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Encyclopedia > Lacrosse
Lacrosse being played in Finland

Lacrosse is a full contact team sport played using a small, solid, 8-ounce rubber ball and stick comprised of a plastic head and a metal or wood shaft. The head has a loose net of mesh strung into it and alows the player to catch and cradle the ball. Offensively the object of the game is to use the stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball in an effort to score by ultimately throwing the ball into an opponents goal. Defensively the object is to keep the opposing team from scoring and to dispossess them of the ball through the use of stick checking and body contact. There are two main versions of the game; outdoor or field lacrosse and indoor or box lacrosse. The two versions of the sport differ in that field lacrosse is played with ten players to a side on a field roughly the size of a soccer pitch while box lacrosse is played with six players per side in an enclosure similar to that of an ice hockey rink. Lacrosse may refer to one of the following: Lacrosse (sport), a team sport Lacrosse (satellite), a National Reconnaissance Office reconnaissance satellite. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2562x1235, 1544 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lacrosse Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2562x1235, 1544 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lacrosse Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Womens Australian rules football is a team sport. ...

Contents

History of lacrosse

Main article: History of lacrosse

Lacrosse originated among the Native American tribes of northeastern North America. Some of its traditional names (and literal translations) are; dehuntshigwa'es (Onondaga for "men hit a rounded object"), da-nah-wah'uwsdi (Eastern Cherokee for "little war"), Tewaarathon (Mohawk language for "little brother of war"), and baaga`adowe (Ojibwe for "bump hips").[1] An Indian Ball-Play by George Catlin, circa 1846-1850. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... Onondaga (Onundagaono or People of the Hills) is the language of the Onondaga First Nation, one of the original five constituent tribes of the League of the Iroquois (Hodenosaunee) This language is spoken in the United States and Canada, primarily on reservations in western New York state, and near Brantford... Original distribution of the Cherokee language Cherokee (; Tsalagi) is an Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee people which uses a unique syllabary writing system. ... Mohawk is a Native American language spoken by the Mohawk nation in the United States and Canada. ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ...


The game was named lacrosse by French missionaries. It has often been assumed that the name lacrosse stems from the resemblance that a traditional wooden lacrosse stick bears to a bishop's crosier. Jesuit missionary Jean-de-Brébeuf noted this resemblance in the Relation des Jésuites around 1640. However, the word crosse in the French of that time period was a general term used for any type of staff. The name lacrosse is simply a reflection of this and is perhaps shorthand for the phrase "le jeu de la crosse" (the game of the hooked stick).[2] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286 A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and some Lutheran prelates. ...


In Native American society lacrosse served several different purposes. The sport was used for conflict resolution, the training of young warriors and as a religious ritual. Games could be played on a pitch over a mile wide and sometimes lasted for days. Early balls were made out of deerskin, clay, stone, and sometimes wood. Lacrosse has played a significant role in the community and religious life of tribes across the continent for many years. Early lacrosse was characterized by deep spiritual involvement, befitting the spirit of combat in which it was undertaken. Those who took part did so in the role of warriors, with the goal of bringing glory and honor to themselves and their tribes.[3] The game was said to be played "for the pleasure of the Creator."

"Ball-play of the Choctaw--ball up" by George Catlin, circa 1834-1835.
"Ball-play of the Choctaw--ball up" by George Catlin, circa 1834-1835.

Lacrosse has witnessed significant modifications since its origins in the 15th century, but many aspects of the sport remain the same. In the Native North American version, each team consisted of about 100 to 1,000 men on a field that stretched from about 500 yards to a couple of miles long.[4] These lacrosse games lasted from sunup to sundown for two to three days. These games were played to settle inter-tribal disputes, to toughen young warriors in preparation for future combat and to give thanks to the Creator. The Alqonquin tribes referred to the sport as "baggatway".[4] The game became known to Westerners when a French Jesuit Missionary, Jean de Brébeuf, saw the Iroquois Natives play it in 1636.[5] George Catlins 1800s painting of Choctaws playing the little brother of war. ... George Catlins 1800s painting of Choctaws playing the little brother of war. ... George Catlin (1796 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania – December 23, 1872 in Jersey City, New Jersey) was an American painter who specialized in portraits of Native Americans in the Old West. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Saint Jean de Brébeuf (25 March 1593 – 16 March 1649) was a Jesuit missionary, martyred in Canada March 16 1649. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Richmond Hill "Young Canadians" lacrosse team, 1885.
Richmond Hill "Young Canadians" lacrosse team, 1885.

