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Encyclopedia > La Rochelle

Commune of La Rochelle



Location and Coat of arms
Rochelle is a female given name, (French meaning little rock). Rochelle may also refer to: United States Rochelle, Florida Rochelle, Georgia Rochelle, Illinois New Rochelle, New York Argentina Rochelle, Guillermo Rochelle (Everybody Hates Chris), the mother from the television series, Everybody Hates Chris. ... Personal photograph. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1804x1689, 163 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 516 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (881 × 1024 pixel, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): La Rochelle ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...

Location
Coordinates 46° 09' 37" N 01° 09' 00" W
Administration
Country France
Region Poitou-Charentes
Department Charente-Maritime (préfecture)
Arrondissement La Rochelle
Canton Chief town of 9 cantons
Intercommunality Communauté
d'agglomération
de La Rochelle
Mayor Maxime Bono
(2001-2008)
Statistics
Elevation 0 m–28 m
(avg. 4 m)
Land area¹ 28.43 km²
Population²
(2004)
78,000
 - Density 2,744/km² (2004)
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 17300/ 17000
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

La Rochelle is a city and commune of western France, and a seaport on the Bay of Biscay, a part of the Atlantic Ocean (population 78,000 in 2004). It is the préfecture (capital) of the Charente-Maritime département(17). The city is connected to the Île de Ré (island) by a 2.9 km bridge, completed in 1988. Its harbour opens into a protected strait, the Pertuis d'Antioche. Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Categories: Stub | Regions of France ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Charente-Maritime is a département on the west coast of France named after the Charente River. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The arrondissement of La Rochelle is an arrondissement of France, located in the Charente-Maritime département, in the Poitou-Charentes région. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... Map of the Bay of Biscay. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... Charente-Maritime is a département on the west coast of France named after the Charente River. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... The quays at Saint Martin en Ré. ÃŽle de Ré (formerly also ÃŽle de Rhé; in English Isle of Rhé) is an island off the west coast of France near La Rochelle, on the northern side of the Pertuis dAntioche strait. ... This article is about the edifice (including an index to articles on specific bridge types). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pertuis dAntioche is a strait on the Atlantic coast of Western France, located between the two islands ÃŽle de Ré and ÃŽle dOléron and the continental coast, between the cities of La Rochelle and the naval arsenal of Rochefort. ...

Contents

History

Antiquity

Coin of the Santones, 1st century BCE, Cabinet des Médailles.
Coin of the Santones, 1st century BCE, Cabinet des Médailles.

The area of La Rochelle was occupied in Antiquity by the Gaul tribe of the Santones, who gave their name to the nearby region of Saintonge and the city of Saintes. The Romans then occupied the area, where they developed salt production along the coast as well as wine production, which was then reexported throughout the Empire. Roman villas were found at Saint-Éloi and at Les Minimes, as well as salt evaporation ponds dating to the same period. Image File history File linksMetadata SantonCoinage. ... Image File history File linksMetadata SantonCoinage. ... Coin of the Santones, 1st century BCE, Cabinet des Médailles. ... Gold 20-stater of Eucratides I (175-150 BCE), the largest gold coin ever minted in Antiquity. ... Antiquity means different things: Generally it means ancient history, and may be used of any period before the Middle Ages. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Coin of the Santones, 1st century BCE, Cabinet des Médailles. ... Saintonge is a small region on the atlantic coast of France in the region of Poitou-Charentes (17- Charente-Maritime). ... Saintes is a town and commune in France, in the Charente-Maritime département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Entrance to Les Minimes harbour. ... San Francisco Bay salt ponds Salt evaporation pond in Ile de Ré, France. ...


