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Encyclopedia > Labour Party (UK)
 
Labour Party
 
 
Leader Gordon Brown
 
Founded February 27, 1900
Headquarters 39 Victoria Street
London, SW1H 0HA
 
Ideology Democratic socialism
Social democracy
Third Way
Centre-Left
International affiliation Socialist International
European affiliation Party of European Socialists
European Parliament Group Party of European Socialists
Official colours Red
 
Website
www.labour.org.uk

The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. Founded at the start of the 20th century, it has been since the 1920s the principal party of the centre-left in Great Britain—that is, England, Scotland and Wales, but not Northern Ireland, where the Social Democratic and Labour Party occupies a roughly similar position on the political spectrum (although people in Northern Ireland are permitted to join the Labour Party). For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This is an overview of the ideologies of parties. ... Democratic socialism advocates socialism as a basis for the economy and democracy as a governing principle. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... The official symbol of Socialist International. ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) is a European political party whose members are 33 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well as Norway. ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) is a European political party whose members are 33 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well as Norway. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Left wing redirects here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ...


Labour surpassed the Liberal Party as the main opposition to the Conservatives in the early 1920s. It has had several spells in government, first as minority governments under Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 and 1929-31, then as a junior partner in the wartime coalition from 1940-1945, and then as a majority government, under Clement Attlee in 1945-51 and under Harold Wilson in 1964-70. Labour was in government again in 1974-79, under Wilson and then James Callaghan, though with a precarious and declining majority. This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... For other persons named Harold Wilson, see Harold Wilson (disambiguation). ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ...


The current national Labour government won a landslide 179 seat majority in the 1997 general election under the leadership of Tony Blair, its first general election victory since October 1974 and the first general election since 1970 in which it had exceeded 40% of the popular vote. The party's large majority in the House of Commons was slightly reduced to 167 in the 2001 general election and more substantially reduced to 66 in 2005. Labour is also the leading partner in the coalition Welsh Assembly Government, is the second largest party in the Scottish Parliament, and has representation in the European Parliament. The current party leader is Gordon Brown. In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The UK general election of October 1974 took place on October 10, 1974. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... A coalition government, or coalition cabinet, is a cabinet in parliamentary government in which several parties cooperate. ... Official logo of the Welsh Assembly Government The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: , LlCC) was firstly an executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet from 1999 to 2007. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Leader redirects here. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ...


Between January and March 2008, the Labour Party received just over £3 million in donations and are £17 million in debt; compared to the Conservatives' £6 million in donations and £12 million in borrowing, the Electoral Commission declared on 22 May 2008.[1]

Contents

Party ideology

The Labour Party grew out of the trade union movement and socialist political parties of the 19th century, and continues to describe itself as a party of democratic socialism.[2] Labour was the first political party in Great Britain to stand for the representation of the low-paid working class and it has traditionally been the working class who are known as the Labour Party grassroots and traditional members and voters[2] Traditionally, the party was in favour of socialist policies such as public ownership of key industries, government intervention in the economy, redistribution of wealth, increased rights for workers and trade unions, and a belief in the welfare state and publicly funded healthcare and education. The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers who have banded together to achieve common goals in key areas such as wages, hours, and working conditions, forming a cartel of labour. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Democratic socialism advocates socialism as a basis for the economy and democracy as a governing principle. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... This article is about state ownership. ... Statism is a term to describe an economic system where a government implements a significant degree of centralized economic planning or intervention, as opposed to a system where the overwhelming majority of economic planning occurs at a decentralized level by private individuals in a relatively free market. ... Income redistribution, or the redistribution of wealth, is a political policy usually promoted by members of the political left, and opposed, or less strongly supported, by members of the political right. ... The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers who have banded together to achieve common goals in key areas such as wages, hours, and working conditions, forming a cartel of labour. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ...


Since the mid-1980s, under the leadership of Neil Kinnock, John Smith and Tony Blair the party has moved away from its traditional socialist position towards what is often described as the "Third Way" adopting some free market and Thatcherite policies, after losing four general elections between 1979 and 1997. Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Margaret Thatcher Thatcherism is the system of political thought attributed to the governments of Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990. ...


This has led many observers to describe the Labour Party as social democratic or even neo-liberal rather than democratic socialist.[3] Blair himself has described New Labour's political position as a "Third Way". The current Labour government have brought in socialist policies such as introducing a minimum wage and increasing the spending on the NHS and education. Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... The term neoliberalism is used to describe a political-economic philosophy that had major implications for government policies beginning in the 1970s – and increasingly prominent since 1980 – that de-emphasizes or rejects positive government intervention in the economy, focusing instead on achieving progress and even social justice by encouraging free... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ...


Party constitution and structure

Main article: Labour Party Rule Book

The Labour Party is a membership organisation consisting of Constituency Labour Parties, affiliated trade unions, socialist societies, and the Co-operative Party, with which it has an electoral agreement. Members who are elected to parliamentary positions take part in the Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) and European Parliamentary Labour Party (EPLP). The party's decision-making bodies on a national level formally include the National Executive Committee (NEC), Labour Party Conference, and National Policy Forum (NPF) — although in practice the Parliamentary leadership has the final say on policy. Questions of internal party democracy have frequently provoked disputes in the party. The Labour Party Rule Book, is the governing document for the Labour Party in the United Kingdom and contains the Labour Party Constitution. ... A Constituency Labour Party (CLP) is an organisation of members of the British Labour Party who live in a particular parliamentary constituency in England, Scotland and Wales. ... In British politics, the term affiliated trade union refers to a trade union that has an affiliation to the British Labour Party. ... A Socialist Society is a membership organization which is affiliated to the Labour Party. ... This article is about the British political party. ... The Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) consists of the Labour Party in Parliament: Labour MPs as a collective body. ... The National Executive Committee or NEC is the chief administrative body of the UK Labour Party. ... The Labour Party Conference, or annual national conference of the Labour Party, is formally the supreme decision-making body of the Party. ... The National Policy Forum (NPF) of the British Labour Party is part of the policy-making system of the Party, set up by Leader Tony Blair as part of the Partnership in Power process. ...


For many years, Labour has held to a policy of uniting Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland by consent, and had not allowed residents of Northern Ireland to apply for membership,[4] instead supporting the nationalist Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) which takes the Labour whip at the House of Commons. Yet Labour has a unionist faction in its ranks, many of whom assisted in the foundation in 1995 of the UK Unionist Party lead by Robert McCartney. The 2003 Labour Party Conference accepted legal advice that the party could not continue to prohibit residents of the province joining,[5] but the National Executive has decided not to organise or contest elections there. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Unionism, in Ireland, is a belief in the desirability of a full constitutional and institutional relationship between Ireland and Great Britain based on the terms and order of government of the Act of Union 1800 which had merged both countries in 1801 to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... Robert McCartney QC MLA (born 1936) often known as Bob, is a Northern Ireland Barrister, unionist politician, and leader of the UK Unionist Party, and the only UKUP member of the currently-suspended Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


The party had 198,026 members on 31 December 2005 according to accounts filed with the Electoral Commission which was down on the previous year. In that year it had an income of about £35 million (£3.7 million from membership fees) and expenditure of about £50 million i.e. high due to the general election.[6] The Electorial Commission is an independent body with powers in the United Kingdom, which was created by an Act of Parliament, the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ...


Party electoral manifestos have not contained the term socialism since 1992, although when Clause 4 was abolished the words "the Labour Party is a democratic socialist party" were added to the party's constitution. Clause IV of the Labour Party constitution sets out the objects of the Party, and has been the scene of political fights over its direction. ...


History

Main articles: History of the British Labour Party and History of socialism in Great Britain

The History of socialism in Great Britain is generally thought to stretch back to the 19th century. ...