In 1856, Dr. William George Beers, a Canadian dentist, founded Montreal Lacrosse Club and in 1867 he codified the game, shortening the length of each game and reducing the number of players to ten per team.[4] The first game played under Beers' rules was at Upper Canada College in 1867, with Upper Canada College losing to the Toronto Cricket Club by a score of 3–1. By the 1900s, high schools, colleges, and universities began playing the game, and lacrosse was contested as a medal sport in the 1928 and 1932 Olympics. Modern women's lacrosse was started at St Leonards School in Scotland in 1890. It was introduced by the school's headmistress Louisa Lumsden.[6] Image File history File links From_rattlesnake_hunt_to_hockey_page_121_cropped. ... Image File history File links From_rattlesnake_hunt_to_hockey_page_121_cropped. ... Motto: En la rose, je fleuris (French for Like the rose, I flourish) Map showing Richmond Hills location in York Region Country Canada Province Ontario Region York Region Incorporated 1873 Government  - Mayor Dave Barrow  - Governing Body Richmond Hill Town Council  - MPs Lui Temelkovski, Bryon Wilfert Population (2006)[1]  - City... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... X-rays can reveal if a person has cavities Dentistry is the practical application of knowledge of dental science (the science of placement, arrangement, function of teeth) to human beings. ... Montreal Lacrosse Club was a lacrosse club in the Canadian city of Montreal, Quebec. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Upper Canada College (UCC) is a private elementary and secondary school for boys in downtown Toronto, Canada. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... St Leonards School and Sixth Form College is an independent boarding and day school located in St Andrews, Fife, on the east coast of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Dame Louisa Innes Lumsden, DBE (1840 - 1935) was a lecturer in classics at Girton College and the first Headmistress of St Leonards, Fife. ...


In the United States, lacrosse had been primarily been a regional sport centered in and around New England and the Mid-Atlantic States. In recent years however, its popularity has started to spread south to Georgia and Florida, as well as west to Colorado, California, Texas, and the Midwest, spurred by the sport's increasing visibility in the media, the growth of college, high school, and youth (or "pee wee") programs throughout the country. The NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship is the most attended NCAA Championship, outdrawing the Final Four of men's basketball.[7] The growth of lacrosse was also facilitated by the introduction of plastic heads in the 1970s by Baltimore-based STX. This innovation reduced the weight and cost of the lacrosse stick, and allowed for faster passes and game play than traditional wooden sticks. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... STX can be: The Danish Gymnasium examination STX Corporation, a Koreas shipyard company. ...


Up until the 1930s all lacrosse was played on large fields outdoors. Around this time the owners of Canadian hockey arenas invented a reduced version of the game, called box lacrosse, as a means to make more profit from their arena investments. Through this commercialization, in a short period of time, box lacrosse became the dominant form of the sport in Canada. More recently field lacrosse has witnessed a revival in Canada as the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association began operating a collegiate men's league in 1985 that now includes 12 varsity teams. The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... Victoria Shamrocks vs Peterborough Lakers, Mann Cup 2005. ...


In 1987 a professional box lacrosse league was started called the Eagle Pro Box Lacrosse League. Eventually this league would change its name to the National Lacrosse League and grow to encompass lacrosse clubs in twelve cities scattered throughout the United States and Canada. In the summer of 2001 a professional field lacrosse league known as Major League Lacrosse (MLL) was inaugurated. Initially starting with six teams the MLL has grown to a total of ten clubs located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. In July of 2007 Major League Lacrosse set the professional lacrosse attendance record when nearly 20,000 fans attended a game at Invesco Field in Denver, Colorado. Victoria Shamrocks vs Peterborough Lakers, Mann Cup 2005. ... NLL redirects here. ... Major League Lacrosse is a professional outdoor Lacrosse league that is made up of teams within the United States. ... West entrance of INVESCO Field at Mile High INVESCO Field at Mile High is a sporting event and events stadium in Denver, Colorado. ...


Rules

Outdoor men's lacrosse involves two teams, each competing to project a small ball of solid rubber into the opposing team's goal. Each team starts with ten players on the field: a goalkeeper or "goalie" who stays inside the crease; three defenders in the defensive end; three midfielders free to roam the whole field; and three attackers attempting to score goals in the offensive end. A yellow lacrosse ball. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...