Foundation

La Rochelle was founded during the 10th century, and became an important harbour from the 12th century. In 1137, Guillaume X, Duke of Aquitaine essentially made La Rochelle a free port and gave it the right to establish itself as a commune. Fifty years later Eleanor of Aquitaine upheld the communal charter promulgated by her father, and for the first time in France, a city mayor was named for La Rochelle, Guillaume de Montmirail. Guillaume was assisted in his responsibilities by 24 municipal magistrates, and 75 notables who had jurisdiction over the inhabitants. Under the communal charter, the city obtained many privileges, such as the right to mint its own coins, and to operate some businesses free of royal taxes, dispositions which would favour the development of the entrepreuneurial middle-class (bourgeoisie). As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. ... Defensive towers at San Gimignano, Tuscany, bear witness to the factional strife within communes. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (or Aliénor), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] – April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Guillaume de Montmirail was a French nobleman, who was elected the first mayor of La Rochelle in 1199. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The main activities of the city were in the areas of maritime commerce and trade, especially with England, the Netherlands and Spain. In 1196, wealthy bourgeois named Alexandre Auffredi sent a fleet of seven ships to Africa to tap the riches of the continent. He went bankrupt and went into poverty as he waited for the return of his ships, but they finally returned seven years later filled with riches. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Alexandre Auffredi was a wealthy bourgeois of the city of La Rochelle in France, who in 1196 sent a fleet of seven ships to Africa to tap the riches of the continent. ...


Until the 15th century, La Rochelle was to be the largest French harbour on the Atlantic coast, dealing mainly in wine and salt. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


Hundred Years War

The naval battle of La Rochelle.

The naval Battle of La Rochelle took place on 22 June 1372 during the Hundred Years War between a Castilian-French and an English fleet. The Spanish had 60 ships and the English 40. They also had more knights and men than the English. The French and Castilians decisively defeated the English, securing French control of the Channel for the first time since the Battle of Sluys in 1340. Image File history File links NavalBattleOfLaRochelle. ... Image File history File links NavalBattleOfLaRochelle. ... The Battle of La Rochelle was a naval engagement fought in 1372 between a Franco-Castilian and an English fleet. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In this year, the city of Aachen, Germany begins adding a Roman numeral Anno Domini date to a few of its coins. ... This article is in need of attention. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... Combatants Kingdom of England Kingdom of France Commanders Edward III of England Hugues Quiéret, Nicolas Béhuchet Strength 250 ships 190 ships Casualties Unknown 20 000 (Europe: A History by Norman Davies) Most ships captured The naval Battle of Sluys was fought on 24 June 1340 as one of...


Sieges of La Rochelle

During the Renaissance, La Rochelle adopted Protestant ideas, and from 1568 became a centre for the Huguenots. The city was besieged during the French Wars of Religion: Siege of La Rochelle (1572-1573). Under Henry IV the city enjoyed a certain freedom and prosperity until the 1620s, but the city entered in conflict with the central authority of the King Louis XIII, when cannon shots were exchanged on September 10, 1627 with Royal troops. This resulted in the Siege of La Rochelle in which Cardinal Richelieu blockaded the city for 14 months, until the city surrendered and lost its mayor and its privileges. The growing persecution of the Huguenots culminated with the revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV. Many Huguenots emigrated, founding such cities as New Rochelle in the vicinity of today's New York in 1689. Richelieu at the siege of La Rochelle. ... Richelieu at the siege of La Rochelle. ... Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642), was a French clergyman, noble, and statesman. ... Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle, Henri Motte, 1881. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... The French Wars of Religion were a series of conflicts fought between Catholics and Huguenots (Protestants) from the middle of the sixteenth century to the Edict of Nantes in 1598, including civil infighting as well as military operations. ... The Siege of La Rochelle was a military siege of the Huguenot-held city of La Rochelle by Catholic troops during the fourth phase of the French Wars of Religion (set off by the St. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle, Henri Motte, 1881. ... Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642), was a French clergyman, noble, and statesman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... New Rochelle is a city located in Westchester County in the US state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Year 1689 (MDCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


La Rochelle and the New World

La Rochelle harbour in 1762. Joseph Vernet. Musée de la Marine.
La Rochelle harbour in 1762. Joseph Vernet. Musée de la Marine.

