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Encyclopedia > Lachlan Macquarie
Major General Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales
Major General Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales

Major-General Lachlan Macquarie CB (31 January 1762[1]1 July 1824), British military officer and colonial administrator, served as Governor of New South Wales from 1810 to 1821 and had a leading role in the social, economic and architectural development of that colony. Historians assess his influence on the transition of New South Wales from a penal colony to a free settlement as being crucial to the shaping of Australian society. Download high resolution version (635x772, 443 KB)Illustration from Volume I of The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia by Andrew Garran, 1888 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (635x772, 443 KB)Illustration from Volume I of The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia by Andrew Garran, 1888 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) Ribbon of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... List of Governors of New South Wales See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Early life and career

Lachlan Macquarie was born on the island of Ulva off the coast of the Isle of Mull in the Inner Hebrides, a chain of islands off the West Coast of Scotland. He joined the 84th Regiment of Foot in 1776 and served in North America, India and Egypt. Macquarie became a Freemason in January 1793 at Bombay, India, in Lodge No. 1 (No. 139 on the register of the English "Moderns" Grand Lodge). He was promoted captain in 1789, major in 1801, and lieutenant-colonel, commanding the 73rd Regiment of Foot, in 1805. In April 1809 he was appointed Governor of New South Wales. He was given a mandate to restore government and discipline in the colony following the Rum Rebellion against Governor William Bligh. The British government decided to reverse its practice of appointing naval officers as Governor and chose an army commander in the hope that he could secure the co-operation of the unruly New South Wales Corps. He was promoted colonel in 1810, brigadier in 1811 and major-general in 1813, while serving as governor. Ulva is a privately owned island in the Scottish Inner Hebrides, off the west coast of Mull. ... Tobermory with 700 people, the largest settlement on Mull, is home to the only whisky distillery on the island. ... The Hebrides (Inner Hebrides in red) The Inner Hebrides are a group of islands off the west coast of Scotland, to the south east of the Outer Hebrides. ... This article is about the country. ... The 84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants) began as a regiment of the Provincial Establishment (military units made up of Colonial citizens of the British Empire, raised during the American Revolution. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... ... The 73rd Regiment of Foot also known as MacLeods Highlanders after its founder Lord MacLeod, was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... A contemporary propaganda cartoon of Blighs arrest produced to show Bligh as being a coward The Rum Rebellion of 1808 was the only successful (if only temporarily so) armed takeover of government in Australias recorded history. ... William Bligh in 1814 Vice-Admiral William Bligh FRS RN (9 September 1754 – 7 December 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and colonial administrator. ... The New South Wales Corps (also known as the Rum Corps and the Botany Bay Rangers) were the first foot soldiers to serve in Australia, in the then colony of New South Wales. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


As Governor

Macquarie was a conservative disciplinarian who believed, in the words of the historian Manning Clark, "that the Protestant religion and British institutions were indispensable both for liberty and for a high material civilisation." When he arrived in Sydney in December 1809, he found a struggling, chaotic colony which was still basically a prison camp, with barely 5,000 European inhabitants. Macquarie ruled the colony as an enlightened despot, breaking the power of the Army officers such as John Macarthur, who had been the colony's de facto ruler since Bligh's overthrow. Manning Clark in his study in about 1988 Charles Manning Hope Clark AC (3 March 1915 – 23 May 1991), Australian historian, was the author of the best-known general history of Australia, his six-volume History of Australia, published between 1962 and 1987. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... John Macarthur (1766-1834) was a soldier, entrepreneur, politician and pioneer of the Australian wool industry. ...