Founding of the party

The Independent Labour Party, founded in 1893
The Independent Labour Party, founded in 1893

The Labour Party's origins lie in the late 19th century numeric increase of the urban proletariat and the extension of the franchise to working-class males, when it became apparent that there was a need for a political party to represent the interests and needs of those groups.[7] Some members of the trade union movement became interested in moving into the political field, and after the extensions of the franchise in 1867 and 1885, the Liberal Party endorsed some trade-union sponsored candidates. In addition, several small socialist groups had formed around this time with the intention of linking the movement to political policies. Among these were the Independent Labour Party, the intellectual and largely middle-class Fabian Society, the Social Democratic Federation and the Scottish Labour Party. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ... Suffrage (from the Latin suffragium, meaning voting tablet, and figuratively right to vote; probably from suffrago hough, and originally a term for the pastern bone used to cast votes) is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... Statue of a coal miner in Charleston, WV, USA. Working class is a term used in academic sociology and in ordinary conversation. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the socio-economic class from a global vantage point. ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by gradualist and reformist, rather than revolutionary means. ... This article is about the British political party. ... The Scottish Labour Party, also known as the Scottish Parliamentary Labour Party, was formed by Robert Cunninghame-Graham, the first socialist MP in the parliament of the United Kingdom, who later went on to become the first president of the Scottish National Party, and Keir Hardie, who later became the...


In the 1895 General Election the Independent Labour Party put up 28 candidates but won only 44,325 votes. Keir Hardie, the leader of the party believed that to obtain success in parliamentary elections, it would be necessary to join with other left-wing groups. The UK general election of 1895 was held from 13th July - 7th August 1895. ... James Keir Hardie (15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915) was a Scottish socialist and labour leader, and one of the first two Labour Party Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the UK Parliament after the establishment of the Labour Party. ...


Labour Representation Committee

Keir Hardie, one of the Labour Party's founders and first leader
Keir Hardie, one of the Labour Party's founders and first leader

In 1899 a Doncaster member of the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, Thomas R. Steels, proposed in his union branch that the Trade Union Congress call a special conference to bring together all the left-wing organisations and form them into a single body which would sponsor Parliamentary candidates. The motion was passed at all stages by the TUC, and this special conference was held at the Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, London on February 27-28, 1900. The meeting was attended by a broad spectrum of working-class and left-wing organisations; trade unions representing about one third of the membership of the TUC delegates. [8] James Keir Hardie, Leader of the Labour Party This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... James Keir Hardie, Leader of the Labour Party This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... James Keir Hardie (15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915) was a Scottish socialist and labour leader, and one of the first two Labour Party Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the UK Parliament after the establishment of the Labour Party. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... Trades Union Congress headquarters at Congress House in Great Russell Street near Tottenham Court Road, Camden, London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


After a debate the 129 delegates passed Hardie's motion to establish "a distinct Labour group in Parliament, who shall have their own whips, and agree upon their policy, which must embrace a readiness to cooperate with any party which for the time being may be engaged in promoting legislation in the direct interests of labour." This created an association called the Labour Representation Committee (LRC), meant to coordinate attempts to support MPs, MPs sponsored by trade unions and representing the working-class population. It had no single leader. In the absence of one, the Independent Labour Party nominee Ramsay MacDonald was elected as Secretary. He had the difficult task of keeping the various strands of opinions in the LRC united. The October 1900 "Khaki election" came too soon for the new party to effectively campaign. Only 15 candidatures were sponsored, but two were successful: Keir Hardie in Merthyr Tydfil and Richard Bell in Derby. James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... James Keir Hardie (15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915) was a Scottish socialist and labour leader, and one of the first two Labour Party Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the UK Parliament after the establishment of the Labour Party. ... Merthyr Tydfil was a parliamentary constituency centred on the town of Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. ... Richard Bell (1859, Merthyr Tydfil—1 May 1930) was one of the first two British Labour Members of Parliament elected after the formation of the Labour Representation Committee in 1900. ... Derby is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. ...


Support for the LRC was boosted by the 1901 Taff Vale Case, a dispute between strikers and a railway company that ended with the union ordered to pay £23,000 damages for a strike. The judgement effectively made strikes illegal since employers could recoup the cost of lost business from the unions. The apparent acquiescence of the Conservative government of Arthur Balfour to industrial and business interests (traditionally the allies of the Liberal Party in opposition to the Conservative's landed interests) intensified support for the LRC against a government that appeared to have little concern for the industrial proletariat and its problems. The LRC won two by-elections in 1902–1903. The Taff Vale Case was a suit brought by the Taff Vale Railway in 1901 against the trade union to which its employees belonged, the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants. ... For the steel manufacturer, see Arthur Balfour, 1st Baron Riverdale. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ...

Labour Party Plaque from Caroone House 8 Farringdon Street (demolished 2004)
Labour Party Plaque from Caroone House 8 Farringdon Street (demolished 2004)

In the 1906 election, the LRC won 29 seats — helped by the secret 1903 pact between Ramsay Macdonald and Liberal Chief Whip Herbert Gladstone, which aimed at avoiding Labour/Liberal contests in the interest of removing the Conservatives from office. photo by lonpicman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... photo by lonpicman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ...


In their first meeting after the election, the group's Members of Parliament decided adopt the name "The Labour Party" (February 15, 1906). Keir Hardie, who had taken a leading role in getting the party established, was elected as Chairman of the Parliamentary Labour Party (in effect, the Leader), although only by one vote over David Shackleton after several ballots. In the party's early years, the Independent Labour Party (ILP) provided much of its activist base as the party did not have an individual membership until 1918 and operated as a conglomerate of affiliated bodies until that date. The Fabian Society provided much of the intellectual stimulus for the party. One of the first acts of the new Liberal government was to reverse the Taff Vale judgement. is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir David James Shackleton (1863, Rossendale – 1938) was a cotton worker and trade unionist who became the third Labour Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, following the formation of the Labour Representation Committee. ... The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by gradualist and reformist, rather than revolutionary means. ...


Early years, and the rise of the Labour Party

The December 1910 General Election saw 42 Labour MPs elected to the House of Commons. The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ...


This was a significant victory since a year before the election the House of Lords had passed the Osborne judgment which ruled that Trades Unions in the United Kingdom could no longer donate money to fund the election campaigns and wages of Labour MPs. The governing Liberals were unwilling to repeal this judicial decision with primary legislation. The height of Liberal compromise was to introduce a wage for Members of Parliament, to remove the need to involve the Trade Unions. By 1913, faced with the opposition of the largest Trade Unions, the Liberal government passed the Trade Disputes Act to once more allow Trade Unions to fund Labour MPs.


During the First World War the Labour Party split between supporters and opponents of the conflict and opposition within the party to the war grew as time went on. Ramsay MacDonald, a notable anti-war campaigner, resigned as leader of the Parliamentary Labour Party and Arthur Henderson became the main figure of authority within the Party and was soon accepted into H. H. Asquith's War Cabinet, becoming the first Labour Party member to serve in government. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ...


Despite mainstream Labour Party's support for the Coalition, the Independent Labour Party was instrumental in opposing mobilisation through organisations such as the Non-Conscription Fellowship and a Labour Party affiliate, the British Socialist Party organised a number of unofficial strikes. The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ... The British Socialist Party was a socialist party founded in Britain in 1911. ...


Arthur Henderson resigned from the Cabinet in 1917 amidst calls for Party unity, being replaced by George Barnes. The growth in Labour's local activist base and organisation was reflected in the elections following the War, with the co-operative movement now providing its own resources to the Co-operative Party after the armistice. The Co-operative Party later reached an electoral agreement with the Labour Party. The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... George Nicoll Barnes (January 2, 1859 - April 21, 1940) was a Scottish politician. ... A cooperative (also co-operative or co-op) comprises a legal entity owned and democratically controlled by its members, with no passive shareholders. ... This article is about the British political party. ...


