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Encyclopedia > Labor Day
Labor Day
Observed by United States
Type Federal Holiday (Federal Government, DC and US Territories); and State Holiday (in all 50 US States)
Date First Monday in September
2008 date September 1, 2008
2009 date September 7, 2009

Labor Day is a United States federal holiday observed on the first Monday in September. The holiday originated in 1882 from a desire by the Central Labor Union to create "a day off for the working man". Parades and pro-union demonstrations were central to the holiday at least through the time of World War I. This article is about annual labour observances internationally. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... In the United States, a Federal holiday is a holiday recognized by the United States Government. ... The Central Labor Union of New York, Brooklyn, and New Jersey was an early trade union organization that later broke up into various locals which are now AFL-CIO members. ...


Today, Labor Day is celebrated by most Americans as the symbolic end of the summer (which symbolically begins on Memorial Day). Congress made Labor Day a federal holiday in 1894.[1] All fifty states have also made it a state holiday. An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is...


Canada and Bermuda also observe their own 'Labour' Day holidays on the first Monday in September.

Contents

Culture

Labor Day has been celebrated on the first Monday in September in the United States since the 1880s. The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take were outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public "the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations" of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civil significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.


Today Labor Day is often regarded simply as a day of rest and, compared to the May 1 Labor Day celebrations in most countries, parades, speeches or political demonstrations are more low-key, although especially in election years, events held by labor organizations often feature political themes and appearances by candidates for office. Forms of celebration include picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays, water sports, and public art events. Families with school-age children take it as the last chance to travel before the end of summer. Some teenagers and young adults view it as the last weekend for parties before returning to school. However, of late, schools have begun well before Labor Day, as early as the 24th of July in many urban districts, including Nashville and Atlanta. In addition, Labor Day marks the beginning of the season for the National Football League and NCAA College Football. The NCAA usually plays their first games the weekend of Labor day, with the NFL playing their first game the Thursday following Labor Day. This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... Friends and family gather for a picnic in a public park in Columbus, Ohio, c. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 A fireworks event (fireworks display, fireworks show) is a spectacular display of the effects produced by firework devices on various occasions. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Young Men” redirects here. ... Students in Rome, Italy. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ...


Controversies

The Knights of Labor organized the original parade on Tuesday, September 5, 1882 in New York City. In 1884 another parade was held, and the Knights passed resolutions to make this an annual event. Other labor organizations (and there were many), but notably the affiliates of the International Workingmen's Association, many of whom were socialists or anarchists, favored a May 1 holiday. In 1886 came the general strike which eventually won the eight-hour workday in the United States. These events are today commemorated as Labor Day in virtually every country in the world, with the notable exceptions being the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. With the Chicago Haymarket riots in early May of 1886, President Grover Cleveland believed that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the riots. Thus, fearing that it might strengthen the socialist movement, he quickly moved in 1887 to support the position of the Knights of Labor and their date for Labor Day. Knights of Labor seal The Knights of Labor, also known as Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor, was founded by seven Philadelp tailors in 1869, led by Uriah S. Stephens. ... United States Marines on parade. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The International Workingmens Association (IWA), sometimes called the First International, was an international socialist organization which aimed at uniting a variety of different left-wing political groups and trade union organizations that were based on the working class and class struggle. ... Religious socialism Key Issues People and organizations Related subjects Socialism refers to a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A general strike is a strike action by an entire labour force in a city, region or country. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... On May 1, 1886 (on May Day), labor unions organized a strike for an eight hour work day in Chicago, Illinois, United States. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Knights of Labor seal The Knights of Labor, also known as Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor, was founded by seven Philadelp tailors in 1869, led by Uriah S. Stephens. ...


Labor Day traditions

Since 1966, the annual telethon of the Muscular Dystrophy Association has been held on Labor Day weekend. The telethon, hosted by Jerry Lewis, raises tens of millions of dollars each year to fund research and patient support programs for the various diseases grouped as muscular dystrophy. The Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon is hosted by Jerry Lewis to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. ... Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) is a U.S. organization founded in 1950 which combats muscular dystrophy and diseases of the nervous system and muscular system in general by funding research, providing medical and community services, and educating health professionals and the general public. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). ... Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic, hereditary muscle diseases that cause progressive muscle weakness. ...


Labor Day weekend also marked the annual running of the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, South Carolina. The race was run at any time during the weekend from 1950-2002. In 2004, NASCAR began racing on Labor Day weekend at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California. The Mountain Dew Southern 500 is a 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup race. ... Darlington Raceway during the 2006 Dodge Charger 500. ... Darlington is a city in Darlington County, in northeastern South Carolina. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Location of Fontana in California Coordinates: , Country State County San Bernardino Incorporated (city) 1952-06-25 [2] Government  - Mayor Mark Nuaimi [1] Area  - City  36. ...