The following period was a prosperous one, marked by intense exchanges with the New World (Nouvelle France in Canada, and the Antilles). La Rochelle became very active in triangular trade with the New World, dealing in the slave trade with Africa, sugar trade with plantations of the Antilles, and fur trade with Canada. This was a period of high artistic, cultural and architectural achievements for the city. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 501 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,235 × 1,399 pixels, file size: 859 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 501 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,235 × 1,399 pixels, file size: 859 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Claude Joseph Vernet (August 14, 1714 - December 3, 1789), French painter, was born at Avignon. ... Model of the French submarine Plongeur at the Musée national de la Marine, Paris. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The Antilles (the same in French; Antillas in Spanish; Antillen in Dutch) refers to the islands forming the greater part of the West Indies in the Caribbean Sea. ... An historic example of three way trade in the North Atlantic Triangular trade is a historical term indicating trade between three ports or regions. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sugar is perhaps one of the oldest and best known commodities in the world. ... A sugarcane plantation at Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, 2005 A plantation is a large tract of monoculture, as a tree plantation, a cotton plantation, a tea plantation or a tobacco plantation. ... The Antilles (the same in French; Antillas in Spanish; Antillen in Dutch) refers to the islands forming the greater part of the West Indies in the Caribbean Sea. ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ...


The city eventually lost its trade and prominence during the decades spanning the Seven Years' War, the French revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. During that period France lost many of the territorial possessions it had in the new World, and also saw a strong decrease in its sea power in the continuing conflicts with Britain, ultimately diminishing the role of such harbours as La Rochelle. Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... Naval warfare is combat in and on seas and oceans. ...


19th century

The 1863 submarine Plongeur
The 1863 submarine Plongeur

In 1864, the harbour of La Rochelle (area of the "Bassin à flot" behind the water locks), was the site for the maiden dive experiments of the first mechanically-powered submarine in the World, Plongeur, commanded by Marie-Joseph-Camille Doré, a native of La Rochelle.
Image File history File links Plongeur. ... Image File history File links Plongeur. ... The French submarine Plongeur, 1863 Plongeur (French for Diver) was a French submarine launched in 1863. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... The French submarine Plongeur, 1863 Plongeur (French for Diver) was a French submarine launched in 1863. ... Marie-Joseph-Camille Doré (1831- ) was a captain (Lieutenant de Vaisseau) in the French Navy in the 19th century. ...


Second World War

The La Rochelle submarine base (still standing) was used as a set for the movie Das Boot.

During the Second World War, Germany established a submarine naval base at La Pallice (the main port of La Rochelle), which became the setting for the movie Das Boot. The U-Boat scenes in the movie Raiders of the Lost Ark were also shot in La Rochelle. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (930x556, 73 KB) Summary http://mapage. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (930x556, 73 KB) Summary http://mapage. ... For the song Das Boot, see U96. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... For the song Das Boot, see U96. ... This article is about the film. ...


A German stronghold, La Rochelle was the last French city to be freed at the end of the War. A siege took place between September 12, 1944, and May 7, 1945, in which the stronghold, including the islands of and Oléron, was held by 20,000 German troops under a German vice-admiral. Following negotiations by the French Navy frigate captain Meyer, and the general German capitulation on May 7th, French troops entered La Rochelle on May 8th. is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The quays at Saint Martin en Ré. ÃŽle de Ré (formerly also ÃŽle de Rhé; in English Isle of Rhé) is an island off the west coast of France near La Rochelle, on the northern side of the Pertuis dAntioche strait. ... ÃŽle dOléron (English: Island of Oleron) is an island off the Atlantic coast of France (due west of Rochefort), on the southern side of the Pertuis dAntioche strait. ... The French Navy, officially called the National Navy (French: Marine Nationale) is the maritime arm of the French military. ...