Following the war The Liberal Party went into rapid decline. With the party suffering a catastophic split between supporters of leader David Lloyd George and former leader H. H. Asquith. This allowed the Labour Party to co-opt much of the Liberals' support. This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ...


With the Liberals in disarray, Labour won 142 seats at the 1922 General Election making it the second largest political group in the House of Commons and the official opposition to the Conservative Government. After the election, the now rehabilitated Ramsay MacDonald was voted the first official leader of the Labour Party. The UK general election of 1922 was held on 15th November 1922. ...


First Labour governments under MacDonald (1924 and 1929-31)

Ramsay MacDonald, the first Labour Prime Minister, 1924, 1929–35 (National from 1931-35)
Ramsay MacDonald, the first Labour Prime Minister, 1924, 1929–35 (National from 1931-35)

The 1923 general election was fought on the Conservatives' protectionist proposals; although they got the most votes and remained the largest party, they lost their majority in parliament, requiring a government supporting free trade to be formed. So with the acquiescence of Asquith's Liberals, Ramsay MacDonald became Prime Minister in January 1924 and formed the first ever Labour government, despite Labour only having 191 MPs (less than a third of the House of Commons). James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom the term National Government is in an abstract sense used to refer to a coalition of some or all UK major political parties. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of promoting favored domestic industries through the use of high tariffs and other regulations to discourage imports. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ...


Because the government had to rely on the support of the Liberals, it was unable to get any socialist legislation passed by the House of Commons. The only significant measure was the Wheatley Housing Act which began a building programme of 500,000 homes for rent to working-class families.


The government collapsed after only nine months when the Liberals voted for a Select Committee inquiry into the Campbell Case, a vote which MacDonald had declared to be a vote of confidence. The ensuing general election saw the publication, four days before polling day, of the notorious Zinoviev letter, which implicated Labour in a plot for a Communist revolution in Britain, and the Conservatives were returned to power, although Labour increased its vote from 30.7% of the popular vote to a third of the popular vote - most of the Conservative gains were at the expense of the Liberals. The Zinoviev letter is now generally believed to have been a forgery.[9] Sir Patrick Gardiner Hastings (March 17, 1880 - February 26, 1952) was a noted British barrister who served as Attorney General for England and Wales in 1924 and inadvertently brought down the first Labour government. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... The Zinoviev Letter is thought to have been instrumental in the Conservative Partys victory in the United Kingdom general election, 1924, which ended the countrys first Labour government. ...


In opposition, Ramsay MacDonald continued with his policy of presenting the Labour Party as a moderate force in politics. During the General Strike of 1926 he opposed strike action arguing that the best way to achieve social reforms was through the ballot box. The Subsidised Mineowner - Poor Beggar! from the Trade Union Unity Magazine (1925) Foraging for coal in the strike Tyldesley miners outside the Miners Hall during the strike The UK General Strike of 1926 lasted nine days, from 3 May 1926 to 12 May 1926, and was called by the General...


At the 1929 general election the Labour Party for the first time became the largest grouping in the House of Commons with 287 seats, and 37.1% of the popular vote (actually slightly less than the Conservatives). However, MacDonald was still reliant on Liberal support to form a minority government. The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ...

the original "liberty" logo, in use until 1983

The government however, soon found itself engufed in crisis; The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and eventual Great Depression occurred soon after the government came to power, and the crisis hit Britain hard. By the end of 1930 the unemployment rate had doubled to over two and a half million.[10] Image File history File links Oldlabour2. ... Image File history File links Oldlabour2. ... Crowd gathering on Wall Street. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


The government had no effective answers to the crisis. By the summer of 1931, a dispute over whether to introduce large cuts to public spending split the government. With the economic situation worsening, MacDonald agreed to form a "National Government" with the Conservatives and the Liberals. In the United Kingdom the term National Government is in an abstract sense used to refer to a coalition of some or all major political parties. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party to form a new party which would become known as...


On August 24 1931 MacDonald submitted the resignation of his ministers and led a small number of his senior colleagues in forming the National Government with the other parties. This move caused great anger within the Labour Party and MacDonald and his supporters were then expelled from the Labour Party and formed the National Labour Party. The remaining Labour Party, now led by Arthur Henderson, and a few Liberals went into opposition. is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... National Labor Party (Australia) National Labour Party (Brazil) National Labour Party (Ireland) National Labour Party (UK 1930s) National Labour Party (UK 1950s) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ...


Soon after this, a General Election was called. The 1931 election resulted in a landslide victory for the National Government, and was a disaster for the Labour Party which won only 52 seats, 225 fewer than in 1929. Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ...


Opposition during the 1930s

Arthur Henderson, who had been elected in 1931 as Labour leader to succeed MacDonald, lost his seat in the 1931 General Election. The only former Labour cabinet member who survived the landslide was the pacifist George Lansbury, who accordingly became party leader. The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... George Lansbury (21 February 1859 – 7 May 1940) was a British politician, socialist, Christian pacifist and newspaper editor. ...


The party experienced a further split in 1932 when the Independent Labour Party, which for some years had been increasingly at odds with the Labour leadership, opted to disaffiliate from the Labour Party. The ILP embarked on a long drawn out decline. The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Lansbury resigned as leader in 1935 after public disagreements over foreign policy. He was replaced as leader by his deputy Clement Attlee. The party experienced a revival at the 1935 General Election, winning a similar number of votes to those attained in 1929 and actually, at 38% of the popular vote, the highest percentage that Labour had ever achieved, securing 154 seats. Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... Stanley Baldwin Clement Attlee The UK general election held on 14th November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Stanley Baldwin. ...


Wartime coalition

The party was brought back into government in 1940 as part of a wartime coalition government: When Neville Chamberlain resigned as Prime Minister after the defeat in Norway in spring 1940, and incoming Prime Minister Winston Churchill decided that it was important to bring the other main parties into the government and have a Wartime Coalition similar to that in the First World War. Clement Attlee became Lord Privy Seal and a member of the War cabinet, and was effectively (and eventually formally) Deputy Prime Minister for the remainder of the duration of the War in Europe. This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Churchill redirects here. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... A Deputy Prime Minister is a member of a nations cabinet who can take the position of acting Prime Minister when the real Prime Minister is temporarily absent. ...


A number of other senior Labour figure took up senior positions: the trade union leader Ernest Bevin as Minister of Labour directed Britain's wartime economy and allocation of manpower; the veteran Labour statesman Herbert Morrison became Home Secretary; Hugh Dalton was Minister of Economic Warfare and later President of the Board of Trade; and A. V. Alexander resumed the role of First Lord of the Admiralty he had held in the previous Labour government. The party generally performed well in government, and its experience there may have been partly responsible for its post-war success. Ernest Bevin (9 March 1881 - 14 April 1951) was a British labour leader, politician, and statesman best known for his time as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government, and as Foreign Secretary in the post-war Labour government. ... Minister of Labour re-directs here. ... Herbert Morrison For others named Herbert Morrison, see Herbert Morrison (disambiguation). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton, Baron Dalton PC , generally known as Hugh Dalton (26 August 1887 – 13 February 1962) was a British Labour Party politician, and Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1945 to 1947. ... The Minister of Economic Warfare was a British government position which existed during the Second World War. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Albert Victor Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Hillsborough, KG (1 May 1885 - 11 January 1965) was a British Labour and Co-operative politician. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ...


Post-War victory under Attlee

With the end of the war in Europe in May 1945, Labour resolved not to repeat the Liberals' error of 1918, and withdrew from the government to contest the 1945 general election (July 5) in opposition to Churchill's Conservatives. Surprising many observers, Labour won a landslide victory, winning just under 50% of the vote with a majority of 145 seats. Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th...