A face-off
A face-off

Each quarter starts with a “face-off” in which the ball is placed on the ground and two “face-off-men” lay their stick horizontally next to the ball, head of the stick inches from the ball and the butt-end pointing down the midfield line.[8] Face-off-men scrap for the ball, often by “clamping” it under their stick and flicking it out to their midfielders, who start on the wing restraining line near the sideline and sprint in when the whistle is blown to start play. Attackers and defenders cannot cross their “restraining line” until one player from the midfield takes possession of the ball.[8] A face-off also restarts the game after each goal. Featured on the left, Castor Troy (played by Nicholas Cage) faces off againt Sean Archer in the John Woo film; Face/Off File links The following pages link to this file: Castor Troy ... Featured on the left, Castor Troy (played by Nicholas Cage) faces off againt Sean Archer in the John Woo film; Face/Off File links The following pages link to this file: Castor Troy ...


Players scoop the ball off the ground with their stick and may run carrying the ball in their stick, pass the ball through the air to other players, or throw it at the goal. In men's lacrosse, players may kick the ball, as well as cover it with their sticks, provided they do not withhold it from play.


Time continues to run in dead ball situations such as in between goals, with two exceptions: when the referees deem it necessary to avoid a significant loss of playing time, for example when chasing a ball shot far away or during care of an injured player; and in the last three minutes of the fourth quarter of any men’s game.[9]


Play is quite fast and fluent with typical games totaling ten to twenty goals.


Playing Field and Equipment measurments

Diagram of a men's lacrosse field.
Diagram of a men's lacrosse field.

The field of play is 110 yards (100 m) long and 60 yards (54 m) wide.[8] The goals are 6 feet (1.8 m) by 6 feet, containing a mesh netting similar to an ice hockey goal. The goal sits inside a circular "crease", measuring 18 feet (5.5 m) in diameter.[8] Behind the crease is the area designated simply as "X".One Attackman will remain at "X" in most types of offensive setups, such as chasing after a shot in which the first player to the spot where the ball went out gets possession of the ball. Image File history File links Mens_lacrosse_diagram. ... Image File history File links Mens_lacrosse_diagram. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...


Each player carries a lacrosse stick measuring between 40 inches (101.6 centimeters) and 42 inches (106.68 centimeters) long (a "short crosse"), or 52 inches (132.08 centimeters) to 72 (182.88 centimeters) long (a "long crosse").[8] The designated goalkeeper is allowed to have a stick from 40 inches (101.6 centimeters) to 72 inches (182.88 centimeters) long. The head of the crosse on both long and short crosses must be 6.5 inches or larger at its widest point and 2.5 inches wide wider at its narrowest point.[8] A lacrosse stick (sometimes called a crosse) is a lacrosse players most important piece of equipment. ...

A men's lacrosse stick head
A men's lacrosse stick head

The head of a goalkeeper's crosse may measure up to 15 inches (38.1 centimeters) wide, significantly larger than field players' heads to assist in blocking shots.[8] Goalies at the youth levels commonly use shorter crosses. Although most attackmen and midfielders utilize short crosses, defensemen carry long crosses, and one midfielder on defense may carry a long crosse.[8] Some teams choose to distribute their sticks differently, not uncommon because a team may only have 4 long crosses on the field during live play, excluding penalty boxes. Most modern sticks have a metal shaft, usually made of aluminum,titanium or alloys while the head is made of hard plastic. Metal shafts must have a plastic or a more popular rubber cap (or "butt") at the end. The heads are strung with string, leather, and mesh. The strings in the "pocket" are called shooting strings and accuracy or "v" strings. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Lacrosse players must wear helmets (or eye protection for women) and gloves and also typically wear shoulder and elbow pads and sometimes they wear rib pads.[9] Athletic supporters and protective cups for all players are also strongly recommended and often required.[10] A lacrosse glove is one of the two protective gloves worn by mens lacrosse players. ... A jockstrap, also known as a jock or athletic supporter, is a type of mens undergarment designed for use in sports or other activities, such as during the recovery from a vasectomy, although some men just like to wear them. ...


