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Encyclopedia > Lace
Lace appliqué and bow at the bust-line of a nightgown.
Lace appliqué and bow at the bust-line of a nightgown.

Lace is an openwork fabric, patterned with open holes in the work, made by machine or by hand. The holes can be formed via removal of threads or cloth from a previously woven fabric, but more often open spaces are created as part of the lace fabric. Lace-making is an ancient craft. True lace was not made until the late 15th and early 16th centuries. A true lace is created when a thread is looped, twisted or braided to other threads independently from a backing fabric. Lace may refer to: Look up lace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 1035 KB) Summary I took this photograph myself Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 1035 KB) Summary I took this photograph myself Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Turning in the road is a driving manoeuvre that is used to turn the car so that it is facing the opposite direction, by the use of reversing and turning. ...


Originally linen, silk, gold, or silver threads were used. Now lace is often made with cotton thread. Manufactured lace may be made of synthetic fiber. A few modern artists make lace with a fine copper or silver wire instead of thread. Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Synthetic fibres are the result of extensive research by scientists to increase and improve upon the supply of naturally occurring animal and plant fibres that have been used in making cloth and rope. ...

Contents

Types of Lace

There are many types of lace, defined by how they are made. These include:

  • Needle lace; made using a needle and thread. This is the most flexible of the lace-making arts. While some types can be made more quickly than the finest of bobbin laces, others are very time-consuming. Some purists regard Needle lace as the height of lace-making. The finest antique needle laces were made from a very fine thread that is not manufactured today.
  • Cutwork, or whitework; lace constructed by removing threads from a woven background, and the remaining threads wrapped or filled with embroidery.
  • Bobbin Lace; as the name suggests, made with bobbins and a pillow. The bobbins, turned from wood, bone or plastic, hold threads which are woven together and held in place with pins stuck in the pattern on the pillow. The pillow contains straw, preferably oat straw or other materials such as sawdust, insulation styrofoam or ethafoam. Also known as Bone-lace.
  • Tape lace; makes the tape in the lace as it is worked, or uses a machine- or hand-made textile strip formed into a design, then joined and embellished with needle or bobbin lace.
  • Knotted lace; including Macramé and Tatting. Tatted lace is made with a shuttle or a tatting needle.
  • Knitted lace; including Shetland lace, such as the "wedding ring shawl", a lace shawl so fine that it can be pulled through a wedding ring.
  • Machine-made; any style of lace created or replicated using mechanical means.

Needle Lace borders from the Erzgebirge mountains Germany in 1884, displayed in the Victoria and Albert Museum. ... Cutwork frill on a cotton petticoat. ... Whitework embroidery refers to any embroidery technique in which the stitching is the same color as the foundation fabric (traditionally white linen). ... Valenciennes Mechlin Lace Bobbin lace is a delicate lace that uses wound spools of thread (the bobbins) to weave together the shapes in the lace. ... Binomial name Avena sativa Carolus Linnaeus (1753) The Oat (Avena sativa) is a species of cereal grain, and the seeds of this plant. ... Bales of straw bundles of rice straw Pile of straw bales, sheltered under a tarpaulin Straw is an agricultural byproduct, the dry stalk of a cereal plant, after the nutrient grain or seed has been removed. ... Making bobbin lace Bobbin lace is a delicate lace that uses wound spools of thread (the bobbins) to weave together the shapes in the lace. ... Cavandoli Macrame Macramé or Macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. ... This page is about a form of lace making For other uses, see Tatting (disambiguation). ... Crochet lace is an application of the art of crochet. ... Irish crochet is a type of lace, which has its origin in the famine years of the 19th century in Ireland. ... Filet crochet is a needlework handicraft using hooks. ... Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable holes in the fabric arranged in beautiful ways. ...

History of Lace

References to lace are made in the Bible in the Book of Exodus (Exodus 28:28, King James Version). Lace was used by clergy of the early Catholic Church as part of vestments in religious ceremonies, but did not come into widespread use until the 16th century.[1] The popularity of Lace increased rapidly and the cottage industry of lace making spread throughout Europe to where most European countries. Countries like Belgium, Russia, Ireland, Spain, Hungary, Malta and others all have their own unique artistic heritage expressed through lace. For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ...


In North America in the 19th century, lace making was spread to the Native American tribes through missionaries. [2] For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ...