Clement Attlee: Labour Prime Minister 1945-51
Clement Attlee: Labour Prime Minister 1945-51

Clement Attlee's government proved to be one of the most radical British governments of the 20th century. It presided over a policy of selective nationalisation of major industries and utilities, including the Bank of England, coal mining, the steel industry, electricity, gas, telephones, and inland transport (including the railways, road haulage and canals). It developed the "cradle to grave" welfare state conceived by the Liberal economist William Beveridge. To this day, the party still considers the creation in 1948 of Britain's publicly funded National Health Service under health minister Aneurin Bevan its proudest achievement. Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... The National Coal Board (NCB) was the nationalised British coal mining company. ... British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system, from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... William Henry Beveridge, 1st Baron Beveridge (5 March 1879 – 16 March 1963) was a British economist and social reformer. ... Publicly-funded health care is a health care system that is financed entirely or in majority part by citizens tax payments instead of through private payments made to insurance companies or directly to health care providers (health insurance premiums, copayments or deductibles)[citation needed]. // Publicly-funded health care systems are... NHS redirects here. ... A statue of Bevan in Cardiff. ...


Attlee's government also began the process of dismantling the British Empire when it granted independence to India in 1947. This was followed by Burma (Myanmar) and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) the following year. For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Anthem: Kaba Ma Kyei Capital Naypyidaw , Largest city Yangon (Rangoon) Official languages Burmese Recognised regional languages Jingpho, Shan, Karen, Mon, Rakhine Demonym Burmese Government Military junta  -  Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council Senior General Than Shwe  -  Vice Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council Vice-Senior General...


With the onset of the Cold War, at a secret meeting in January 1947, Attlee, and six cabinet ministers including foreign minister Ernest Bevin, secretly decided to proceed with the development of Britain's nuclear deterrent,[10] in opposition to the pacifist and anti-nuclear stances of a large element inside the Labour Party. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Ernest Bevin (9 March 1881 - 14 April 1951) was a British labour leader, politician, and statesman best known for his time as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government, and as Foreign Secretary in the post-war Labour government. ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ...


Labour won the 1950 general election but with a much reduced majority of five seats. Soon after the 1950 election, things started to go badly wrong for the Labour government. Defence became one of the divisive issues for Labour itself, especially defence spending (which reached 14% of GDP in 1951 during the Korean War[11]). These costs put enormous strain on public finances, forcing savings to be found elsewhere. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Hugh Gaitskell introduced prescription charges for NHS prescriptions, causing Bevan, along with Harold Wilson (President of the Board of Trade) to resign over the dilution of the principle of free treatment. The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ... Zoloft, an antidepressant and antianxiety medication A prescription drug is a licensed medicine that is regulated by legislation to require a prescription before it can be obtained. ... Zoloft, an antidepressant and antianxiety medication A prescription drug is a licensed medicine that is regulated by legislation to require a prescription before it can be obtained. ... For other persons named Harold Wilson, see Harold Wilson (disambiguation). ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ...


Soon after this, another election was called. Labour narrowly lost the October 1951 election to the Conservatives, despite their receiving a larger share of the popular vote and, in fact, their highest vote ever numerically. The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ...


Most of the changes introduced by the 1945-51 Labour government however were accepted by the Conservatives and became part of the "post war consensus", which lasted until the 1970s The post-war consensus was an era in British political history which lasted from the end of World War Two to the election of Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1979. ...


The "Thirteen Wasted Years"

Following their defeat in 1951 the party underwent a long period in opposition lasting thirteen years. The party suffered an ideological split during the 1950s, and the postwar economic recovery meant that the public was broadly contented with the Conservative governments of the time. Attlee remained as leader until his retirement in 1955.


His replacement Hugh Gaitskell struggled with internal divisions within the party in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and Labour lost the 1959 general election. Gaitskell's sudden death in 1963 made way for Harold Wilson to lead the party. Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... For other persons named Harold Wilson, see Harold Wilson (disambiguation). ...


The 1960s and 1970s

Labour in government under Wilson (1964-1970)

Harold Wilson, Labour Prime Minister 1964–1970 and 1974-1976
Harold Wilson, Labour Prime Minister 1964–1970 and 1974-1976

A downturn in the economy, along with a series of scandals in the early 1960s (the most notorious being the Profumo affair), engulfed the Conservative government by 1963. The Labour party returned to government with a wafer-thin 4 seat majority under Wilson in the 1964 election, and increased their majority to 96 in 1966 election. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 455 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (679 × 894 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Harold Wilson United... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 455 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (679 × 894 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Harold Wilson United... For other persons named Harold Wilson, see Harold Wilson (disambiguation). ... The Profumo Affair was a political scandal from 1963 in the United Kingdom that is named after the then-Secretary of State for War, John Profumo. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ...


Events derailed the wave of optimism which swept Labour to power in 1964. Wilson's government struggled with economic problems over the balance of payments and an ultimately doomed attempt to stave off devaluation of the pound. The balance of payments is a measure of the payments that flow from one exports and imports of goods, services, and financial capital, as well financial transfers. ... GBP redirects here. ...


Wilson's government however was responsible for a number of social and educational reforms such as legalisation of abortion and homosexuality, and the abolition of the death penalty for murder. The 1960s Labour government also expanded comprehensive education and created the Open University. Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... A Comprehensive school is a type of school providing secondary level education in England and Wales. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ...


Labour unexpectedly lost the 1970 general election to the Conservatives under Edward Heath. Heath's government however soon ran into trouble over Northern Ireland and a dispute with miners in 1973 which led to the "three-day week". The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... The Three-Day Week was one of several measures introduced in the United Kingdom by the Conservative Government 1970-1974 to conserve electricity, the production of which was severely limited due to industrial action by coal miners. ...


The 1970s proved to be a very difficult time to be in government for both the Conservatives and Labour due to the 1973 oil crisis which caused high inflation and a global recession. The 1973 oil crisis began on October 17, 1973, when the members of Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC, consisting of the Arab members of OPEC plus Egypt and Syria) announced, as a result of the ongoing Yom Kippur War, that they would no longer ship oil to nations...


Labour returned to power again under Wilson a few weeks after the February 1974 general election, forming a minority government with Ulster Unionist support. The Conservatives were unable to form a government as they had fewer seats, even though they had received more votes. It was the first General Election since 1924 in which both main parties received less than 40% of the popular vote, and was the first of six successive General Elections in which Labour failed to reach 40% of the popular vote. In a bid for Labour to gain a majority, a second election was soon called for October 1974 in which Labour, still with Harold Wilson as leader, scraped a majority of three, gaining just 18 seats and taking their total to 319. The UK general election of February 1974 was held on February 28, 1974. ... The UK general election of October 1974 took place on October 10, 1974. ...


Labour in power (1974-1979)

In government, the Labour Party's internal splits over Britain's membership of the European Economic Community (EEC) which Britain had entered under Edward Heath in 1972, led to a national referendum on the issue in 1975, in which two thirds of the public supported continued membership. The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The United Kingdom referendum of 1975 was a post-legislative referendum held on 5 June 1975 in the whole of the United Kingdom over whether there was support for it to stay in the European Economic Community, which it had entered in 1973, under the Conservative government of Edward Heath. ...

James Callaghan: Labour Prime Minster 1976-79
James Callaghan: Labour Prime Minster 1976-79

The Labour Government struggled for much of its time in office with severe economic problems and a precarious and declining majority in the commons. Fear of advances by the nationalist parties, particularly in Scotland, led to the suppression of a report from Scottish Office economist gavin McCrone which suggested that an independent Scotland would be 'chronically in surplus' and to secret collusion with Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives[citation needed]. Harold Wilson unexpectedly resigned as prime minister in 1976. He was replaced by James Callaghan. Image File history File links James_Callaghan. ... Image File history File links James_Callaghan. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ...