Positions

Attackmen

There are six Attackmen on the field at one time, three for each team. The Attackmen use "short-sticks"(40 inches). Attackmen must demonstrate good stick-handling with both hands. Attackmen must be able to handle the pressure of the opposing defenseman which are equipped with long sticks. Depending on the defensive scheme of the opposing team they are also the players who score most of the goals. An attackman must have a good sense of what is going on around him and where his teammates are at all times. The attackmen are also responsible for setting up in fast or slow break formation when a "middie" or clearing defenseman has a breakaway. This generally looks like an "L" with two at goal line extended (GLE) and one up towards the midfield away from the "middie" coming down. "Riding" takes place when the ball is turned over on the offensive end and the Attackmen are forced to defend the other teams defense from "Clearing" the ball to the fields opposite end.[11]


Midfielder

Commonly referred to as "middies" six Midfielders are allowed on the field at once, three for each team. They are allowed to travel anywhere on the field as they play both offense and defense. There are two types of Midfielders, the defensive and offensive. The two can rotate by running off the sidelines. The Midfielders are allowed to use short-sticks and up to one long-pole. While on offense three short-sticks are generally used for their superior stick-handling. While on defense two short-sticks are used with one long-pole. Some teams have a designated face-off middie (fogo-face off get off) that takes the majority of face-offs and is usually quickly substituted after the face-off is complete.


Defensemen

In the men's game defensive players are allowed to use "long poles"(which are six feet long), while in women's lacrosse defensive players use the same type of stick as the other players on the field. The Defensemen uses his stick to throw checks and try to dislodge the ball. The "long-poles" may also play mid-field as a strategic defender, a.k.a. a Long-stick middie (LSM). Teams usually use this to anticipate losing the face-off and be stronger on defense. There are three Defensemen per team and one long stick midfielder allowed on the field at a time in NCAA and High School competition.


Goalkeeper

Main article: Goalkeeper (field lacrosse)

The goalkeeper's job is to prevent the ball from getting into the goal. Goalies also direct the team defense. Goalies need to be tough both physically and mentally. Also the Goalie needs to be the loudest player on the field calling the position of the ball at all times so the defense can concentrate on the man they are covering instead of where the ball is. The Goalie needs to be able to keep his composure on the field while enduring shots that are capable of reaching over 100 MPH.


Box lacrosse

National Lacrosse League game
Main article: Box lacrosse

Canadians most commonly play box lacrosse, an indoor version of the game played by teams of six on ice hockey rinks where the ice has been removed or covered by artificial turf. The enclosed playing area is called a box, in contrast to the open playing field of the traditional game.[12] This version of the game was introduced in the 1930s to promote business for hockey arenas, and within a several years had nearly supplanted field lacrosse in Canada. Victoria Shamrocks vs Peterborough Lakers, Mann Cup 2005. ... Victoria Shamrocks vs Peterborough Lakers, Mann Cup 2005. ...


In box lacrosse the goal is smaller (4' X 4'9")[12] than in outdoor lacrosse, and the goaltender wears much more protective padding.[12] There is a shot clock and the attacking team must take a shot on goal within 30 seconds of gaining possession of the ball. Cross-checking is legal in box lacrosse in contrast to the field game where it is considered a penalty. [12]


Indoor lacrosse is a version of box lacrosse played by the National Lacrosse League, which employs slight rule changes from the traditional box game. Notably, the games are played during the winter,[12] not only in regions where summer lacrosse is popular but also in regions where lacrosse is rarely played in summer. This version of the game was intended to be less violent than box lacrosse, although changes in box lacrosse rules have reduced some of its violent play and a change in indoor lacrosse rules to permit cross-checking (hitting another player with the stick with one's hands apart on the shaft) have made it more violent. The chief differences between the two forms of the indoor game now are that indoor lacrosse games consist of 4 x 15 minute quarters compared with 3 x 20 minute periods in box lacrosse, and that indoor lacrosse players may use only sticks with hollow shafts, while box lacrosse permits solid wooden sticks.[13] Indoor lacrosse is always played on artificial turf (sometimes called "carpet"), while box lacrosse is usually played on bare concrete.[12] NLL redirects here. ...


Women's lacrosse

Main article: Women's lacrosse

The rules of women's lacrosse differ significantly from men's lacrosse, most notably by equipment and the degree of allowable physical contact.[14] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NCAA women Lacrosse champions. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... The Northwestern Wildcats are the athletic teams that represent Northwestern University, a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, and the only private university member. ... A womens lacrosse player carries the ball past a defender. ...


