is laif, loaf, bread, as in the corresponding hlaford, lord; the second part is usually taken to be from the root dig-, to knead, seen also in dough; the sense development from bread-kneader, bread-maker, to the ordinary meaning, though not clearly to be traced historically, may be illustrated by that of lord. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ...


The primary meaning of "mistress of a household" is now mostly obsolete, save for the occasional use of old-fashioned phrases such as "lady of the house." This meaning is retained, however, in the title First Lady, used for the wife of an elected president or prime minister. In many cultures in Europe the equivalent term serves as a general title of address equivalent to the English "Mrs" (Gaelic Bean-uasal, French Madame, Spanish Señora, Italian Signora, German Frau) To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States (1861-1865) The majority of this article is about heads of states. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The special use of the word as a title of the Virgin Mary, usually Our Lady, represents the Latin Domina Nostra. In Lady Day and Lady Chapel the word is properly a genitive, representing the hlaefdigan. Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... In the Christian calendar, Lady Day is the Feast of the Annunciation (25 March) and the first of the four traditional Irish Quarter days and English quarter days. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Possessive case. ...

[1]CLICK 4 SHEMALES Download high resolution version (1296x986, 299 KB) John William Waterhouse The Lady of Shallot, 1888 Based on Tennysons poem The Lady of Shallot The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with copyright terms... Download high resolution version (1296x986, 299 KB) John William Waterhouse The Lady of Shallot, 1888 Based on Tennysons poem The Lady of Shallot The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with copyright terms... John William Waterhouse. ... The Lady of Shalott is a romantic poem by the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809–1892). ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ...


In the British peerage

As a title of nobility the uses of "Lady" are mainly paralleled by those of "Lord". It is thus a less formal alternative to the full title giving the specific rank, of marchioness, countess, viscountess or baroness, whether as the title of the husbands rank by right or courtesy, or as the lady's title in her own right. A widow becomes the dowager, e.g. The Dowager Lady Smith. A Marquess is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European monarchies (lacking in some other) and some of their colonies. ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility, especially of France, and of the British peerage, where a viscount ranks above a baron, below an earl (a count in France), and corresponds in Britain to the Anglo-Saxon shire reeve. ... Baroness could refer to: Female equivalent of Baron. ... A dowager is a widow who holds a title or property, or Dower, derived from her deceased husband. ...


In the case of the younger sons of a duke or marquess, who by courtesy have "Lord" prefixed to their given and family name, the wife is known by the husband's given and family name with "Lady" prefixed, e.g. Lady John Smith; the daughters of dukes, marquesses and earls are by courtesy Ladies; here that title is prefixed to the given and family name of the lady, e.g. Lady Jane Smith, and this is preserved if the lady marries a commoner, e.g. Mr John and Lady Jane Smith.


"Lady" is also the customary title of the wife of a baronet or knight; the proper title, now only used in legal documents or on sepulchral monuments, is "Dame"; in the latter case the usage is to prefix "Dame" to the given name of the wife followed by the surname of the husband, thus Dame Jane Smith, but in the former, "Lady" with the surname of the husband only, Sir John and Lady Smith. When a wife divorces a knight and he marries again, the new wife will be Lady Smith while the previous wife becomes Jane, Lady Smith. If he then dies his widow becomes Dowager Lady Smith (no the). During the 15th and 16th centuries princesses or daughters of the blood royal were usually known by their Christian names with "The Lady" prefixed, e.g. The Lady Elizabeth. A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt), is the holder of an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown, known as a baronetcy. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Dame is the female equivalent to Sir for a British knighthood. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Princess is the feminine form of prince (from Latin princeps, meaning principal citizen). ... Members of the British royal family A royal family is the extended family of a monarch. ...


More recent usage: social class

In more recent years, usage of the word lady is even more complicated. Remarks made by the journalist William Allen White in his 1946 autobiography indicate part of the difficulties. White relates that a woman who had paid a fine for prostitution came to his newspaper to protest, not that the fact of her conviction was reported, but that the newspaper referred to her as a "woman" rather than a "lady." Since that incident, White assured his readers that his papers referred to human females as "women," with the exception of police court characters, who are all "ladies." Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ... William Allen White Born in Emporia, Kansas, on February 10, 1868, William Allen White was a nationally known newspaper editor for much of his life. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ... A fine is money paid as a financial punishment for the commission of minor crimes or as the settlement of a claim. ... Whore redirects here. ... A Justice of the Peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ...


White's anecdote touches on a phenomenon that others have remarked on as well. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, in a difference reminiscent of Nancy Mitford's U vs. non-U distinction, lower class women strongly preferred to be called "ladies" while women from higher backgrounds were content to be identified as "women." Alfred Ayers remarked in 1881 that upper middle class female store clerks in his day were content to be "saleswomen," while lower class female store clerks, for whom their job represented a social advancement, indignantly insisted on being called "salesladies." Something of this sense may also be underneath Kipling's lines: Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... Nancy Mitford, 1957 The Hon. ... U and non-U English usage, with U standing for upper class, and non-U representing the rest, were part of the terminology of popular discourse of social dialects (sociolects) in 1950s Britain and the northeast United States. ... A social class is, at its most basic, a group of people that have similar social status. ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India, and best known today for his childrens books, including The Jungle Book (1894), The Second Jungle Book (1895), Just So Stories (1902), and Puck of Pooks Hill (1906); his novel...

