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Encyclopedia > Labiodental nasal
IPA – number 115
IPA – text ɱ
IPA – image {{{imagesize}}}
Entity ɱ
X-SAMPA F
Kirshenbaum M
Sound sample 

The labiodental nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ɱ, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is F. The IPA symbol is a lowercase letter m with a leftward hook protruding the from the lower right of the letter. Occasionally it is instead transcribed as an <m> with a dental diacritic: [m̪]. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... HTML has been in use since 1991 (note that the W3C international standard is now XHTML), but the first standardized version with a reasonably complete treatment of international characters was version 4. ... The Extended SAM Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA) is a variant of SAMPA developed in 1995 by John C. Wells, professor of phonetics at the University of London. ... Kirshenbaum, sometimes called ASCII-IPA, is a system used to represent the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in ASCII. It was developed for Usenet, notably the newsgroups sci. ... Image File history File links Labiodental_nasal. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The Extended SAM Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA) is a variant of SAMPA developed in 1995 by John C. Wells, professor of phonetics at the University of London. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ... Example of a letter with a diacritic A diacritical mark or diacritic, also called an accent, is a small sign added to a letter to alter pronunciation or to distinguish between similar words. ...


It is pronounced very similarly to the bilabial nasal [m], except instead of the lips touching each other, the lower lip touches the upper teeth. The position of the lips and teeth is generally the same as for the production of the other labiodental consonants, like [f] and [v], though closure is obviously incomplete for the fricatives. The bilabial nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa. ...


The labiodental nasal has not been confirmed to exist as a separate phoneme in any language. It has been reported from the Kukuya dialect of Teke, where it is "accompanied by strong protrusion of both lips". However, there is some doubt that a true stop can be made by this gesture (Ladefoged and Maddieson 1996: 18). In human language, a phoneme is the theoretical representation of a sound. ...


Nevertheless, it is extremely common phonetically, as it is the nearly universal allophone of /m/ (and sometimes /n/) before the labiodental fricatives [f] and [v], as in English comfort or circumvent. In phonetics, an allophone is one of several similar phones that belong to the same phoneme. ...

Contents

Features

Features of the labiodental nasal:

In linguistics, manner of articulation describes how the tongue, lips, and other speech organs involved in making a sound make contact. ... A stop, plosive, or occlusive is a consonant sound produced by stopping the airflow in the vocal tract. ... Places of articulation (passive & active): 1. ... In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa. ... For other uses, see Lip (disambiguation). ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... In phonetics, phonation is the use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ... A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ... A central or medial consonant is a consonant sound that is produced when air flows across the center of the mouth over the tongue. ... In phonetics, initiation is the action by which an air-flow is created through the vocal tract. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... The space between the vocal cords is called the glottis. ...

Occurrence

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Catalan canvi [ˈkaɱvi] 'change' See Catalan phonology
English symphony [ˈsɪɱfəni] 'symphony' See English phonology
Finnish informaatio [ˈiɱfo̞rˌmɑːt̪io̞] 'information' See Finnish phonology
Greek έμβρυο [ˈeɱvrio̞] 'embryo' See Modern Greek phonology
Gweno [ɱwiː] 'white/gray hair'
Italian invece [iɱˈvetʃe] 'on the contrary' See Italian phonology
Norwegian komfyr [kɔɱˈfyːɾ] 'stove' See Norwegian phonology
Spanish influencia [iɱˈflwensja] 'influence' See Spanish phonology
Swedish amfibie [aɱˈfiːˌbjɛ] 'amphibia' See Swedish phonology

Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia , and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... Phonological Features Several characteristic features of Catalan as a Romance language (SAMPA phonetic scheme used): Like Occitan, losing of Latin final unstressed vowels, except -A; and then after some of the resulting consonantic groups a support vowel [&#601;] appears. ... Phonological Features Several characteristic features of Catalan as a Romance language (SAMPA phonetic scheme used): Like Occitan, losing of Latin final unstressed vowels, except -A; and then after some of the resulting consonantic groups a support vowel [&#601;] appears. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... English orthography (or spelling), has relatively complicated rules when compared to other orthographic systems written with alphabetic scripts and contains many inconsistencies between spelling and pronunciation, necessitating rote learning for most people learning to read or write English. ... English phonology is the study of the phonology (ie the sound system) of the English language. ... The Finnish alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet, and especially its Swedish extension. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... This page presents a sketch of the phonology of Standard Modern Greek. ... The Italian alphabet is a variant of the Latin alphabet used by the Italian language. ... // Phonology Vowels Notes: In Italian there is no phonemic distinction between long and short vowels. ... The Danish and Norwegian alphabet consists of 29 letters: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z, Æ, Ø, Å The letter Å was introduced in Norwegian in 1917, replacing Aa. Similarly, Å was introduced in Danish... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Swedish alphabet consists of the following 28 letters: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, X, Y, Z, Å, Ä, Ö The main feature separating it from the Latin alphabet are the three additional vowels, Å, Ä and Ö. The... Swedish is notable for having a large vowel inventory, with 9 vowels that are distinguished in quality and to some degree quantity, making up 17 vowel phonemes, all of them being monophthongs. ...

Reference

Ladefoged, Peter, and Ian Maddieson (1996). Sounds of the World's Languages. Blackwells. Peter Nielsen Ladefoged (September 17, 1925 – January 24, 2006) was a British-American linguist phonetician who traveled the world to document the distinct sounds of endangered languages and pioneered ways to collect and study data. ... Ian Maddieson is a world-renowned linguist at UC Berkeley, the vice president of the International Phonetic Association. ...


See also

  Consonants (List, table) See also: IPA, Vowels  
Pulmonics Bilabial Lab'den. Dental Alveolar Postalv. Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyn. Epiglottal Glottal Non-pulmonics and other symbols
Nasals m ɱ n ɳ ɲ ŋ ɴ Clicks  ʘ ǀ ǃ ǂ ǁ
Plosives p b t d ʈ ɖ c ɟ k ɡ q ɢ ʡ ʔ Implo­­sives  ɓ ɗ ʄ ɠ ʛ
Fricatives  ɸ β f v θ ð s z ʃ ʒ ʂ ʐ ç ʝ x ɣ χ ʁ ħ ʕ ʜ ʢ h ɦ Ejec­­tives 
Approximants  β̞ ʋ ð̞ ɹ ɻ j ɰ Other laterals  ɺ ɫ
Trills ʙ r ʀ Co-articulated approximants  ʍ w ɥ
Flaps & Taps ѵ ɾ ɽ Co-articulated fricatives  ɕ ʑ ɧ
Lat. Fricatives ɬ ɮ Affricates  ʦ ʣ ʧ ʤ
Lat. Appr'mants l ɭ ʎ ʟ Co-articulated stops  k͡p ɡ͡b ŋ͡m
This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]
Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a voiced consonant. Shaded areas denote pulmonic articulations judged impossible.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Labiodental nasal - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (420 words)
The labiodental nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.
Nevertheless, it is extremely common phonetically, as it is the nearly universal allophone of /m/ (and sometimes /n/) before the labiodental fricatives [f] and [v], as in English comfort or circumvent.
Its place of articulation is labiodental which means it is articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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