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Encyclopedia > Laban (Bible)

Laban (Hebrew: לָבָן, Standard Lavan Tiberian Lāḇān ; "White") is the son of Bethuel, brother of Rebekah and the father of Leah and Rachel as described in the Book of Genesis. As such he is brother-in-law to Isaac and twice the father-in-law to Jacob. Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Bible, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early middle ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Bethuel (Hebrew for “house of God”), in the Hebrew Bible, was an Aramean man (Gen. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (רִבְקָה Captivating, Enchantingly Beautiful, Noose or Snare, Standard Hebrew Rivqa, Tiberian Hebrew Riḇqāh) is the wife of Isaac. ... Look up Leah, לֵאָה in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rachel (Hebrew: , Russian: , also spelled Rachael) Ewe, also innocence and gentility of a rose and may mean lovely. Standard Hebrew Raḥel, Tiberian Hebrew Rāḫēl, Rāḥēl) is the second and favorite wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph and Benjamin, first mentioned in the Book of Genesis of... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... It has been suggested that Ishaq be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Yaqub be merged into this article or section. ...


Laban first appears in the story in Genesis 24:29-60, where he is impressed by the gold jewelry given to his sister on behalf of Isaac, and plays a key part in arranging their marriage.


Much later, Laban promises his younger daughter Rachel to Jacob (Rebekah's son) in return for seven years' service, only to trick him into marrying his elder daughter Leah instead. Jacob then serves another seven years in exchange for the right to also marry his choice, Rachel, see Genesis 29.


Laban's flocks and fortunes increase under Jacob's skilled care, but there is much further trickery between them. Six years after his promised service has ended, Jacob, having prospered largely by proving more cunning than his father-in-law, finally leaves. Laban pursues him, but they eventually part on good terms, see Genesis 31.


Laban can be seen as symbolizing those whose concern for the welfare of their immediate family, nominally a virtue, is taken to the point where it interferes with God's Will. Laban's normal urge to ensure his older daughter not be left unmarried leads to the Exile in Egypt (see below); his anxiety over seeing his son-in-law throw away his family's comfortable position in Aramea in search of a risky new beginning back in Canaan leads him to oppose the return of the Children of Israel to the Promised Land. [1] His name can also be seen as symbolic in this matter; "White", the visual representation of purity, without visible stain, symbolizing those without apparent evil motives whose actions nevertheless result in undesirable outcomes. Predestination is a religious idea, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ... EXILE is a 6-member Japanese pop music band. ... For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... // The Children of Israel (Hebrew: בני ישראל Bnai Yisrael or Bnei Yisrael or Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel;) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... According to the Bible, the Land of Israel (Hebrew: Eretz Yisrael) was promised to the descendants of Hebrew patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob by God, making it the Promised land. ...


Laban and Passover

Laban is referenced significantly in the Passover Haggadah, in the context of the answer to the traditional child's question, "Why is this night different from all other nights?". The prescribed answer begins with a quote from Deuteronomy 26:5, "arami oved avi"; normally translated as "a wandering Aramean was my father", alluding to Abram, but here interpreted unusually as "arami ived avi", "an Aramean destroyed my father", as made clear by the rabbinical exegesis read in the Seder: Passover (Hebrew: פסח; transliterated as Pesach or Pesah), also called חג המצות (Chag HaMatzot - Festival of Matzot) is a Jewish holiday which is celebrated in the spring. ... Haggadah for Passover, 14th century Haggadah in Hebrew means Telling. ... Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. ... The term Aram can refer to: Aram (אֲרָם or ), the fifth semite grandson of Noah, in the Book of Genesis. ... Abram is a village in the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, Greater Manchester, England. ... Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbī;; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbī) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished, (in knowledge). In the ancient Judean schools (and among Sefaradim today) the sages... The Seder (pronounced say-der, meaning order in Hebrew) is a special Jewish ceremonial dinner revolving around the story of Exodus. ...

Come and learn what Laban the Aramean sought to do our father Jacob. For Pharaoh issued his edict against only the males, but Laban sought to uproot all, as it is said, 'An Aramean would have destroyed my father, and he went down to Egypt and he became there a nation, great, mighty and populous.'

The question of what the connection is between the apparently disjoint tales of Laban and Pharaoh is interpreted in several ways by rabbinical authorities.


Rabbi Azriel Hildesheimer explains in his Hukkat HaPesach that Laban was, in fact, the primum mobile of the entire Exile and Exodus saga. Rachel was Jacob's divinely intended wife and, had things progressed without disturbance, would have given birth to Joseph as Jacob's firstborn with rights of primogeniture. Jacob's favoring Joseph as his inheritor as the leader of the fledging nation of Israel would have been seen as perfectly normal and fitting, given the customs of the time, there would have been no older brothers who felt cheated and jealous, Joseph would not have been sold into slavery, and there would have been no need for Jacob's family to be sent to Egypt to unite with Joseph. Instead, Laban married Jacob to Leah first, causing Leah's sons to precede Joseph in birth order; so that they were justifiably outraged when their father seemed to violate societal norms by treating his youngest son as his inheritor, in preference to his older sons' natural and legal rights. In this way, Laban can be seen as "seeking to uproot all", by attempting to sever the family tree of the Patriarchs between Jacob and Joseph before the Children of Israel can become more than a single small family. Israel Azriel Hildesheimer (May 20, 1820 – July 12, 1899) was a German rabbi and leader of Orthodox Judaism. ... For the philosophical/theological concept of a prime mover (that is, a self-existent being that is the ultimate cause or mover of all things), see cosmological argument. ... EXILE is a 6-member Japanese pop music band. ... Exodus is the second book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Predestination is a religious idea, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Look up firstborn in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Example of family tree A family tree is generally the totality of ones ancestors, or more specifically, a chart used in genealogy to show the family connections between individuals, consisting of the individuals names (usually accompanied by dates, and often also places and occupations) connected by various types of... See Patriarchs (Bible) for details about Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob of the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. ... // The Children of Israel (Hebrew: בני ישראל Bnai Yisrael or Bnei Yisrael or Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel;) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ...


Devora Steinmetz, Assistant Professor of Talmud at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, points out that the story of Jacob and Laban also resonates with the covenant with Abraham, more frequently interpreted as applying to the Exodus: "your seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them and they shall afflict them… Afterward they shall come out with great wealth" (Genesis 15:13-16). Jacob lived in the strange land of Aram, served Laban, and was afflicted by him; then he left with great wealth and returned to the Promised Land. The story thus serves to reinforce one of the central messages of the Passover Haggadah; that the Old Testament cycle of exile, persecution and return recurs again and again, and links the observant Jew in the Diaspora to the Land of Israel. Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bÉ™rîṯ, Standard Hebrew bÉ™rit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah, the first book of the Tanakh and also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... NOTE: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh, but not Old Testament, because it does not recognize the New Testament as a continuation or completion of the Jewish bible. ... Look up Diaspora in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Laban (Bible) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (627 words)
Laban first appears in the story in Genesis 24:29-60, where he is impressed by the gold jewelry given to his sister on behalf of Isaac, and plays a key part in arranging their marriage.
Laban can be seen as symbolizing those whose concern for the welfare of their immediate family, nominally a virtue, is taken to the point where it interferes with God's Will.
Laban is referenced significantly in the Passover Haggadah, in the context of the answer to the traditional child's question, "Why is this night different from all other nights?".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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