Macquarie made it clear that he had a vision for Australia's future. He ordered the construction of roads, bridges, wharves, churches and public buildings. The oldest surviving buildings in Sydney, such as the Hyde Park Barracks, have his name inscribed on their porticoes. He appointed magistrates to outlying posts such as Van Diemen's Land and the Bay of Islands (now New Zealand). He founded new towns such as Richmond, Windsor, Pitt Town, Castlereagh and Wilberforce (known as the "Macquarie Towns")[1], as well as Liverpool. He appointed a Colonial Secretary, a government printer and a government architect, and commissioned his aide-de-camp Lieutenant John Watts (who had some architectural experience) to work on building projects as well. All these actions reflected his view that New South Wales, despite its origins as a penal settlement, was now to be seen as a part of the British Empire, where a free people would live and prosper and eventually govern themselves. The Hyde Park Barracks, built between 1818 and 1819, is a popular landmark in the historic precinct of Macquarie Street and Queens Square in Sydney. ... 1663 map of Van Diemens Land, showing the parts discovered by Tasman, including Storm Bay, Maria Island and Schouten Island. ... Russell, Bay of Islands Kerikeri, Bay of Islands Location of the Bay of Islands The Bay of Islands is an area in the Northland region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Richmond is a town near Sydney, Australia. ... Windsor is a town in New South Wales, Australia. ... Pitt Town is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia is located east of the Nepean River and north of Penrith. ... Wilberforce is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Liverpool is a suburb in the City of Liverpool in south western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... For other people named John Watts, see John Watts (disambiguation). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...


In 1812, the first detailed inquiry into the convict system in Australia by a Select Committee on Transportation, supported in general Macquarie's liberal policies. Among those giving evidence, was former Governor Hunter.[2] However, the committee thought that fewer tickets-of-leave should be issued and opposed the governor having the power to grant pardons. The committee concluded that the colony should be made as prosperous as possible so as to provide work for the convicts and to encourage them to become settlers after being given their freedom.[3] See also: 1811 in Australia, other events of 1812, 1813 in Australia and the Timeline of Australian history. ... A studio photograph of Tasmanian convict Bill Thompson, showing the convict uniform and the use of leg irons. ... A Select Committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster System of parliamentary democracy. ... John Hunter, Naval pioneer and colonial governor Captain John Hunter (1737– to 1821) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator who succeeded Arthur Phillip as the second governor of New South Wales, Australia from 1795 to 1800. ... A ticket of leave was a piece of paper issued to convicts transported from Britain who had served a period of probation, and had shown by their good behaviour that they could be allowed certain freedoms. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


On a visit of inspection to the settlement of Hobart Town on the Derwent River in Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania), Macquarie was appalled at the ramshackle arrangement of the town and ordered the government surveyor James Meehan to survey a regular street layout. This survey determined the form of the current centre of the city of Hobart. Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ... The Derwent is a river in Tasmania, Australia. ... 1663 map of Van Diemens Land, showing the parts discovered by Tasman, including Storm Bay, Maria Island and Schouten Island. ... Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $16,114 (7th)  - Product per capita  $33,243/person (8th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  489,600 (6th)  - Density  7. ... James Meehan (1774 - April 21, 1826) was an Irish-Australian explorer and surveyor. ...


The end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 brought a renewed flood of both convicts and settlers to New South Wales, as the sealanes became free and as the rate of unemployment and crime in Britain rose (as they always did when armies and navies were demobilised). Macquarie presided over a rapid increase in population and in economic activity - by the time of his departure the population had reached 35,000. The colony began to have a life beyond its functions as a penal settlement, and an increasing proportion of the population earned their own living. All this, in Macquarie's eyes, made a new social policy necessary. Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von Blücher Duke of Brunswick â€  Prince of Hohenlohe... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...


As reformer and explorer

Central to Macquarie's policy was his treatment of the emancipists: convicts whose sentences had expired or who had been given conditional or absolute pardons. By 1810 these outnumbered the free settlers, and Macquarie insisted that they be treated as social equals. He set the tone himself by appointing emancipists to government positions: Francis Greenway as colonial architect and Dr William Redfern as colonial surgeon. He scandalised settler opinion by appointing an emancipist, Andrew Thompson, as a magistrate, and by inviting emancipists to tea at Government House. In exchange, Macquarie demanded that the ex-convicts live reformed lives, and in particular insisted on proper marriages. An emancipist was any of the original convicts sentenced under the convict system to Australia, who was later liberated from servitude. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Francis Greenway, as shown on the 1966 Australian $10 note. ... William Redfern (born ca 1774, died Edinburgh, Scotland July 1833) was sentenced to death for his part in the naval Mutiny of the Nore in 1797. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ... “Spouse” redirects here. ...