Geography

Geology

The limestone cliffs around La Rochelle display the Jurassic geology of the area.
The limestone cliffs around La Rochelle display the Jurassic geology of the area.

The bedrock of La Rochelle and surrounding areas is composed of layers of limestone dating back to the Sequanian stage (upper Oxfordian stage) of the Jurassic period (circa 160 million years ago), when a large part of France was submerged. These rocks were formed by the accumulation of organisms falling on the seabed, where they solidified. This happened at the time dinosaurs were roaming the earth. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 541 KB) Photographie prise sur les bords de mer, à La Rochelle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 541 KB) Photographie prise sur les bords de mer, à La Rochelle. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... The Oxfordian is the first stage of the Late Jurassic Epoch. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ...


Many of these layers are visible in the white cliffs that border the sea, which encapsulate many small marine fossils. Layers of thick white rocks, formed during period of relatively warm seas, alternate with highly friable layers containing sands and remains of mud, formed during colder periods, and with layers containing various corals, that were formed during warmer, tropical times.[1] For other uses, see Fossil (disambiguation). ...


The limestone thus formed is of course traditionally used as the main building material throughout the region.


The area of La Pointe du Chay, about 5 kilometers from La Rochelle is a popular cliff area for leisurely archaeological surveys. The cliffs at La Pointe du Chay. ...


Climate

Although at the same latitude as Montreal in Canada or the Kuril islands in Russia, the area is quite warm throughout the year due to the influence of the Gulf Stream waters, and insolation is remarkably high, on a par with the French Riviera on the Mediterranean Southern coast of France. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... For the political history of the sovereignty conflict, see Kuril Islands dispute. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... Not to be confused with insulation. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...

Weather averages for La Rochelle, France
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Avg low (°C) 3,4 4,0 5,4 7,4 10,7 13,7 15,8 15,7 13,7 10,5 6,3 3,9 9,2
Avg high (°C) 8,5 9,9 12,1 14,7 17,9 21,3 23,8 23,5 21,8 18,0 12,6 9,2 16,1
Average (°C) 5,9 6,9 8,7 11,1 14,3 17,5 19,8 19,6 17,8 14,2 9,4 6,6 12,7
Insolation (h) 84 111 174 212 239 272 305 277 218 167 107 85 2250
Precipitation (mm) 82,5 66,1 57,0 52,7 61,1 42,9 35,1 46,4 56,5 81,6 91,8 81,8 755,3

Demographics

La Rochelle population by year
1821 1831 1836 1841 1846 1851 1856 1861
12 327 14 629 14 857 16 720 17 465 16 507 16 175 18 904
1866 1872 1876 1881 1886 1891 1896 1901
18 710 19 506 19 583 22 464 23 829 26 808 28 376 31 559
1906 1911 1921 1926 1931 1936 1945 1954
33 858 36 371 39 770 41 521 45 043 47 737 48 923 58 799
1962 1968 1975 1982 1990 1999 2004
66 590 73 347 75 367 75 840 71 094 76 584 78 000

Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Today

Panoramic picture of the harbour towers at night.

The city has beautifully maintained its past architecture, making it one of the most picturesque and historically rich cities on the Atlantic coast. This helped develop a strong tourism industry. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 123 pixelsFull resolution (9632 × 1480 pixel, file size: 6. ...

The industrial harbour of La Pallice, as seen from the bridge to Ile de Ré.
The industrial harbour of La Pallice, as seen from the bridge to Ile de Ré.

La Rochelle possesses a commercial harbour in deep water, named La Pallice. The large submarine bunker built during World War II still stands there, although it is not being used. La Pallice is equipped with oil unloading equipment, and mainly handles tropical wood. It is also the location of the fishing fleet, which was moved from the old harbour at the center of the city during the 1980s. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1409x375, 53 KB) Summary La Pallice, the commercial harbour of La Rochelle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1409x375, 53 KB) Summary La Pallice, the commercial harbour of La Rochelle. ... La Pallice is the industrial harbour of the city of La Rochelle, France. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Catamarans docked at Les Minimes marina.
Catamarans docked at Les Minimes marina.