By 1977 Callaghan was heading a minority government after several by-election losses and defections to the breakaway Scottish Labour Party. This forced Labour to do deals with other parties. A pact was negotiated with the Liberal leader David Steel in 1977. The resultant Lib-Lab pact lasted one year. After this Labour was forced into making good their election promise to hold referendums on Scottish and Welsh devolution. In Scotland the majority of voters approved the proposition, but an amendment by George Cunningham MP which effectively meant that electors who did not cast their votes counted as 'no' voters prevented the erection of a Scottish Assembly. This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood, KT, KBE, PC (born 31 March 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... Lib-Lab Pact has been the term used to describe a working arrangement between the UKs political parties of the Liberals (later Liberal Democrats) and the Labour Party. ...


The Wilson and Callaghan governments in the 1970s tried to control inflation (which had reached 26.9% in 1975) by instituting a policy of wage restraint. Although this initially was reasonably successful, it led to increasingly strained relations between the government and the trade unions. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


During the winter of 1978-79 there were widespread strikes in favour of higher pay rises which caused significant disruption to everyday life. The strikes affected lorry drivers, railway workers, car workers and local government and hospital workers. These came to be dubbed as the "Winter of Discontent". The Winter of Discontent is a nickname given to the British winter of 1978–79, during which there were widespread strikes by Trade unions demanding larger pay rises for their members. ...


The perceived relaxed attitude of Callaghan to the crisis reflected badly upon public opinion of the government's ability to run the country. After the withdrawal of SNP support for the government, the Conservatives put down a vote of no confidence, which was held and passed by one vote on 28 March 1979, forcing a general election. A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ...


In the 1979 general election, Labour suffered electoral defeat to the Conservatives led by Margaret Thatcher. The numbers voting Labour hardly changed between February 1974 and 1979, but in 1979 the Conservative Party achieved big increases in support in the Midlands and South of England, mainly from the ailing Liberals, and benefited from a surge in turnout. The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ...


The 'Wilderness Years' (1979-1997)

Following their defeat at the 1979 election, the Labour Party underwent a period of bitter internal rivalry in the Labour Party which had become increasingly divided between the ever more dominant left wingers under Michael Foot and Tony Benn (whose supporters dominated the party organisation at the grassroots level), and the right under Denis Healey. For other persons named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... Anthony Tony Neil Wedgwood Benn (born 3 April 1925), formerly 2nd Viscount Stansgate, is a British socialist politician. ... Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey, CH, MBE, PC (born 30 August 1917), is a British Labour politician. ...


The election of Michael Foot as leader in 1980, dismayed many on the right of the party, who believed that Labour was becoming too left-wing. In 1981 a group of four former cabinet ministers from the right and centre of the Labour Party (Shirley Williams, William Rodgers, Roy Jenkins, and David Owen) issued the "Limehouse Declaration" and formed the breakaway Social Democratic Party. In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... The Baroness Williams of Crosby Shirley Williams, Baroness Williams of Crosby, PC (born July 27, 1930), is a British politician. ... People named Bill Rodgers: Bill Rodgers (politician), British politician Bill Rodgers (athlete), American marathon runner This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... For other persons named David Owen, see David Owen (disambiguation). ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a United Kingdom political party which existed between 1981 and 1990. ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a political party of the United Kingdom that existed nationwide between 1981 and 1988. ...


Margaret Thatcher's government was initially deeply unpopular due to high unemployment and inflation. However the success of the Falklands War in 1982 revived her popularity. The Labour Party was defeated by a landslide in the 1983 general election winning only 27.6% of the vote, their lowest share since 1918. Labour won only half a million votes more than the SDP-Liberal Alliance which had attracted the votes of many moderate Labour supporters. Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The SDP-Liberal Alliance was an electoral alliance of the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party in the UK that ran from 1981 to 1988, when the bulk of the two parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later referred to as simply the Liberal Democrats. ...


Michael Foot resigned as leader and was replaced by Neil Kinnock, who progressively moved the party towards the centre. Labour improved its performance at the 1987 general election, gaining 20 seats reducing the Conservative majority to 102 from 143 in 1983, despite a sharp rise in turnout. Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ...


Margaret Thatcher was replaced as prime minister by John Major in 1990. By the time of the 1992 general election, the economy was in recession and Labour looked like it could win. The party had reformed to such an extent that it was perceived as a credible government-in-waiting. Most opinion polls showed the party to have a slight lead over the Conservatives, although rarely sufficient for a majority. In the event the Conservatives were returned to power but with a much reduced majority of 20. Although Labour's support was comparable to the February and October 1974 and May 1979 General Elections, the overall turnout was much larger. For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. ...


Kinnock resigned as leader and was replaced by John Smith. Soon after the 1992 election, the Conservative government ran into trouble, when on 'Black Wednesday' it was forced to leave the European Exchange Rate Mechanism. After this, Labour moved ahead in the opinion polls as the Conservatives became unpopular. John Smith died suddenly from a heart attack in May 1994. His death made way for Tony Blair to lead the Party. John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... In British politics and economics, Black Wednesday refers to 16 September 1992 when the Conservative government was forced to withdraw the pound from currency fix, the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) after they were unable to keep Sterling above its agreed lower limit when currency markets believed the policy was... The European Exchange Rate Mechanism, ERM, was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for Economic and Monetary Union and the introduction of a single currency... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


New Labour

Recent logo of Labour Party
Recent logo of Labour Party

Tony Blair moved the party further to the right, adopting policies which broke with Labour's socialist heritage at the 1995 mini-conference, in a strategy to increase the party's appeal to "middle England". Middle England originally indicated the central region of England, now almost always referred to as the Midlands. ...

Tony Blair, Labour Prime Minister 1997-2007
Tony Blair, Labour Prime Minister 1997-2007

"New Labour" was first termed as an alternative branding for the Labour Party, dating from a conference slogan first used by the Labour Party in 1994 which was later seen in a draft manifesto published by the party in 1996, called New Labour, New Life For Britain. The rise of the name coincided with a rightwards shift of the British political spectrum; for Labour, this was a continuation of the trend that had begun under the leadership of Neil Kinnock. "New Labour" as a name has no official status but remains in common use to distinguish modernisers from those holding to more traditional positions who normally are referred to as "Old Labour". For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Look up manifesto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ...


In government

Main articles: Current Labour government (UK), Premiership of Tony Blair, and Premiership of Gordon Brown

With the unpopularity of John Major's government, the Labour party won the 1997 election with a landslide majority of 179. Wikinews has news related to: Premiership of Tony Blair The Premiership of Tony Blair began on 2 May 1997 and continues with Blairs third term as Prime Minister. ... Main article: Gordon Brown The premiership of Gordon Brown began on 27 June 2007, when Brown accepted the Queens invitation to form a government, replacing Tony Blair as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ...


Among the early acts of Tony Blair's government were the establishment of the National minimum wage, the devolution of power to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and the re-creation of a city-wide government body for London; the Greater London Authority. The National Minimum Wage Act 1998 was a flagship policy of the Labour Party in the UK during its 1997 election campaign and is still pronounced today in New Labour Party circulars as an outstanding gain for ‘at least 1. ... Look up Devolution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) is the city-wide governing body for London, England. ...


Labour went on to win the 2001 election with a similar majority to 1997. Tony Blair controversially allied himself with President George W Bush in supporting the Iraq War, which lost his government much support; at the 2005 election, Labour was returned to power with a much reduced majority. Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001 and re-elected in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ...