Chicago's Taste of Polonia, The city's largest Polish themed festival celebration of Polish cultural heritage, traditions, and customs on the grounds of the Copernicus Foundation in Jefferson Park. Bringing in crowds well over 30,000 each year, Taste of Polonia has welcomed notable guests such as President George H. Bush in 1992 and Vice-President Dick Cheney, Mrs. Tipper Gore, and Mrs. Hadassah Lieberman in 2000[2]. For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Taste of Polonia is a Chicago neighborhood festival held at the Copernicus Cultural and Civic Center in the Jefferson Park community area of Chicago in Cook County, Illinois, United States every Labor Day weekend since 1979. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Copernicus Foundation (referred to in Polish as Fundacja Kopernikowska) is a 501(c)(3) not for profit organization based in the Jefferson Park area of Chicago, Illinois. ... Jefferson Park located on the northwest side of Chicago, USA, is one of 77 officially designated Chicago community areas. ... For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... Order: 41st President Term of Office: January 20, 1989–January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican Vice President: Dan Quayle George... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Mary Elizabeth Aitcheson Gore (born August 19, 1948), known as Tipper Gore, is the wife of former Vice President Al Gore and was the Second Lady of the United States from 1993 until 2001. ... Hadassah Lieberman (born Hadassah Freilich in the refugee camp of Prague, Czechoslovakia in Mar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Boomsday, one of the biggest fireworks displays in the Southeastern United States, has been held annually on Labor Day since 1986 in Knoxville, Tennessee; it attracts over 350,000 spectators. Boomsday is an annual fireworks celebration presented by the Knoxville Tourism and Sports Corporation in conjunction with the radio stations of Journal Broadcast Group (HOT 104. ... Knoxville redirects here. ...


Popular fashion etiquette dictates that white should not be worn after Labor Day.[3] Originally it was white shoes that were taboo— white or "winter white" clothing was acceptable.[4] The custom is fading: "Fashion magazines are jumping on this growing trend, calling people who 'dare' to wear white after Labor Day innovative, creative, and bold. Slowly but surely, white is beginning to break free from its box, and is becoming acceptable to wear whenever one pleases. This etiquette is comparable to the Canadian fashion rule against wearing green after Remembrance Day. In the world of western attire, it is similarly tradition to wear a straw cowboy hat until Labor Day. After Labor Day, the felt hat is worn until Memorial Day."[5] Remembrance Day also known as Poppy Day, Armistice Day (the event it commemorates), or Veterans Day in the United States is a day to commemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces and of civilians in times of war, specifically since the First World War. ...


References

  1. ^ U.S. DOL - The History of Labor Day
  2. ^ Copernicus Foundation page on the festival
  3. ^ "Ask Yahoo!", Yahoo!, 2002-09-13. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  4. ^ "White out? Tomorrow's Labor Day. So it's time for a fashion etiquette lesson", jacksonville.com, 2002-09-01. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  5. ^ "Wearing White After Labor Day: Fashion Disaster or Tired Tradition", The HillTop Online, 2002-09-10. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United States, a Federal holiday is a holiday recognized by the United States Government. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Inauguration Day 2005 of President George W. Bush on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol. ... Presidents Day (or Presidents Day), is the common name for the federal holiday officially designated as Linclon Birthday, and both variants are among the official names of a number of coinciding state holidays. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... Fourth of July redirects here. ... Columbus Day is a holiday celebrating the anniversary of Christopher Columbuss arrival in the Americas, which happened on the October 12, 1492 in the Julian calendar, or October 21, 1492 in the modern Gregorian calendar. ... For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... For the Canadian holiday, see Thanksgiving (Canada). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... Araw ng Kagitingan (Day of Valor in Filipino) is a national holiday in the Philippines which commemorates the fall of Bataan during World War II. It falls annually on April 9, and is observed on the Monday nearest that date. ... This article is about annual labour observances internationally. ... The Philippine Declaration of Independence occurred on June 12, 1898 in the Philippines where Filipino revolutionary forces under General Emilio Aguinaldo (later to become the Philippines first Republican President) proclaimed the sovereignty and independence of the Philippine Islands from the colonial rule of Spain after the latter was defeated at... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Heroes Day or National Heroes Day may refer to a number of commemorations of national heroes in different countries. ... Eid ul-Fitr or Id-Ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر ‘Īdu l-Fiṭr), often abbreviated to Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the holy month of fasting. ... This article is about the person Andrés Bonifacio. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... For places, institutions and objects named after this person, see Rizal (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. DOL - The History of Labor Day (764 words)
Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers.
Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.
Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.
Labor Day - History of the Observance of Labor Day (396 words)
Labor Day is a national legal holiday that is over 100 years old.
This date eventually became known as May Day, and was celebrated by Socialists and Communists in commemoration of the working man. In the U.S., the first Monday in September was selected to reject any identification with Communism.
In the late 1880's, labor organizations began to lobby various state legislatures for recognition of Labor Day as an official state holiday.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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