The first modern women's lacrosse game was held at St Leonards School in Scotland in 1890. It was introduced by the school's headmistress Louisa Lumsden.[6] The first women's lacrosse team in the United States was established at Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore, Maryland. Men’s and women’s lacrosse were played under virtually the same rules, with no protective equipment, until the mid-1930s. St Leonards School and Sixth Form College is an independent boarding and day school located in St Andrews, Fife, on the east coast of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Dame Louisa Innes Lumsden, DBE (1840 - 1935) was a lecturer in classics at Girton College and the first Headmistress of St Leonards, Fife. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


NCAA women's Lacrosse Division I began play in 1982. The University of Maryland, College Park has traditionally dominated the women's intercollegiate play, producing many head coaches across the country and many U.S. national team players. The Lady Terps won seven consecutive NCAA championships, from 1995 through 2001. Princeton University's women's teams have made it to the final game seven times since 1993 and have won three NCAA titles, in 1994, 2002, and 2003. The University of Virginia has played in the championship game nine times since 1991, collecting titles in 1991, 1993 and 2004. In recent years, Northwestern University has become a force, winning the national championship in 2005, 2006, and 2007. NCAA redirects here. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ... NCAA women Lacrosse champions. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ...


Internationally, the game is commonly played in British girls' independent schools, and while only a minor sport in Australia, it is played to a very high standard at the elite level, where its national squad won the 2005 Women's Lacrosse World Cup. The next Women's World Cup will be played in 2009 hosted by Prague, Czech Republic. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... The Womens Lacrosse World Cup is sponsored by the International Federation of Womens Lacrosse Associations every 4 years. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ...


International lacrosse

Lacrosse has been played for the most part in Canada and the United States, with small but dedicated lacrosse communities in Great Britain and Australia. Recently, however, lacrosse has begun to flourish at an international level with the sport establishing itself in many new and far-reaching countries, particularly in Europe and east Asia.


With lacrosse not having been an official Olympic sport since 1908, the pinnacle of international lacrosse competition consists of the quadrennial World Championships. Currently, there are world championships for lacrosse at senior men, senior women, under 19 men and under 19 women level. Until 1986, lacrosse world championships had only been contested by the United States, Canada, England and Australia, with Scotland and Wales also competing in the women's edition. The expansion of the game internationally saw the 2005 Women's World Cup competed for by ten nations, and the 2006 Men's World Championship was contested by 21 countries. A large number of sports have been conducted at the Olympic Games. ... The International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) World Championship began as a four-team invitational tournament that coincided with Canadas centennial lacrosse celebration in 1967. ... The International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) World Championship began as a four-team invitational tournament that coincided with Canadas centennial lacrosse celebration in 1967. ... The Womens Lacrosse World Cup is sponsored by the International Federation of Womens Lacrosse Associations every 4 years. ... The Under-19 World Lacrosse Championships (U-19s) are held separately for men and women about every 4 years to find the world champions for the under-19 age group in lacrosse. ... The Under-19 World Lacrosse Championships (U-19s) are held separately for men and women about every 4 years to find the world champions for the under-19 age group in lacrosse. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... The 2006 Warrior World Lacrosse Championship, held in London, Ontario from 13–22 July 2006, was won by Team Canada and featured a record twenty-one competing nations. ...


In 2003, the first World Indoor Lacrosse Championship was contested by six nations at four sites in Ontario, Canada. Canada won the championship in a final game against the Iroqouis, 21-4. The 2007 WILC was held in Halifax, Canada on from May 14-20. Teams from Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, England, Ireland, Iroquois Nationals, Scotland and the United States competed. The inaugural World Indoor Lacrosse Championship was held in Hamilton, Kitchener, Mississauga, and Oshawa, Ontario, Canada in May 2003. ...