La Rochelle also maintains strong links with the sea by harbouring the largest marina for pleasure boats in Europe at Les Minimes, and a rather rich boat-building industry. Image File history File links Les Minimes harbour in La Rochelle. ... Image File history File links Les Minimes harbour in La Rochelle. ... Two Hobie catamarans, showing the typical Hobie raised platform joining the two hulls, and tall mast. ... Entrance to Les Minimes harbour. ... Entrance to Les Minimes harbour. ...


La Rochelle has a very big aquarium.


The Calypso, the ship used by Jacques-Yves Cousteau as a mobile laboratory for oceanography, and which was sunk after a collision in the port of Singapore (1996) is now displayed (sadly rotting) at the Maritime Museum of La Rochelle. Calypso is the name of a ship that Jacques-Yves Cousteau, one of the most important researchers in oceanography, equipped as a mobile laboratory for field research. ... Jacques-Yves Cousteau in 1976. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


One of the biggest music festivals in France, "FrancoFolies," takes place each summer in La Rochelle, where Francophone musicians come together for a week of concerts and celebration. 2004 marked the 20th anniversary of this event.


La Rochelle is the setting for the best-selling series of French language textbooks in the UK, titled Tricolore. The central character, Martine Domme, lives with her family at the fictional address of 12, Rue de la République. French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Three textbooks. ... The term tricolore can refer to: the Flag of France (in French, le drapeau tricolore or, rarely, le tricolore) the Flag of Italy (in Italian: il tricolore) the Flag of Romania (in Romanian: tricolorul) the Flag of Russia (in Russian: триколор) a tricolour banner or flag which has three colours, usually...

Panorama of La Pallice industrial harbour, seen from Île de Ré.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 74 pixelsFull resolution‎ (5,530 × 511 pixels, file size: 358 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Tourism

Harbour towers at night.
Harbour towers at night.

La Rochelle's main feature is the "Vieux Port" ("Old Harbour"), which is at the heart of the city, picturesque and lined with seafood restaurants. The city walls are open to an evening promenade. The old town has been well-preserved. From the harbour, boating trips can be taken to the Île d'Aix and Fort Boyard (home to the internationally famous tv show of the same name). Nearby Île de Ré is a short drive to the North. The countryside of the surrounding Charente-Maritime is very rural and full of history (Saintes). To the North is Venise Verte, a marshy area of country, criss-crossed with tiny canals and a popular resort for inland boating. Inland is the country of Cognac and Pineau. Image File history File links La_rochelle_de_nuit. ... Image File history File links La_rochelle_de_nuit. ... The island of Aix, as seen from Fort Boyard. ... Fort Boyard is a fort located between in the île dAix and île dOléron in the Pertuis dAntioche straights, on the west coast of France. ... The quays at Saint Martin en Ré. ÃŽle de Ré (formerly also ÃŽle de Rhé; in English Isle of Rhé) is an island off the west coast of France near La Rochelle, on the northern side of the Pertuis dAntioche strait. ... Saintes is a town and commune in France, in the Charente-Maritime département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... The Marais Poitevin, also known as Venise Verte is a marsh region in Western France, a remnant of the former Gulf of Poitou. ... Cognac is a commune in the French département of Charente, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Pineau des Charentes, (Pineau Charentais, or simply Pineau) is an alcoholic aperitif drink, made from a mix of unfermented grape juice, and Cognac brandy or eau de vie. ...


Famous people born in La Rochelle

Botanist Aimé Bonpland.
Botanist Aimé Bonpland.
Admiral Guy-Victor Duperré (1775-1846).
Admiral Guy-Victor Duperré (1775-1846).
Jean-Loup Chrétien.
Jean-Loup Chrétien.