Macquarie was the greatest sponsor of exploration the colony had yet seen. In 1813 he sent Blaxland, Wentworth and Lawson across the Blue Mountains, where they found the great plains of the interior. There he ordered the establishment of Bathurst, Australia's first inland city. He appointed John Oxley as surveyor-general and sent him on expeditions up the coast of New South Wales and inland to find new rivers and new lands for settlement. Oxley discovered the rich Northern Rivers and New England regions of New South Wales, and in what is now Queensland he explored the present site of Brisbane. Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Gregory Blaxland Gregory Blaxland (17 June 1788 — 31 December 1852) was a pioneer farmer and explorer. ... William Wentworth For the Australian politician, see William Wentworth IV William Charles Wentworth (early 1790 – 20 March 1872), Australian explorer, journalist and politician, was one of the leading figures of early colonial New South Wales. ... THE DETAILS BELOW ARE NOT FOR WILL LAWSON (1856-1957) William Lawson (1774 – 1850), explorer of New South Wales, Australia, was born in London and arrived in Sydney as an ensign with the New South Wales Corps in 1800. ... A panoramic view of the Blue Mountains The Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia, are situated approximately 100 kilometres west of Sydney. ... Bathurst is a regional centre in the state of New South Wales, Australia approximately 200km west of Sydney and is the seat of the Bathurst Regional Council Local Government Area. ... John Oxley John Oxley (1783 – 1828) was an explorer and surveyor of Australia in the early period of English colonisation. ... The Northern Rivers refers to the part of the North Coast, which lies north of the Mid North Coast region of the State of New South Wales, Australia. ... The New England region of Australia, here showing Mt Duval Approximate location of New England within New South Wales; red a narrow definition, yellow a broader definition New England is the name given to a region in the north of the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Peter Beattie (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd)  - Product per capita  $40,170/person (6th) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  4,164,590 (3rd)  - Density  2. ... Brisbane (pronounced ) is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Queensland, as well as the third largest city in Australia. ...


Macquarie established the colony's most prestigious buildings on Macquarie Street, which remains the city's preeminent address. Explorers soon noticed that the Governor liked things named after him: so Australia has the Macquarie River and Mount Macquarie, Lake Macquarie and Port Macquarie, Macquarie Harbour and Macquarie Island. Elizabeth Bay, Elizabeth Street and Mrs Macquarie's Chair (a carved chair on the eponymous point in Sydney Harbour) are named for his wife. Macquarie's own contribution to Australian nomenclature was the name "Australia," suggested by Matthew Flinders but first used in an official despatch by Macquarie in 1817. Macquarie Street, Sydney, is the most eastern street of Sydneys CBD. Extending from Hyde Park at its southern end to the Sydney Opera House at its northern end, Macquarie Street is arguably Australias most beautiful and prominent avenue. ... The Macquarie River is one of the main inland rivers in New South Wales. ... Lake Macquarie (pronounced ma-KWORRy) is Australias largest coastal saltwater lake, covering an area of 110 km² near the city of Lake Macquarie, New South Wales. ... Apartments in Port Macquarie at twilight - Hollingworth Street, Westport. ... Macquarie Harbour is a large, shallow, inlet on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... Orthographic projection over Macquarie Island Macquarie Island lies in the Southern Ocean, about half-way between Australia and Antarctica. ... Elizabeth Bay is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Elizabeth Street is one of the main north-south streets in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia, part of the Hoddle Grid laid out in 1837. ... Mrs. ... Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge located on Port Jackson Port Jackson is the natural harbour of Sydney, Australia, also known as Sydney Harbour and is the largest natural harbour in the world. ... Captain Matthew Flinders RN (16 March 1774 – 19 July 1814) was one of the most accomplished navigators and cartographers of his age. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Macquarie's policies, especially his championing of the emancipists and the lavish expenditure of government money on public works, aroused opposition both in the colony and in London, where the government still saw New South Wales as a place to dump convicts and not as a future dominion of the Empire. His statement, in a letter to the Colonial Secretary, that "free settlers in general... are by far the most discontented persons in the country," and that "emancipated convicts, or persons become free by servitude, made in many instances the best description of settlers," was much held against him. Servitude may refer to: Service conscription employment Slavery indentured servitude ...