The next largest international field lacrosse competition is the European Lacrosse Championships. Held for both men and women, the European Lacrosse Federation (ELF) has been running the European Championships since 1995. Before 2001 the Championships were an annual event, but in 2001 the ELF changed the format to every four years between the World Championship. Before 2004, only 7 nations had ever participated, but in 2004 there was a record number of participating countries, with 12 men's and 6 women's, which made it the largest international lacrosse event of 2004. The next European Lacrosse Championships will be held in Lahti, Finland in 2008. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The "Dive Shot"
The "Dive Shot"

The World Lacrosse Championships have been dominated by the United States, particularly in the men's game, where the only world championship game losses at either level was in the 1978 final to Canada and 2006 final to Canada. The USA has won 8 of the 10 senior men's and all five under 19 men's tournaments to date. In the women's game, Australia have provided stiffer competition, even holding a winning record against the USA of 6 wins to 5 at senior world championships, plus one draw. Despite this, the USA has won 5 of the 7 senior women's and 2 of the 3 under 19 women's tournaments to date, with the other world championships won by Australia, including the 2005 senior women's trophy. Image File history File linksMetadata 7473b. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 7473b. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The 2006 Warrior World Lacrosse Championship, held in London, Ontario from 13–22 July 2006, was won by Team Canada and featured a record twenty-one competing nations. ...


The Iroquois Nationals are a team consisting of members of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. The team was admitted to the International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) in 1990. It is the only Native American team sanctioned to compete in any sport internationally. The Nationals placed fourth in the 1998, 2002 and 2006 World Lacrosse Championships. The Iroquois Nationals are a lacrosse team consisting of members of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the League of Peace and Power) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... International Lacrosse Federation was founded in 1974 to promote and develop the game of lacrosse throughout the world. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... The International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) World Championship began as a four-team invitational tournament that coincided with Canadas centennial lacrosse celebration in 1967. ...


Governing bodies

For other uses, see World (disambiguation). ... International Lacrosse Federation was founded in 1974 to promote and develop the game of lacrosse throughout the world. ... The International Federation of Womens Lacrosse Associations (IFWLA) was formed in 1972 to promote and develop the game of Womens lacrosse throughout the world. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The English Lacrosse Association (ELA) is the governing body for lacrosse in England. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... Lacrosse is a team sport in which opposing teams use a netted stick, officially known as a crosse, to direct the game ball towards the opponents goal. ... North American redirects here. ... The Canadian Lacrosse Association (lAssociation canadienne de crosse), founded in 1925, is the governing body of lacrosse in Canada. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the League of Peace and Power) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... US Lacrosse was founded on January 1, 1998, as the national governing body of mens and womens lacrosse in the United States. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Lacrosse

An Indian Ball-Play by George Catlin, circa 1846-1850. ... Victoria Shamrocks vs Peterborough Lakers, Mann Cup 2005. ... Intercrosse is a non-contact form of lacrosse with a standardised set of rules using sofcrosse equipment. ... A womens lacrosse player carries the ball past a defender. ... A lacrosse stick (sometimes called a crosse) is a lacrosse players most important piece of equipment. ... A yellow lacrosse ball. ... The crest of the OLRA is worn by Board Members on the front left chest area of the officials jersey. ...

References

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
National Sports of Canada Act
  1. ^ Freelang Ojibwe Dictionary. Retrieved on 2007-03-30.
  2. ^ Lacrosse entry. Compact Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  3. ^ Rock, Tom. "More Than a Game", Lacrosse Magazine, US Lacrosse, November/December 2002. Retrieved on 2007-03-18. 
  4. ^ a b c Lacrosse History. STX. Retrieved on 2007-02-24.
  5. ^ Patron Saints Index: Jean de Brébeuf. Catholic Community Forum. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  6. ^ a b History of Lacrosse at St Leonards. STLeonards-Fife.org. Retrieved on 2008-05-01.
  7. ^ "Virginia Claims National Title, and a Victory for Lacrosse", The New York Times, May 30, 2006. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Men's Lacrosse Rules Condensed Version. National Collegiate Athletic Association.
  9. ^ a b Rules of Men's Field Larosse. International Lacrosse Federation. Retrieved on 2007-03-30.
  10. ^ Men's Lacrosse Rules. US Lacrosse. Retrieved on 2007-07-30.
  11. ^ Laxicon
  12. ^ a b c d e f Lax 101. National Lacrosse League. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  13. ^ National Lacrosse League: Official Rules. National Lacrosse League. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  14. ^ 2007 IWWLA Women's Lacrosse Rules, International Federation of Women's Lacrosse Associations