Image File history File links Reaumur_1683-1757. ... Image File history File links Reaumur_1683-1757. ... René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (856x1070, 1125 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: John Theophilus Desaguliers ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (856x1070, 1125 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: John Theophilus Desaguliers ... John Theophilus Desaguliers (13 March 1683 – 29 February 1744) was a natural philosopher born in France. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (738 × 1106 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (738 × 1106 pixel, file size: 1. ... Aimé Jacques Alexandre Bonpland (August 22, 1773 - May 4, 1858) was a French explorer and botanist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Guy-Victor Duperré (February 20, 1775–November 2, 1846) was a French admiral. ... Download high resolution version (1658x2000, 715 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1658x2000, 715 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... William-Adolphe Bouguereau, self-portrait (1886). ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Spationaut Jean-Loup Chrétien Jean-Loup J.M. Chrétien, retired Général de Brigade (brigadier general) of the Armée de lAir (French air force), spationaut on several Franco-Soviet space missions, and former NASA mission specialist. ... Aimé Jacques Alexandre Bonpland (August 22, 1773 - May 4, 1858) was a French explorer and botanist. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Alexandre Auffredi was a wealthy bourgeois of the city of La Rochelle in France, who in 1196 sent a fleet of seven ships to Africa to tap the riches of the continent. ... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... Events January 7 - Pius V becomes Pope Selim II succeeds Suleiman I as Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Religious rioting in the Netherlands signifies the beginning of the Eighty Years War in the Netherlands. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii, one of the popular destinations for windsurfing. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Arabs, 1871 Un Souvenir dEsneh, 1876 Eugène Fromentin (December, 1820 - August 27, 1876) was a French painter and writer. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fabrice Neaud Fabrice Neaud (b. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... The Académie française In the French educational system an académie LAcadémie française, or the French Academy, is the pre-eminent French learned body on matters pertaining to the French language. ... Jan. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Gédéon Tallemant, Sieur Des Réaux (7 November 1619 - 6 November 1692), was a French writer known for his Historiettes, a collection of short biographies. ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Guy Laroche, French fashion designer (born in La Rochelle, France, 1921 — died 1989), and founder of the eponymous company. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Guy-Victor Duperré (February 20, 1775–November 2, 1846) was a French admiral. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Pair de France (Peer of France) is the French title of the Peers who held a lay or ecclesiastical fief of high rank, known as pairie, of the Kingdom of France, a rather different institution than the British peerage. ... The church at the Invalides, with its dome Les Invalides in Paris, France consists of a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement, now containing museums and monuments, all relating to Frances military history, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the buildings... This article is about the monument in Paris. ... Jacques Nicolas Billaud-Varenne (April 23, 1756 - June 3, 1819) was a French revolutionary. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... August 12 - The Treaty of Nöteborg between Sweden and Novgorod (Russia) is signed, regulating the border for the first time Canonization of Saint Thomas Aquinas Lithuania: in Letters of Gediminas, Vilnius is named as the capital city Pharos of Alexandria Lighthouse (one of the Seven Wonders of the world... Events December 16 - Emperor Go-Kameyama of Japan abdicates in favor of rival claimant Go-Komatsu, ending the nanboku-cho period of competing imperial courts James of Jülich is boiled alive for pretending to be a bishop and ordaining his own priests Korean founder of the Joseon Dynasty General... Jean Duvignaud (1921-2007) was a French novelist and sociologist. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Jean Guiton (1585–1654) was born in La Rochelle where he followed the occupation of ship-owner. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. ... Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle, Henri Motte, 1881. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Spationaut Jean-Loup Chrétien Jean-Loup J.M. Chrétien, retired Général de Brigade (brigadier general) of the Armée de lAir (French air force), spationaut on several Franco-Soviet space missions, and former NASA mission specialist. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Baptiste Élissalde (born 23 November 1977 in La Rochelle, France)is a French rugby union footballer. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Stade Toulousain usually known as Toulouse is a French rugby union club from the countrys rugby capital, Toulouse in Midi-Pyrénées. ... First international  France 8–38 New Zealand  (1 January 1906) Largest win  Brazil 7–99 France  (2 June 1974) Worst defeat  New Zealand 61–10 France  (9 June 2007) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Losing finalist, 1987, 1999 The France national rugby union team represents France... Jean-Pierre Élissalde (born December 31, 1953 in La Rochelle) was a French rugby union player at scrum half and in 2005 was appointed the first foreign head coach of the Japan national rugby union team. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... First international  France 8–38 New Zealand  (1 January 1906) Largest win  Brazil 7–99 France  (2 June 1974) Worst defeat  New Zealand 61–10 France  (9 June 2007) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Losing finalist, 1987, 1999 The France national rugby union team represents France... John Theophilus Desaguliers (13 March 1683 – 29 February 1744) was a natural philosopher born in France. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... Year 1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... This article is about the profession. ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The French submarine Plongeur, 1863 Plongeur (French for Diver) was a French submarine launched in 1863. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Nicolas Gargot de La Rochette was Governor of Plaisance (Placentia), Newfoundland in 1660. ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... Placentia is the name of some places in the world: Placentia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada Placentia, California, United States of America The Palace of Placentia was a royal palace in Greenwich, London Piacenza in Italy was formerly called Placentia in Latin and English Placencia de las Armas and Plentzia are... French prime minister Paul Ramadier Paul Ramadier (March 17, 1888 - October 14, 1961) was a prominent French Socialist politician of the Third and Fourth Republics. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Croix de Lorraine, the symbol of the resistance chosen by de Gaulle French Resistance is the name used for resistance movements during World War II which fought the Nazi German occupation of France and the collaborationist Vichy regime. ... Year 1407 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... William-Adolphe Bouguereau, self-portrait (1886). ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...