The Colonel's lady and Rosie O'Grady —
Sisters under the skin

These social class issues, while no longer on the front burner in the twenty-first century, have imbued the formal use of "lady" with something of an odour of irony. (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2001-2100. ... Irony is a literary or rhetorical device in which there is a gap or incongruity between what a speaker or a writer says, and what is generally understood (either at the time, or in the later context of history). ...


It remains in use colloquially; for example, as a counterpart to "gentleman," in the phrase "ladies and gentlemen," and is generally interchangeable (in a strictly informal sense) with "woman." (e.g., "The lady at the store said I could return this item in thirty days.") A colloquialism is an informal expression, that is, an expression not used in formal speech or writing. ... The term gentleman (from Latin gentilis, belonging to a race or gens, and man, cognate with the French word gentilhomme, the Spanish gentilhombre, and the Italian gentil uomo or gentiluomo), in its original and strict signification, denoted a man of good family, the Latin generosus (its invariable translation in English...


More recent usage: sexism (US)

Non-sexist language guidelines forbid its use to refer attributively to the sex of a working person, as in lady lawyer and lady doctor. Many find these to have a condescending nuance not shared by female lawyer or woman doctor ; compare poetess for a similar problem. Gender-neutral language (gender-generic, gender-inclusive, non-sexist, or sex-neutral language) is language that attempts to refer neither to males nor females when discussing an abstract or hypothetical person whose sex cannot otherwise be determined, as opposed to more traditional language forms, which may use male or female... A poetess, in the simplest sense, is a woman poet. ...


Some advocates of non-sexist language recommend not using the word at all, whereas others permit its parallel use in the same circumstances in which a man would be called a gentleman or lord (for example, titling washrooms Men and Ladies would be considered sexist, but using either Men and Women or Ladies and Gentlemen would be acceptable; as is landlady as the parallel of landlord.)


In the United States, notably among younger feminists of the 1990s and 00s influenced by riot grrl, "lady" has occasionally been reclaimed in a more ironic fashion. For example, Miranda July's Joanie 4 Jackie chain letter videotape project is said to consist of "lady-made movies," a feminist music and video distributor in North Carolina called itself Mr. Lady Records, and chorus of Le Tigre's song "LT Tour Theme" from the album Feminist Sweepstakes (2000) declares itself to be written "for the ladies and the fags." Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Germans dancing on the Berlin Wall in late 1989, the symbol of the cold war divide falls down as the world unites in the 1990s. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Riot grrl (also frequently spelled riot grrrl) is a form of hardcore punk rock music, known for its militant feminist stance. ... Irony is a literary or rhetorical device in which there is a gap or incongruity between what a speaker or a writer says, and what is generally understood (either at the time, or in the later context of history). ... Miranda July Miranda July (born February 1, 1974) is a performance artist, musician, writer, and film director. ... A typical chain letter consists of a message that attempts to induce the recipient to make a number of copies of the letter and then pass them on to one or more new recipients. ... Bottom view of VHS videotape cassette with magnetic tape exposed Videotape is a means of recording television pictures and accompanying sound onto magnetic tape as opposed to movie film. ... Distributor cap. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... Mr. ... Le Tigre (album) Le Tigre (shirt) Le Tigre is a feminist electro post-punk band formed in 1998 by Kathleen Hanna. ...


Lady as a title

The term, "Lady", may also be used as a proper title, opposite a "Lord". The use of the word is somewhat exinct, nowadays.


Famous Ladies...

  • Lady Diana Spencer

Fictional Ladies...

The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde, a comedy of manners in either three or four acts (depending on edition) inspired by W. S. Gilberts Engaged. ... Lady Cassandra is a fictional character from the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... This article is becoming very long. ... New Earth is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who which was first broadcast on April 15, 2006. ... Lady Chatterleys Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence written in 1928. ... Tim Burtons Corpse Bride is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated stop-motion-animation film based loosely on a 19th century Russian-Jewish folktale version of an older Jewish story and set in a fictional Victorian era England. ... Lady Jessica Atreides, portrayed by Saskia Reeves in the Dune miniseries Jessica Atreides is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Emblem of House Atreides from Emperor: Battle for Dune For the novel of the same name, see Dune: House Atreides. ... Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley National Park In physical geography, a dune is a hill of sand built by eolian processes. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), also known as Dame Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ...

Kenny Rogers sings "Lady"

Love song This article is about the general concept. ...


"Lady" is also the title of a 1980 chart topper by Kenny Rogers. It reached #1 in the US pop charts for 6 weeks and #12 in the UK. It was written by Rogers friend, Lionel Richie (who also did the song himself). The song appeared on Rogers' 1980 "Greatest Hits" album, which also reached Number 1 in the United States and sold over 30 million copies world-wide. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Kenneth Donald Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. ...


References

  • Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage (Merriam-Webster, 1989), ISBN 0-87779-132-5.

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lady Jane Glass Display Cases (343 words)
Lady Jane produces museum quality objects d’art in the form of glass display cases, miniature greenhouses, and miniature conservatories.
On the following pages you will view some of the outstanding one-of-a-kind display cases of Lady Jane which are now in Private Collections or Museums, as well as many of her standard dislay cases that she has decorated for display.
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