In 2007, Labour lost the Scottish General Election and Tony Blair stood down as prime minister and was replaced by Gordon Brown. During May 2008, Labour suffered heavy defeats in the London mayoral election, local elections and the Crewe and Nantwich by-election, culminating in the party registering its worst ever opinion poll result since records began in 1943, of 23%.[12] For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... The London mayoral election, 2008 for the office of Mayor of London was held on 1 May 2008 and was won by Conservative party candidate Boris Johnson. ... The 2008 United Kingdom local elections will be held on 1 May 2008. ...


Electoral performance

This chart shows the electoral performance of the Labour Party in general elections since 1900. (Source [1])

A graph showing the percentage of the popular vote received by major parties in general elections, 1832-2005. The rapid rise of the Labour party after its founding during the Victorian era is clear, and the party is now considered as one of the dominant forces in British politics.
Election Number of votes for Labour Share of votes Seats Outcome of election
1900 62,698 1.8% 2 Conservative Victory
1906 321,663 5.7% 29 Liberal Victory
1910 (January) 505,657 7.6% 40 Hung parliament (Liberal minority government)
1910 (December) 371,802 7.1% 42 Hung parliament (Liberal minority government)
1918 2,245,777 21.5% 57 Liberal/Conservative Coalition Victory
1922 4,076,665 29.7% 142 Conservative Victory
1923 4,267,831 30.7% 191 Hung parliament (Labour minority government)
1924 5,281,626 33.3% 151 Conservative Victory
1929 8,048,968 37.1% 287 Hung parliament (Labour minority government)
1931 6,339,306 30.8% 52 National Government Victory
1935 7,984,988 38.0% 154 National Government Victory
1945 11,967,746 49.7% 393 Labour Victory
1950 13,266,176 46.1% 315 Labour Victory
1951 13,948,883 48.8% 295 Conservative Victory
1955 12,405,254 46.4% 277 Conservative Victory
1959 12,216,172 43.8% 258 Conservative Victory
1964 12,205,808 44.1% 317 Labour Victory
1966 13,096,629 48.0% 364 Labour Victory
1970 12,208,758 43.1% 288 Conservative Victory
1974 (February) 11,645,616 37.2% 301 Hung parliament (Labour minority government)
1974 (October) 11,457,079 39.2% 319 Labour Victory
1979 11,532,218 36.9% 269 Conservative Victory
1983 8,456,934 27.6% 209 Conservative Victory
1987 10,029,807 30.8% 229 Conservative Victory
1992 11,560,484 34.4% 271 Conservative Victory
1997 13,518,167 43.2% 419 Labour Victory
2001 10,724,953 40.7% 413 Labour Victory
2005 9,562,122 35.3% 356 Labour Victory

The first election held under the Representation of the People Act 1918 in which all men over 21, and most women over the age of 30 could vote, and therefore a much larger electorate. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 502 pixelsFull resolution (3043 × 1909 pixel, file size: 435 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) made by myself I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 502 pixelsFull resolution (3043 × 1909 pixel, file size: 435 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) made by myself I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Lord Salisbury Henry Campbell-Bannerman Keir Hardie The campaign for United Kingdom general election of 1900 was held from 25 September to 24 October 1900. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The UK general election of January 1910 was held from 15th January – 10th February 1910. ... In Parliamentary systems, a hung parliament is one in which no one political party has an outright majority. ... For minority governments in general, see dominant minority. ... The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The UK general election of 1922 was held on 15th November 1922. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ... In the United Kingdom the term National Government is in an abstract sense used to refer to a coalition of some or all UK major political parties. ... Stanley Baldwin Clement Attlee The UK general election held on 14th November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Stanley Baldwin. ... Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ... The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on May 26, 1955, four years after the previous general election. ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The UK general election of February 1974 was held on February 28, 1974. ... Harold Wilson Edward Heath The United Kingdom general election of October 1974 took place on 10 October 1974. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... The Representation of the People Act 1918 widened suffrage by abolishing practically all property qualifications for men and by enfranchising women over 30 who met minimum property qualifications. ...


The first election under universal suffrage in which all women aged over 21 could vote. Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ...


Leaders of the Labour Party

The post of Leader of the Labour Party was created in 1922. Before this (1906-22) the post was known as Chairman of the Parliamentary Labour Party.[13]

Portrait Entered office Left office Length of Leadership Date of Birth and Death
1 Keir Hardie 17 February 1906 22 January 1908 1 year, 11 months, 5 days 15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915
2 Arthur Henderson 22 January 1908 14 February 1910 2 years, 3 weeks, 2 days 13 September 1863 - 20 October 1935
3 George Nicoll Barnes 14 February 1910 6 February 1911 11 months, 3 weeks, 2 days 2 January 1859 - 21 April 1940
4 James Ramsay MacDonald 6 February 1911 5 August 1914 3 years, 5 months, 4 weeks, 2 days 12 October 1866 - 9 November 1937
5 Arthur Henderson 5 August 1914 24 October 1917 3 years, 2 months, 2 weeks, 5 days (See Box No.2)
6 William Adamson 24 October 1917 14 February 1921 3 years, 3 months, 3 weeks 2 April 1863 - 23 February 1936
7 John Robert Clynes 14 February 1921 21 November 1922 1 year, 9 months, 1 week 27 March 1869 - 23 October 1949
8 James Ramsay MacDonald 21 November 1922 1 September 1931 8 years, 9 months, 1 week, 4 days (See Box No.4)
9 Arthur Henderson 1 September 1931 25 October 1932 1 year, 1 month, 3 weeks, 3 days (See Box No.2)
10 George Lansbury 25 October 1932 8 October 1935 2 years, 11 months, 1 week, 6 days 21 February 1859 - 7 May 1940
11 Clement Attlee 8 October 1935 14 December 1955 20 years, 2 months, 6 days 3 January 1883 - 8 October 1967
12 Hugh Gaitskell 14 December 1955 18 January 1963 7 years, 1 month, 4 days 9 April 1906 - 18 January 1963[14]
13 George Brown 18 January 1963[15] 14 February 1963 3 weeks, 6 days 2 September 1914 - 2 June 1985
14 Harold Wilson[16] 14 February 1963 5 April 1976 13 years, 1 month, 3 weeks, 1 day 11 March 1916 - 24 May 1995
15 James Callaghan 5 April 1976 3 November 1980 4 years, 6 months, 4 weeks, 1 day 27 March 1912 - 26 March 2005
16 Michael Foot 3 November 1980 2 October 1983 2 years, 10 months, 4 weeks, 1 day 23 July 1913 - present
17 Neil Kinnock 2 October 1983 18 July 1992 8 years, 9 months, 2 weeks, 2 days 28 March 1942 - present
18 John Smith 18 July 1992 12 May 1994 1 year, 9 months, 3 weeks, 3 days 13 September 1938 - 12 May 1994[17]
19 Margaret Beckett 12 May 1994 21 July 1994 2 months, 1 week, 2 days 15 January 1943 - present
20 Tony Blair 21 July 1994[18][19][20] 24 June 2007 12 years, 11 months, 3 days 6 May 1953 - present
21 Gordon Brown 24 June 2007 Present 20 February 1951 - present