Brass breast plate presented to the Aboriginal leader Coborn Jackey of the Burrowmunditory tribe by the squatter James White in the district of present day Young, New South Wales.
Brass breast plate presented to the Aboriginal leader Coborn Jackey of the Burrowmunditory tribe by the squatter James White in the district of present day Young, New South Wales.

Macquarie is regarded as having been ambivalent towards the Australian Aborigines. He ordered punitive expeditions against the aborigines. However, when dealing with friendly tribes, he developed a strategy of nominating a 'chief' to be responsible for each of the clans, identified by the wearing of a brass breast-plate engraved with his name and title. Although this was a typically European way of negotiation, it often did reflect the actual status of elders within tribes. [2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1494x858, 873 KB) Brass breast plate presented to the Aboriginal leader Coborn Jackey of the Burrowmunditory tribe by James White a squatter at what is now present day Young, New South Wales, , Australia. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1494x858, 873 KB) Brass breast plate presented to the Aboriginal leader Coborn Jackey of the Burrowmunditory tribe by James White a squatter at what is now present day Young, New South Wales, , Australia. ... Young is a town in the South West Slopes region of New South Wales, Australia and is the centre of Young Shire. ... Australian Aborigines are the main indigenous people of Australia. ...


Despite opposition from the British government, Macquarie encouraged the creation of the colony's first bank, the Bank of New South Wales (1817). Westpac Banking Corporation ASX: WBC NZX: WBC, usually called Westpac, is the fourth largest bank in Australasia, after the National Australia Bank, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and ANZ and one of the largest banks in the South Pacific. ...


Return to Scotland, death and legacy

Leaders of the free settler community, such as Wentworth and Macarthur, complained to London about Macquarie's policies, and in 1819 the government appointed an English judge, John Bigge, to visit New South Wales and report on its administration. Bigge generally agreed with the settlers' criticisms, and his reports on the colony led to Macquarie's resignation in 1821: he had however served longer than any other governor. Bigge also recommended that no governor should again be allowed to rule as an autocrat, and in 1824 the New South Wales Legislative Council, Australia's first legislative body, was appointed to advise the governor.[3] 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John Thomas Bigge (1780 - 1843) was an English judge. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of New South Wales in Australia. ...


Macquarie returned to Scotland, and died in London in 1824 while busy defending himself against Bigge's charges. But his reputation continued to grow after his death, especially among the emancipists and their descendants, who were the majority of the Australian population until the gold rushes. Today he is regarded by many as the real founder of Australia as a country, rather than as a prison camp. The nationalist school of Australian historians have treated him as a proto-nationalist hero. His grave in Mull is maintained at the expense of the National Trust of Australia and is inscribed "The Father of Australia." Macquarie formally adopted the name Australia for the continent, the name earlier proposed by the first circumnavigator of Australia, Matthew Flinders. As well as the many geographical features named after him in his lifetime, he is commemorated by Macquarie University in Sydney, which publishes the Macquarie Dictionary. Macquarie dictionary is published by Macquarie Library Pty Ltd, a company specifically established for the task; in October 2006 it moved away from Macquarie University to the University of Sydney Library. This article is about the country. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the Neil Young album evoking this phrase, see After the Gold Rush. ... The National Trust of Australia is a community-based, non-government organisation, committed to promoting and conserving Australias indigenous, natural and historic heritage through its advocacy work and its custodianship of heritage places and objects. ... Macquarie University is an Australian university located in Sydney. ... Image:Macq4TH 3D NEW.jpg The Macquarie Dictionary, 4th edition. ...


Macquarie was buried on the Isle of Mull in a remote mausoleum with his wife and son. Tobermory with 700 people, the largest settlement on Mull, is home to the only whisky distillery on the island. ...