Famous people who lived in La Rochelle

Alcide Charles Victor Marie Dessalines dOrbigny (September 6, 1802 - June 30, 1857) was a great French naturalist. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Colette Besson (born April 7, 1946 in Saint-Georges-de-Didonne (Charente-Maritime) – died August 9, 2005 in La Rochelle) was a former French athlete, the surprise winner of the 400 m at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. ... David McGowan (born 2 February 1988 in Glasgow) is a Scottish football midfielder currently playing for Clyde. ...

Sport

Stade Rochelais is a French rugby union club currently competing in the second level of the French league system, (Pro D2). ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...

Notes

  1. ^ Source: La Rochelle touristic board at the "Pointe du Chay"

See also

  • Poitevin-Saintongeais language

Poitevin (Poetevin) is a language spoken by the people in Poitou. ...

Gallery

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
La Rochelle
  • City council website
  • La Rochelle News
  • Visiting La Rochelle (English with PDF map and photos)
  • Webpage about the fortifications
  • Focus on La Rochelle
  • Chinese researchers and students in La Rochelle
  • Ile d'oleron (near of La Rochelle)
  • Photos of La Rochelle Discovering La Rochelle with pictures...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: La Rochelle (917 words)
UÇON) was transferred on 7 May, 1648, to La Rochelle, which diocese just, previous to the Revolution, aside from the territory of the former Bishop of Maillezais, included the present arrondissements of Marennes, Rochefort, La Rochelle, and a part of Saint-Jean d'Angély.
Louis of France is the titular saint of the cathedral of La Rochelle and the patron of the city.
From 1534 La Rochelle and the Province of Aunis were a centre of Calvinism.
La Rochelle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1487 words)
La Rochelle is a city and commune of western France, and a seaport on the Atlantic Ocean (population 76,584 in 1999).
La Rochelle was founded during the 10th century, and became an important harbour from the 12th century.
The bedrock of La Rochelle and surrounding areas is composed of layers of limestone dating back to the Sequanian stage (upper Oxfordian stage) of the Jurassic period (circa 160 million years ago), when a large part of France was submerged.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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