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... US Lacrosse was founded on January 1, 1998, as the national governing body of mens and womens lacrosse in the United States. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... December 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → // Events December 31, 2002 United States troops get into a brief gun battle with paramilitary forces of the Warzirstan Scouts of Pakistan, in a remote tribal area along the undefined Afghan/Pakistani border, in Paktia Province... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... STX can be: The Danish Gymnasium examination STX Corporation, a Koreas shipyard company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... NCAA redirects here. ... International Lacrosse Federation was founded in 1974 to promote and develop the game of lacrosse throughout the world. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... US Lacrosse was founded on January 1, 1998, as the national governing body of mens and womens lacrosse in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NLL redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NLL redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • LAXnews - College Lacrosse Rankings, Articles, Videos & Photos.
  • CBC Digital Archives - Lacrosse: A History of Canada's Game
  • The Official Magazine of the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association
  • Inside Lacrosse: Magazine, Website and TV show for the world of lacrosse.
  • Most Basic Lacrosse Rules

Further reading

  • Inside Lacrosse (2003). Lacrosse: North America's Game. Baltimore, Maryland [(Inside Lacrosse)] Press. ISBN 0-9759834-0-7
  • Fisher, Donald M (2002). Lacrosse: A History of the Game. Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-6938-2
  • Scott, Bob (1978). Lacrosse: Technique and Tradition. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-2060-X
  • Vennum, Thomas Jr. "Lacrosse". Encyclopedia of North American Indians.
  • Cramer, James. Lacrosse Equipment. Information on Lacrosse Equipment for Men and Women.
  • Fink, Noah & Melissa Gaskill. Lacrosse for Parents, Lacrosse: A Guide for Parents and Players.

The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Womens Australian rules football is a team sport. ... A sport governing body comes in several forms. ... There are a variety of articles listing people of a particular sport. ... A National sport is a sport which has been declared to be the sport of a nation by its government such as Lacrosse and ice hockey in Canada. ... This article is about the sport. ... A korfball match in the Netherlands between Trekvogels and OZC Korfball (Dutch: Korfbal) is a team ball game, similar in many ways to mixed netball. ... A netball game in Australia Netball is a non-contact generally indoor sport similar to, and derived from, basketball. ... Game of Buzkashi in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan Buzkashi, Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis (Persian: بزکشی buzkashī: goat grabbing) (Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen: kökbörü, kök blue + börü wolf, Kazakh: көкпар, Kyrgyz: улак) is a traditional Central Asian team sport played on horseback. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Beach handball is a team sport where two teams pass and bounce a ball trying to throw it in the goal of the opposing team. ... Dimensions of a field of field handball played with 11 players at 1936 summer olympics compared to a football field. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ... Kabaddi (sometimes written Kabbadi or Kabadi) (Telugu: , Punjabi: , Marathi: , Hindi: ,Urdu: ; IPA: ) is a team sport originally from the Indian subcontinent. ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... Cycle Polo or Bike Polo or Bicycle polo is an outdoor game similar to Polo, except that bicycles are used instead of horses. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Fistball is a very old sport which continues to be practiced all over the world: in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia. ... A child demonstrating sepak takraw. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... Beach Soccer is a variant of the sport of association football. ... Futsal in Germany Futsal is an indoor version of football (soccer). ... An indoor soccer game in Mexico. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... Diagram of a Canadian football field. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Bold text // Rugby sevens being played at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, which was held at Melbournes Telstra Dome. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A game of broomball begins with a face-off Broomball is a popular recreational ice sport originating in Canada and played around the world. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... A floorball match between Sweden (yellow) and Finland (white) Floorball is a gay indoor team sport played using composite or carbon sticks with a plastic vented blade where the aim is to put a light plastic ball into the opponents goal. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Indoor field hockey is an indoor variant of traditional outdoor field hockey. ... Ringette is a team sport played on an ice surface. ... Roller Hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using skates with wheels. ... Inline hockey is a variation of roller hockey very similar to ice hockey, from which it is derived. ... Rink hockey - Hardball hockey - Hoquei em Patins Roller Hockey (Quad) is highly popular and has many names worldwide that mean the same sport. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Adults playing kickball. ... Lapta (Russian: ) is a Russian ball game, similar to baseball. ... Oina is a Romanian sport, similar in some ways to the American baseball. ... Over-the-line is a game related to baseball and softball. ... Girls playing pesäpallo in Siilinjärvi Pesäpallo (Swedish: Boboll, also referred to as Finnish baseball) is a fast-moving ball sport thats quite often referred to as the national sport of Finland and has some presence in other countries, such as Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia, and Northern... For the movie, see Rounders (film). ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... Stool ball is a historical ball game, originating in southern England, where variants are still played in some schools. ...


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