Although these were technically leaders of the Labour Party, they only assumed this role because of the death of the incumbent and were not elected to the post. They were in effect acting leaders. James Keir Hardie (August 15, 1856 - September 26, 1915) was a Scottish born socialist and labour leader, and the first Labour MP to be elected to the UK parliament. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the day of the year. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... Arthur Henderson, Leader of the Labour Party on three occasions File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... George Nicoll Barnes (January 2, 1859 - April 21, 1940) was a Scottish politician. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (October 12, 1866 - November 9, 1937) was Britains first Labour Prime Minister (January-November 1924 and June 1929-August 1931) and subsequently Prime Minister of the National Government of August 1931-June 1935. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... Arthur Henderson, Leader of the Labour Party on three occasions File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... William Adamson (1863–1936) was born in Dunfermline, Scotland and worked as a miner in Fife where he became involved with the National Union of Mineworkers. ... William Adamson, Secretary for Scotland in 1924 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rt. ... J.R. Clynes, Secretary of State for the Home Department File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (October 12, 1866 - November 9, 1937) was Britains first Labour Prime Minister (January-November 1924 and June 1929-August 1931) and subsequently Prime Minister of the National Government of August 1931-June 1935. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... Arthur Henderson, Leader of the Labour Party on three occasions File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Lansbury (21 February 1859 – 7 May 1940) was a British politician, socialist, Christian pacifist and newspaper editor. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... George Alfred Brown, later George Alfred George-Brown, Baron George-Brown, PC (2 September 1914 – 2 June 1985) was a British politician who served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party from 1960 to 1970, and was a senior Cabinet minister (including as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs) in... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other persons named Harold Wilson, see Harold Wilson (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 455 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (679 × 894 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Harold Wilson United... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... Image File history File links James_Callaghan. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Margaret Mary Beckett (née Jackson; born 15 January 1943) is a British Labour politician and Member of Parliament (MP) for Derby South. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 331 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (828 × 1500 pixel, file size: 154 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Deputy leaders of the Labour Party since 1922

Rt. ... Rt. ... William Graham (29 July 1887 – 8 January 1932) was a British Labour politician. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... Arthur Greenwood (1880—1954) became deputy leader of the Labour Party under Clement Attlee, with Winston Churchill appointing him to the Cabinet as Minister without Portfolio in 1940. ... Herbert Stanley Morrison, Baron Morrison of Lambeth (January 3, 1888 - March 6, 1965) was a British Labour Party politician and cabinet minister. ... James Jim Griffiths (1890-1975) was a Welsh Labour politician, the prime mover in the establishment of the Welsh Office. ... A statue of Bevan in Cardiff. ... George Alfred Brown, later George Alfred George-Brown, Baron George-Brown, PC (2 September 1914 – 2 June 1985) was a British politician who served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party from 1960 to 1970, and was a senior Cabinet minister (including as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs) in... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... Edward Watson Short, Baron Glenamara (born 17 December 1912), is a former Labour MP for Newcastle upon Tyne, who was a minister during the Labour Governments of Harold Wilson. ... For other persons named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey, CH, MBE, PC (born 30 August 1917), is a British Labour politician. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... Margaret Mary Beckett (née Jackson; born 15 January 1943) is a British Labour politician and Member of Parliament (MP) for Derby South. ... For other persons named John Prescott, see John Prescott (disambiguation). ... Harriet Ruth Harman, QC (born 30 July 1950) is a British solicitor (professional legal adviser) and Labour politician. ...

Leaders of the Labour Party in the House of Lords since 1924

Lord Haldane The Labour Lord Chancellor. ... Charles Alfred Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor KCVO , QC , PC (October 3, 1852 – June 30, 1941) was a British politician who crossed the floor from the Conservative to the Labour Party and was a strong supporter of the League of Nations and of Church of England causes. ... Arthur Augustus William Harry Ponsonby, 1st Baron Ponsonby of Shulbrede (16 February 1871 - 23 March 1946) was a British politician, writer, and social activist. ... Henry Snell, 1st Baron Snell (1 April 1865 - 21 April 1944), was a British socialist politician and campaigner. ... Christopher Addison, 1st Viscount Addison, KG, PC (19 June 1869 - 11 December British medical doctor and politician. ... William Allen Jowitt, 1st Earl Jowitt (15 April 1885 - 16 August 1957), was a British lawyer and politician. ... Albert Victor Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Hillsborough, (1 May 1885 - 11 January British Labour and Co-operative politician. ... Francis Aungier Frank Pakenham, 7th Earl of Longford, KG, PC (December 5, 1905 - August 3, 2001) was a politician, author, and social reformer. ... Right Hon. ... Malcolm Newton Shepherd, 2nd Baron Shepherd (1918-2001) was a British Labour politician and peer who served as Leader of the House of Lords under Harold Wilson from 1974 to 1976. ... Fred Peart, Baron Peart (1914-1988) was a British Labour politician who served in the Labour governments of the 60s and 70s. ... Cledwyn Hughes, Baron Cledwyn of Penrhos, CH, PC, (14 September 1916 – 22 February 2001), was a Welsh Labour politician. ... Ivor Seward Richard, Baron Richard, PC (born May 30, 1932), is a British politician and former member of the Commission of the European Communities. ... Margaret Ann Jay, Baroness Jay of Paddington, PC (born November 18, 1939) is a British politician for the Labour Party. ... For the American actor of the same name, please see Gareth Williams. ... Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, PC (born 13 March 1954) is a British Labour Party politician and life peer, formerly serving as Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council. ... Catherine Margaret Ashton, Baroness Ashton of Upholland PC (born 20 March 1956) is a Labour member of the House of Lords. ...

See also

This article is about the British political party. ... Labour Co-operative describes those candidates in British elections standing on behalf of both the Labour Party and the Co-operative Party, based on a national agreement between the two parties. ... // Origins The Reformation occurred later in Britain than in most of mainland Europe. ... The election for the next leader of the Labour Party is due to take place following the death, resignation, retirement or removal of Prime Minister Tony Blair, who has led the party since July 21, 1994. ... This a list of organisations that are associated with the Labour Party. ... This is a list of Labour Party MPs. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The 2007 Labour Party Leadership Election campaign is already underway, but is still awaiting an announcement of a vacancy by Tony Blair which is to be followed within 72 hours by a meeting of Labours NEC to decide a timetable. ... The Wales Labour Party, also known as Welsh Labour, is the part of the Labour Party which operates in Wales. ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Socialist Party is a Trotskyist political party active in England and Wales and part of the Committee for a Workers International. ... Labour Students is an independent student organisation affiliated to the British Labour Party. ...

References

  1. ^ New figures published showing political parties' donations and borrowing [[Electoral Commission (United Kingdom) The Electoral Commission 22 May 2008]
  2. ^ a b Labour's policies. Retrieved on 2007-07-21.
  3. ^ New Labour and Thatcherism: Political Change in Britain, Richard Heffernan, 2001; New Labour has picked up where Thatcherism left off, Stuart Hall, The Guardian, August 6, 2003; From Thatcherism to New Labour: Neo-Liberalism, Workfarism and Labour Market Regulation, Professor Bob Jessop, Lancaster University; New Labour, Economic Reform and the European Social Model, Jonathon Hopkin and Daniel Wincott, British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 2006.
  4. ^ Labour Party membership form at the Internet Archive Wayback Machine, ca. 1999. via Internet Archive. Accessed 31 March 2007. "Residents of Northern Ireland are not eligible for membership."
  5. ^ Labour NI ban overturned, BBC News. 1 October 2003. Accessed 31 March 2007.
  6. ^ The Labour Party - Financial Statements for 2005.
  7. ^ See, for instance, the 1899 Lyons vs. Wilkins judgement, which limited certain types of picketing
  8. ^ Mortimer, Jim, ‘The formation of the labour party - Lessons for today’ 2000 Jim Mortimer was a General Secretary of the Labour Party in the 1980s
  9. ^ The truth about Churchill's spy chief and the Zinoviev Letter.
  10. ^ a b Davies, A.J. (1996) To Build A New Jerusalem: The British Labour Party from Keir Hardie to Tony Blair, Abacus, ISBN 0349 108099
  11. ^ Clark, Sir George, Illustrated History Of Great Britain, (1987) Octupus Books
  12. ^ Reuters Brown hit by worst party rating, 30 May 2008
  13. ^ Thorpe, Andrew. (2001) A History Of The British Labour Party, Palgrave, ISBN 0-333-92908-x
  14. ^ Labour leader Hugh Gaitskell dies BBC News
  15. ^ George Brown was leader under Labour Constitution having been Deputy Leader at time of death of leader. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  16. ^ Harold Wilson retires BBC News
  17. ^ Died from Heart Attack while Leader of the Opposition. BBC News
  18. ^ Labour chooses Blair BBC News
  19. ^ First Labour Prime Minister since James Callaghan BBC News
  20. ^ First Labour leader to win three General Elections in a row BBC News

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Affiliations 1994 Group N8 Group Association of MBAs North West Universities Association Website http://www. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ...