Places named after Macquarie

Many places in Australia have been named in Macquarie's honour (some of these were named by Macquarie himself). They include:


At the time of his governorship or shortly thereafter:

Many years after his governorship: Orthographic projection over Macquarie Island Macquarie Island lies in the Southern Ocean, about half-way between Australia and Antarctica. ... Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $16,114 (7th)  - Product per capita  $33,243/person (8th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  489,600 (6th)  - Density  7. ... Lake Macquarie (pronounced ma-KWORRy) is Australias largest coastal saltwater lake, covering an area of 110 km² near the city of Lake Macquarie, New South Wales. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... Newcastle CBD Newcastle is the seventh largest and the second oldest city in Australia [1] and the second largest in the state of New South Wales. ... The Macquarie River is one of the main inland rivers in New South Wales. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... Bathurst is a regional centre in the state of New South Wales, Australia approximately 200km west of Sydney and is the seat of the Bathurst Regional Council Local Government Area. ... Wellington is a town and Local Government Area (see Wellington Council) located at the junction of the Macquarie River and Bell River in inland New South Wales, Australia. ... Aerial image of Dubbo viewed from the southeast For the seat in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, see Electoral district of Dubbo. ... Warren is a town and the seat of a local government area, Warren Shire, on the Macquarie River in north western New South Wales, Australia. ... The Macquarie Marshes Nature Reserve is located in the Macquarie Marshes. ... For other uses, see Barwon River (disambiguation). ... The Lachlan River is a significant river in central New South Wales, Australia. ... Apartments in Port Macquarie at twilight - Hollingworth Street, Westport. ... Length  ? km Elevation of the source  ? m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed  ? km² Origin Great Dividing Range Mouth Tasman Sea Basin countries Australia The Hastings River is a large river on the mid-North Coast of the Australian state of New South Wales that empties into the Tasman Sea... The North Coast refers to the region adjoining the Pacific Ocean in the north-eastern part of the State of New South Wales, Australia. ... Macquarie Pass is a several kilometre long section of the Illawarra Highway passing through Macquarie Pass National Park. ... Lookout from the Illawarra Escarpment above Wombarra over the northern Illawarra plain viewing Austinmer, Thirroul, Bulli, Wollongong up to Port Kembla in the far. ... The Macquarie Rivulet is a river in New South Wales which is 23 kilometers long. ... Memorial to railway workers at Robertson Robertson is a small town in the Southern Highlands district of New South Wales. ... Lake Illawarra is a large coastal lagoon, near the city of Wollongong about 100 km south of Sydney, New South Wales. ... Macquarie Street, Sydney, is the most eastern street of Sydneys CBD. Extending from Hyde Park at its southern end to the Sydney Opera House at its northern end, Macquarie Street is arguably Australias most beautiful and prominent avenue. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of New South Wales in Australia. ... Macquarie Place is a small, triangular park in downtown Sydney, Australia. ... The Macquarie Lighthouse was the first, and is the longest serving, lighthouse site in Australia. ... The Sydney Opera House on Bennelong Point. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Macquarie Street, Hobart is one of the two main streets servicing the city. ... Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ... St. ... Macquarie Harbour is a large, shallow, inlet on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... Wingecarribee is a Local Government Area (LGA) southwest of Sydney named after the Wingecarribee River, which flows through it. ... The Southern Highlands is a geographical area in New South Wales, Australia, southwest of Sydney. ... Macquarie Pass is a national park in New South Wales (Australia), 90 km southwest of Sydney. ... Memorial to railway workers at Robertson Robertson is a small town in the Southern Highlands district of New South Wales. ... The Hunter River is a major river in New South Wales, Australia. ... A view of Newcastle from Stockton Newcastle is Australias sixth largest city and the second largest in the state of New South Wales. ... Windsor is a town in New South Wales, Australia. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ...

Institutions named after Macquarie: Macquarie Park is a suburb in the north of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Macquarie Links is a suburb of Campbelltown, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Macquarie is a suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. ... The Division of Macquarie is an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. ... The Australian House of Representatives is elected from 150 single-member districts called Divisions. ...

Macquarie University is an Australian university located in Sydney. ... Macquarie Bank Limited is an Australian merchant bank and financial services group, providing a broad range of products and services to investors, corporations and government. ...

Places named after or in honour of Macquarie's wife

Places named after or in honour of Macquarie's wife, Elizabeth (nee Campbell 1778-1835):

Elizabeth Street runs both ways North-South through Hobart, from New Town in the North to the CBD and into Sullivans Cove. ... Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ... Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $16,114 (7th)  - Product per capita  $33,243/person (8th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  489,600 (6th)  - Density  7. ... Elizabeth Street is one of the main north-south streets in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia, part of the Hoddle Grid laid out in 1837. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... Elizabeth Bay is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Mrs. ... Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge located on Port Jackson Port Jackson is the natural harbour of Sydney, Australia, also known as Sydney Harbour and is the largest natural harbour in the world. ... Queen Street in Campbelltown Campbelltown is a suburb and the CBD (central business district) of the City of Campbelltown, in south-western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, located about 44 km south west of the Sydney central business district. ... Campbell Town is a town in Tasmania, Australia, located on the Midland Highway. ... Elizabeth Town is a town in Meander Valley, Tasmania. ...

