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Encyclopedia > Labor relations
A Boeing employee speaks at an industrial relations rally
A Boeing employee speaks at an industrial relations rally

The field of labor relations looks at the relationship between management and workers, particularly groups of workers represented by a labor union. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 1106 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Labor relations Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 1106 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Labor relations Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661 ) is the world’s largest aircraft manufacturer. ... Management (from Old French ménagement the art of conducting, directing, from Latin manu agere to lead by the hand) characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organisation, often a business, through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


Labor relations is an important factor in analyzing "varieties of capitalism", such as neocorporatism (or corporatism), social democracy, and neoliberalism (or liberalism). Historically, corporatism or corporativism (Italian corporativismo) is a political system in which legislative power is given to civic assemblies that represent economic, industrial, agrarian, and professional groups. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... For the school of international relations, see Neoliberalism (international relations). ... This article discusses liberalism as a major worldwide political ideology, its development, and its many modern-day variations. ...


Labor relations can take place on many levels, such as the "shop-floor", the regional level, and the national level. The distribution of power amongst these levels can greatly shape the way an economy functions.


Another key question when considering systems of labor relations is their ability to adapt to change. This change can be technological (e.g., "What do we do when an industry employing half the population becomes obsolete?"), economic (e.g., "How do we respond to globalization?"), or political (e.g., "How dependent is the system on a certain party or coalition holding power?"). Look up Change in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Globalisation although often described as the cause of much turbulence and change, is in fact the umbrella term for the collective effect, the change itself. ...


Governments set the framework for labor relations through legislation and regulation. Usually, employment law would cover issues such as minimum wages and wrongful dismissal. Bold textJAMES CHECKLEY Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... Employment law is the branch of the law that deals with employment related issues. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Wrongful dismissal is an idiom and legal phrase, describing a situation in which an employees contract of employment has been terminated by the employer in circumstances where the termination breaches one or more terms of the contract of employment, or a statute provision in employment law. ...


Industrial relations is the equivalent term in Australia, though in recent years the term workplace relations has also become common. This has become a prominent issue of late as the Liberal Government attempts to make sweeping changes to Australian working conditions and employee rights.

Contents


See also

Economic and finance related

Globalisation although often described as the cause of much turbulence and change, is in fact the umbrella term for the collective effect, the change itself. ... Specialization is an important way to generate propositional knowledge, by applying general knowledge, such as the theory of gravity, to specific instances, such as when I release this apple, it will fall to the floor. Specialization is the opposite of generalization. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... The secondary sector of industry is the manufacturing sector of industry. ...

Employment related

Collective agreement is a labor contract between an employer and one or more unions. ... In labor economics, the efficiency wage hypothesis argues that wages, at least in some markets, are determined by more than simply supply and demand. ... An employment contract is an agreement entered into between an employer and an employee at the commencement of the period of employment and stating the exact nature of their business relationship, specifically what compensation the employee will receive in exchange for specific work performed. ... An indentured servant is a labourer under contract (an indenture--explained below) to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person or a company/corporation, often without any monetary pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials, training, or passage to a new country. ... Labour law (American English: labor) or employment law is the body of laws, administrative rulings, and precedents which addresses the legal rights of, and restrictions on, workers and their organisations. ... A skilled worker is any worker who has some special knowledge or (usually acquired) ability in his work. ... An 1837 political cartoon about unemployment in the United States. ... The National Labor Relations Board, an agency within the United States government, was created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. ... Remuneration is pay or salary, typically monetary compensation for services rendered, as in a employment. ... In law a commission is a patent which allows a person to take possession of a state office and carry out official acts and duties. ... Employee stock options are stock options for the companys own stock that are often offered to upper-level employees as part of the executive compensation package, especially by American corporations. ... Employee benefits (also called fringe benefits, perquisites, or perks) are various non-wage compensations provided to employees in addition to their normal wages or salaries. ... A salary is a form of periodic payment from an employer to an employee, which is specified in an employment contract. ... A wage is the amount of money paid for some specified quantity of labour. ...

International

The International Labour Organization (ILO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations to deal with labour issues. ...

Australia

The Minister for Workplace Relations, Kevin Andrews, who introduced the Australian industrial relations legislation, speaking at a press conference on 8 November In May 2005 Workplace Relations Minister Kevin Andrews announced that the Howard Government would seek to introduce a series of proposed changes to Australian industrial relations law. ... The Australian Industrial Relations Commission (AIRC) is a tribunal established under the Workplace Relations Act 1996 (Cth). ... An Australian Workplace Agreement (AWA) is an individual contract on wages and working conditions between an employer and employee in Australia, under the Workplace Relations Act 1996. ...

United Kingdom

A Review Body in the United Kingdom is a government mechanism to replace collective bargaining for certain groups of employees in the public sector, for example doctors and nurses in the National Health Service. ...

United States of America

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent agency of the United States Government charged with conducting elections for union representation and with investigating and remedying unfair labor practices. ... The National Labor Relations Act (or Wagner Act) is a 1935 United States federal law that protects the rights of most workers in the private sector to organize labor unions, to engage in collective bargaining, and to take part in strikes and other forms of concerted activity in support of...

External links

  • Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School
  • National Labor Relations Board: http://www.nlrb.gov
  • Pennsylvania State University Labor and Industrial Relations Program: http://lsir.la.psu.edu/
  • Cornell University Industrial and Labor Relations School: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/
  • Michigan State University School of Labor and Industrial Relations: http://www.lir.msu.edu/
  • University of Illinois Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations: http://www.ilir.uiuc.edu
  • University of Minnesota Industrial Relations Center: http://www.irc.csom.umn.edu/index.aspx
  • Society for Human Resource Management: http://www.shrm.org
  • Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology: http://www.siop.org
  • Queen's University Centre for Industrial Relations http://www.industrialrelationscentre.com

The crest of Harvard Law School is drawn from the Royall coat of arms Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ...

References

  • Iversen, Torben. 1996. Power, Flexibility, and the Breakdown of Centralized Wage Bargaining: Denmark and Sweden in Comparative Perspective. Comparative Politics 28, no. 4 (July): 399-436.
  • Jochem, Sven. 2000. Nordic Labour Market Policies in Transition. West European Politics 23, issue 3 (July): 115-(?).
  • Thelen, Kathleen. 1993. West European Labor in Transition: Sweden and Germany Compared. World Politics 46, no. 1 (October): 23-49.
  • Turner, Lowell. 1998. Fighting for Partnership: Labor and Politics in Unified Germany. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Labor relations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (344 words)
The field of labor relations looks at the relationship between management and workers, particularly groups of workers represented by a labor union.
Labor relations is an important factor in analyzing "varieties of capitalism", such as neocorporatism (or corporatism), social democracy, and neoliberalism (or liberalism).
Labor relations can take place on many levels, such as the "shop-floor", the regional level, and the national level.
Labor Relations (854 words)
The Office of Labor Relations (OLR) was created on September 16, 2002 and is dedicated to providing the highest standard of excellence and cooperation between Employees and Management.
OLR is committed to improving communications between representatives of labor and management, assisting employees and management with conflict resolution and providing employees and management with the opportunities to learn and explore implement innovative and cooperative joint approaches to organizational effectiveness.
Labor Relations attended a majority of Budget Advisory Committee meetings and has developed a strong partnership with its members as a method in assisting the City with collective bargaining efforts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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