Further reading

  • Davies, A.J, To Build A New Jerusalem (1996) ISBN 0349108099
  • Stephen Driver and Luke Martell, New Labour: Politics after Thatcherism, 1998, and Blair's Britain, 2002, Polity Press.
  • Geoffrey Foote, The Labour Party's Political Thought: A History, Macmillan, 1997 ed.
  • Martin Francis, Ideas and Policies under Labour 1945-51, Manchester University Press, 1997. ISBN 0719048338
  • Roy Hattersley, New Statesman, May 10, 2004, 'We should have made it clear that we too were modernisers'
  • David Howell, British Social Democracy, Croom Helm, 1976
  • David Howell, 'MacDonald's Party, Oxford University Press, 2002.
  • Ralph Miliband, Parliamentary Socialism, Merlin, 1960, 1972.
  • Kenneth O. Morgan, Labour in Power, 1945-51,OUP 1984.
  • Kenneth O. Morgan, Labour People: Leaders and Lieutenants, Hardie to Kinnock OUP, 1987.
  • Henry Pelling and Alastair J. Reid, A Short History of the Labour Party, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005 ed.
  • Ben Pimlott, Labour and the Left in the 1930s,Cambridge University Press, 1977.
  • Raymond Plant, Matt Beech and Kevin Hickson (2004), The Struggle for Labour's Soul: understanding Labour's political thought since 1945, Routledge
  • Clive Ponting, Breach of Promise (1964-70), Hamish Hamilton 1989.
  • Greg Rosen, Dictionary of Labour Biography. Politicos Publishing, 2001. ISBN 1902301188
  • Greg Rosen, Old Labour to New, Politicos Publishing, 2005. ISBN 1842750453
  • Eric Shaw, The Labour Party since 1979: Crisis and Transformation, Routledge, 1994
  • Andrew Thorpe, A History of the British Labour Party, Palgrave Macmillan, 2001
  • Phillip Whitehead, The Writing on the Wall Michael Joseph, 1985.
  • Patrick Wintour and Colin Hughes, Labour Rebuilt Fourth Estate, 1990.
  • John Pilger, Freedom Next time Bantam Press 2006. ISBN 0593055527.

Manchester University Press is the university press of the University of Manchester, England. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... The New Statesman is a left-of-centre political weekly published in London. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Professor Ben Pimlott (4 July 1945 - April 10, 2004) was a leading historian of the post-war period in Britain. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Clive Ponting is a British writer and academic. ... The Hamish Hamilton logo Hamish Hamilton is a British book publisher, founded eponymously by the half-Scot half-American Jamie Hamilton (Hamish is the Celtic form). ... For the publishing company of this name, see Pearson PLC Michael Joseph (1914-1981) was a British author on cats, among other subjects. ... In modern times, television reporters are part of the fourth estate. ... John Pilger at the Humber Mouth Hull literature festival 2006 John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney, primarily based in London, England. ...

External links

Other British political parties

This is a list of political parties in the United Kingdom. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... This article is about the political party in Northern Ireland. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left, Social democratic political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Clare Short (born 15 February 1946) is a British politician and a member of the British Labour Party. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced ) is a British political party. ... Respect – The Unity Coalition is a left wing political party in England and Wales founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... A cross-bencher is a member of the British House of Lords who is not aligned to any particular party. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced ) is a British political party. ... The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom, also called Spiritual Peers, consist of the 26 clergymen of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords along with the Lords Temporal. ... David Robert Stevens, Baron Stevens of Ludgate is the only Conservative Independent peer in the House of Lords. ... David Leonard Stoddart, Baron Stoddart of Swindon, of Reading in the Royal County of Berkshire is a British Independent Labour politician (that is, unaffiliated to the British Labour Party), raised to the peerage as a life peer in 1983. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left, Social democratic political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... The Scottish Conservative Party (officially the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party), often referred to as the Scottish Tories (see Tory), is the part of the British Conservative Party that operates in Scotland. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... Established 1999 by the Government of Wales Act 1998 Presiding Officer Lord Elis-Thomas AM (Plaid) Since May 12, 1999 Deputy Presiding Officer Rosemary Butler AM (Lab) Leader of the House Carwyn Jones AM (Lab) Chief Executive and Clerk to the Assembly Claire Clancy Political parties 6 Welsh Labour (26... The Wales Labour Party, also known as Welsh Labour, is the part of the Labour Party which operates in Wales. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... The Welsh Conservative Party is the part of the Conservative Party which operates in Wales. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant. ... This article is about the political party in Northern Ireland. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Green Party in Northern Ireland is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) are a small political party from Northern Ireland. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) is a European political party whose members are 33 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well as Norway. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, mainly active in the European Union, composed of 49 national liberal and centrist parties from across Europe. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced ) is a British political party. ... The Independence/Democracy Group in the European Parliament was set up on 20 July 2004. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... European Greens (or the European Green Party) is the name of the European Green Party, a political party at European level. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left, Social democratic political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ... GUE-NGL logo The European United Left–Nordic Green Left is a socialist and communist political grouping within the European Parliament. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... The Alliance of Independent Democrats in Europe (most commonly represented in French, as Alliance des Démocrates Indépendants en Europe) is an apparent European political party, whose existence is claimed by both itself and by the EUDemocrats[1]. Little, however, is known about the composition of the ADIE or... Non-Inscrits (English: Non-Attached; the English name is also official, but the French name is prevalent even in English texts) are Members of the European Parliament who do not sit in one of the political groups. ... Non-Inscrits (English: Non-Attached; the English name is also official, but the French name is prevalent even in English texts) are Members of the European Parliament who do not sit in one of the political groups. ... This article is about the British political party. ... The English Democrats Party is the largest English Nationalist political party in England committed to the formation of a devolved English Parliament with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ... Forward Wales (or Cymru Ymlaen in Welsh) is a political party operating in Wales. ... The Liberal Party is a United Kingdom political party. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a radical left-wing Scottish political party which campaigns on a socialist economic platform and for Scottish independence. ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... Solidarity (full name Solidarity – Scotlands Socialist Movement) is a political party in Scotland, launched on September 3, 2006 as a breakaway from the Scottish Socialist Party (SSP)[1] in the aftermath of Tommy Sheridans libel action. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The Politics of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland takes place in the framework of a constitutional monarchy in which the Monarch is head of state and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government. ...

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Labour Party (UK) - guideofcasinos.com (4677 words)
The Labour Party's origins lie in the late 19th century, when it became apparent that there was an increasing need for a third party in Britain to represent the interests and needs of the large working-class population (for instance, the 1899 Lyons vs. Wilkins judgement that limited certain types of picketing).
The ILP under James Maxton disaffiliated from the Labour Party in 1932, removing a substantial proportion of the left of the party from membership.
Labour's chances of electoral success were further damaged by the fact that the Thatcher government's popularity was on the rise after successfully guiding the country to victory in the Falklands War.
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