Commemoration of Macquarie's birthplace

  • Mull: The Macquarie connection is distinguished, in particular, by the extremely large number of place names in New South Wales and Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) whose origins are derived from locations and features on the Isle of Mull and its environs. Macquarie used his governorship as an opportunity to commemorate, through nostalgic place names, the places and personal associations that he had kept with Mull since his boyhood. Place names include:

Glenorchy is a business district and suburb in the northern part of greater Hobart, capital of the state of Tasmania, Australia. ... Hamilton, postcode 7140, is a small country town about 1 day and a quarter hours drive from Hobart. ... The North Esk River is one of the tributaries of the Tamar River together with the South Esk River. ... The South Esk River is the longest river in Tasmania. ...

References

  1. ^ N. D. McLachlan, 'Macquarie, Lachlan (1762 - 1824)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 2, Melbourne University Press, 1967, pp 187-195.]
  2. ^ Hunter, Admiral John (1812). Evidence of Admiral John Hunter, Report From the Select Committee On Transportation. Ordered, by the House of Commons, to be printed, 10 July 1812, pp. 22-31. (pdf). Reproduced as part of archive for Anglicanism in Australia. www.anglican.org.au. Retrieved on 2006-07-10.
  3. ^ Settlement encouraged. Encyclopedia of Australian Events. Macquarienet. Retrieved on 2006-07-10.

4. Freemasonry Australia history page, [Online], Available: www.freemasonrysaust.org.au/historyearly.html [Accessed 2007, April 26] The Dictionary of Australian Biography is a reference work containing information on notable people associated with Australian history. ... Melbourne University Publishing (MUP) is the book publishing arm of the University of Melbourne (Australia). ... John Hunter, Naval pioneer and colonial governor Captain John Hunter (1737– to 1821) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator who succeeded Arthur Phillip as the second governor of New South Wales, Australia from 1795 to 1800. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

  • The Lachlan & Elizabeth Macquarie Archive - Macquarie University

The Dictionary of Australian Biography, first published in 1949, is a reference work by Percival Serle containing information on notable people associated with Australian history. ...

Further reading

  • Alexander, Alison (editor) (2005)The Companion to Tasmanian History. Centre for Tasmanian Historical Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart. ISBN 186295223X.
  • Robson, L.L. (1983) A history of Tasmania. Volume 1. Van Diemen's Land from the earliest times to 1855. Melbourne, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195543645
Government offices
Preceded by
William Bligh
Governor of New South Wales
1810–1821
Succeeded by
Thomas Brisbane

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lachlan Macquarie (636 words)
Lachlan Macquarie was born on the tiny island of Ulva, in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland and grew up on the nearby larger island of Mull.
The colony's first military governor (previous holders of the office had all been navy men), Macquarie was able to draw on his experience as a staff officer in the raising and organisation of colonial revenue-measures in this area included the introduction of coinage (1813) and the establishment of the colony's first bank (1817).
Macquarie's resignation was accepted in 1821 and he sailed for England in 1822.
Macquarie, Lachlan (1762 - 1824) Biographical Entry - Australian Dictionary of Biography Online (6122 words)
MACQUARIE, LACHLAN (1762-1824), governor, was born, according to a note in his own hand in a family Bible, on 31 January 1762 on the island of Ulva in the parish of Kilninian in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland.
Macquarie's mother, Margaret, was the only sister of Murdoch Maclaine, chieftain of Lochbuy in Mull, and as a widow she farmed her pendicle of Oskamull, with her eldest son Donald and Farquhar Maclaine, until her death in 1810 at 82.
Macquarie was to accompany his regiment, but the prospect of going abroad again so soon did not please him, especially as he reckoned that he was already the oldest lieutenant-colonel in the army and feared that the colony would be too remote to assist his further promotion.
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