Gallery

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Lace

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Needlework is another term for the handicraft of decorative sewing and textile arts. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... A bobbin is a spindle or cylinder, with or without flanges, on which wire, yarn, thread or film is wound. ... A ribbon is a thin band of flexible material, typically cloth but also plastic or sometimes metal, used primarily for binding and tying. ... See-through clothing is mesh or sheer clothing that allows the wearers body to be seen through its fabric. ... Needle Lace borders from the Erzgebirge mountains Germany in 1884, displayed in the Victoria and Albert Museum. ... Punto in Aria (literally stitch in air) is an early form of Needle lace. ... Point de Venise (also Gros Point de Venise) a Venetion needle lace from the 17th century Categories: Lace stubs | Lace ... Point de France is a needle lace developed in the late 17th century. ... Alençon lace or point dAlençon is a needle lace originating from the town of Alençon, France. ... Argentan lace or Point dArgentan is a needle lace from the 18th century Categories: Lace stubs | Lace ... Hollie Point is an English needle lace noted for its use in baby clothes in the 18th and 19th century. ... Point de Gaze (sometimes Point de Gauze) is a needle lace from Belgium named for the gauze-like appearance of the mesh ground Categories: Lace stubs | Lace ... Youghal or Yougal lace is a needle lace inspired by Point de France developed in Youghal, Ireland. ... Limerick lace is an embroidered needle lace formed on a mesh using one or both of two techniques. ... Reticella is a needle lace dating from the 15th century. ... Buratto is an Italian needle lace made by darning on a net. ... Filet lace (also known as Lacis, Filet Brodé and Point Compté) is a Needle lace created by darning on a ground of netting. ... lace from Lier Tambour lace refers to a family of lace made by stretching a fine net over a frame (the eponymous Tambour, from the French for drum) and creating a chain stitch using a fine hook to reach through the net and draw the working thread through the net. ... Teneriffe lace is a needle lace from the island of Tenerife. ... Needlerun Net refers to a family of laces created by using a needle to embroider on a net ground. ... Broderie Anglaise is a whitework incorporating features of cutwork and needle lace introduced in England in the 19th century. ... Carrickmacross lace is created from an applique of fine muslin cutwork on a machine net ground. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 200 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (281 × 840 pixel, file size: 140 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Needle Lace borders from Erzgebirge mountains Germany 1884 in the Victoria and Albert Museum (Detail of photo by Andrew Dunn, cropped and rotated by User:PKM... Valenciennes Mechlin Lace Bobbin lace is a delicate lace that uses wound spools of thread (the bobbins) to weave together the shapes in the lace. ... Antwerp lace, also known as Antwerp Pot Lace, Pottenkant or Potten Kant, is a bobbin lace distinguished by sylized flower pot motifs on a six point star ground. ... Freehand Lace Freehand lace is bobbin lace worked directly on the fabric of the lace pillow without using a pricked pattern. ... The city of Chantilly was also famous for its lace, which has been made there since the 17th century, though the most famous are silk laces introduced in 18th century. ... Traditional Tønder lace motif Jordbærret (Strawberries) Tønder lace is a point-ground type of handmade bobbin lace identified with the Tønder region since about 1850, although lace of many types has been made there since as early as 1650. ... Cavandoli Macrame Macramé or Macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. ... This page is about a form of lace making For other uses, see Tatting (disambiguation). ... Crochet lace is an application of the art of crochet. ... Irish crochet is a type of lace, which has its origin in the famine years of the 19th century in Ireland. ... Hairpin lace or hairpin crochet is a textile-making technique using a crochet hook and a hairpin loom: a small handheld loom with two parallel metal prongs joined by wooden endpieces (historically, a metal U-shaped hairpin was used). ... Filet crochet is a needlework handicraft using hooks. ... Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable holes in the fabric arranged in beautiful ways. ... Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable holes in the fabric arranged in beautiful ways. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... Bobbinet is a specific type of tulle netting which has been made in the UK since the invention of the bobbinet machine in 1806 by John Heathcoat. ... Chemical Lace (sometimes referred to as Schiffli Lace) is a form of machine-made lace. ...

External links

The textile arts include feltmaking, quilting, patchwork, sewing, knitting, crochet, needlework and embroidery. ... Quilt block in applique and reverse applique Applique or appliqué (from French, applied) is an ancient needlework technique in which pieces of fabric, embroidery, or other materials are sewn onto a foundation fabric to create designs. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... Nålebinding (Danish: literally binding with a needle or needle-binding, also naalbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. ... Needlework is another term for the handicraft of decorative sewing and textile arts. ... Example of patchwork Patchwork or pieced work is a form of needlework that involves sewing together pieces of fabric into a larger design. ... Passementerie of applied gold cord and embroidery worn by Henry VIII of England (detail of a portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, c. ... Plying, in textile manufacture, is the activity of twisting, intermingling, or otherwise intimately combining two or more fibers or yarns into a combined yarn or fiber. ... Quilter and Quilters redirect here. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Sewn redirects here. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Textile printing is a general name for all woven fabrics and the art of ornamenting such fabrics by printing on designs or patterns in color is very ancient, probably originating in the East. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Ladies making silk, early 12th century painting by Emperor Huizong of Song (a remake of an 8th century original by artist Zhang Xuan), illustrates silk fabric manufacture in China. ... The history of silk begins, according to Chinese tradition, in the 27th century BC. The Chinese were able to continue making it exclusively for three millennia without ever divulging the secret process whereby it was made. ... Quilting fabric is as old as ancient Egypt if not older and wholecloth quilts were very common trade goods in wealthy circles in Europe and Asia going back as far as the 15th century. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ... Timeline of clothing and textiles technology. ... In knitting, crochet and other textile arts, blocking is a family of techniques for setting the stable dimensions of a finished textile piece by pinning it to the desired size and annealing it with heat and moisture, e. ... Fiber art is a subclassification of fine art defined by the usually exclusive use of fabrics, yarn, other natural fibers, and now synthetic fibers to focus on the properties of the material as well as the hands-on work intensive process as part of the significance of the piece. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... The Textile industry (also known in the United Kingdom and Australia as the Rag Trade) is a term used for industries primarily concerned with the design or manufacture of clothing as well as the distribution and use of textiles . ... Wearable Art, also known as Artwear, describes the making of individually designed pieces of usually hand-made clothing as artistic expressions. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lace-making - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (387 words)
Needle Lace borders from the Erzgebirge mountains Germany in 1884, displayed in the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Cutwork, or whitework, is lace which is constructed by removing threads from a woven background, and the remaining threads wrapped or filled with embroidery.
Knitted lace includes Shetland lace, such as the "wedding ring shawl", a lace shawl so fine that it can be pulled through a wedding ring.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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