FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > La Marseillaise
La Marseillaise
English: The Song of Marseille
Rouget de Lisle, Composer of the Marseillaise, sings it for the first time.
Rouget de Lisle, Composer of the Marseillaise, sings it for the first time.
National Anthem of Flag of France France
Lyrics Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle, 1792
Music Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle, 1792
Adopted 1795

"La Marseillaise" (IPA[la maʁ.sɛ.ˡjɛz]; in English The Song of Marseille) is the national anthem of France. This article is about the monument in Paris. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Image File history File links Rouget de Lisle, Composer of the Marseillaise, sings it for the first time. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Rouget de Lisle, Composer of the Marseillaise, sings it for the first time. ... Rouget de Lisle, Composer of the Marseillaise, sings it for the first time. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...

Contents

History

"La Marseillaise" is a song written and composed by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle in Strasbourg on April 25, 1792. Its original name was "Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin" ("War Song for the Army of the Rhine") and it was dedicated to Marshal Nicolas Luckner, a Bavarian-born French officer from Cham. It became the rallying call of the French Revolution and received its name because it was first sung on the streets by volunteers (fédérés) from Marseille upon their arrival in Paris after a young volunteer from Montpellier called François Mireur had sung it at a patriotic gathering in Marseilles. A freshly graduated medical doctor, Mireur later became a general with Bonaparte and died in Egypt at 28. This article is about the musical composition. ... Rouget de Lisle, Composer of the Marseillaise, sings it for the first time. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Niklaus, Count Luckner ( 1722 - 1794), Marshal of France, originated in Cham in eastern Bavaria, and joined the French military in 1763. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Cham ([ka:m]) is a city in the east of the federal state Bavaria, Germany. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... The term fédérés (sometimes translated to English as federates) most commonly refers to the troops who volunteered for the French National Guard in the summer of 1792 during the French Revolution. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... This article is about the capital of France. ... Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ...


Music was adapted from "Variazioni sulla Marsigliese per violino e orchestra" written by the Italian composer Giovanni Battista Viotti in 1784. Giovanni Battista Viotti (May 12, 1755 - March 3, 1824) was an Italian violinist and composer. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Its lyrics are heavily oriented toward Prussian and Austrian armies which were attacking France at the time (Strasbourg itself was attacked just a few days after). The Battle of Valmy turned the tables. Combatants France Prussia Commanders Dumouriez, Kellermann Duke of Brunswick Strength 47,000 35,000 Casualties 300 184 The Battle of Valmy (or Cannonade of Valmy) was fought on 20 September 1792, during the French Revolutionary Wars, around the village of Valmy in northern France. ...


The Marseillaise was screamed during the Levée en Masse and met with huge success. The Levée en Masse allowed it to become famous across all of France. Levée en masse (literally Mass uprising) is a French term for mass conscription. ...

Général Mireur, 1770-1798, anonymous, terra cotta, Faculty of Medecine, Montpellier, France.
Général Mireur, 1770-1798, anonymous, terra cotta, Faculty of Medecine, Montpellier, France.

The Convention accepted it as the French national anthem in a decree passed on Bastille Day, 1795, but it was then banned successively by Napoleon I, Louis XVIII, and Napoleon III, only being reinstated briefly after the July Revolution of 1830 and then permanently in 1879.[1] During Napoleon III's reign Partant pour la Syrie was the unofficial anthem of the regime. Thi article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... Partant pour la Syrie (Departing for Syria) is a French song the music of which was written by Hortense de Beauharnais and the text by Alexandre de Laborde in or about 1807. ...


Re-arrangements

During French Revolution, Giuseppe Cambini published Patriotic airs for two violins, where the song is quoted literally and as a variation theme, with other patriotic songs. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Giuseppe Maria Gioacchino Cambini (February 13?, 1746 - 1825?) Italian composer and violinist. ...


Mozart piano concerto n° 25 (KV 503), composed a few years before, in 1786, was probably an inspiration for Rouget de Lisle, as the first 12 notes of the anthem are played at the end of the first movement allegro maestoso (16th-17th minutes).


"La Marseillaise" was re-arranged by Hector Berlioz about 1830. Lithograph of Berlioz by August Prinzhofer, Vienna, 1845. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Robert Schumann, while setting some Heinrich Heine poems to music, used part of the Marseillaise for Heine's "The Two Grenadiers" poem at the end of the piece when the old French soldier dies (Opus 49, No.1). Wagner also quotes from the Marseillaise in his setting of a French translation of the poem. Schumann also incorporated the Marseillaise as a major motif in his overture, 'Hermann und Dorothea' inspired by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. For other persons named Robert Schumann, see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (December 13, 1797 – February 17, 1856) was a journalist, an essayist, and one of the most significant German romantic poets. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Goethe redirects here. ...


Liszt also wrote a piano transcription of the anthem. Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a virtuoso pianist and composer. ... A piano transcription is a piece of music played on one or more pianos that is an approximation of a source piece of music. ...


In 1882, Pyotr Tchaikovsky used extensive notes from the Marseillaise to represent the invading French army in his 1812 Overture. This was an anachronism, as the Marseillaise was the French anthem in Tchaikovsky's day, but not Napoleon's. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg and the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow were built to commemorate the Russian victory against Napoleon. ... The 1812 Overture (full title: Festival Overture The Year 1812 in E flat major, Op. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


Edward Elgar quoted the opening of La Marseillaise in his choral work The Music Makers, based on Arthur O'Shaughnessy's Ode, at the line "We fashion an empire's glory", where he also quotes the opening phrase of Rule, Britannia!. Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... The Music Makers, op. ... Arthur William Edgar OShaughnessy (March 14, 1844–January 30, 1881) was a British poet, born in London. ... Rule, Britannia! is a British patriotic song, originating from the poem Rule, Britannia by James Thomson and set to music by Thomas Arne in 1740. ...


Serge Gainsbourg recorded a reggae version in 1978. Serge Gainsbourg (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a French poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ...


Henrik Wergeland wrote a Norwegian version of the song in 1831, called The Norwegian Marseillaise. Henrik Wergeland Henrik Wergeland (June 17, 1808–July 12, 1845) was a Norwegian poet and prose writer, born in Kristiansand. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Lyrics

Note only the first verse (and sometimes the fifth and sixth) and the first chorus are sung today in France. There are some slight historical variations in the lyrics of the song; the following is the version listed at official website of the French Presidency[2]

  • FP National anthem (MP3 audio file).


For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ...

La Marseillaise

Allons enfants de la Patrie, Arise, children of the Fatherland,
Le jour de gloire est arrivé ! The day of glory has arrived!
Contre nous de la tyrannie, Against us, tyranny's
L'étendard sanglant est levé. (bis) Bloody banner is risen. (repeat)
Entendez-vous dans les campagnes Do you hear in the countryside
Mugir ces féroces soldats ? These ferocious soldiers howling?
Ils viennent jusque dans nos bras They are coming into your arms
Égorger nos fils, nos compagnes ! To cut the throats of your sons, your wives!
 
Aux armes, citoyens ! To arms, citizens!
Formez vos bataillons ! Form your battalions!
Marchons, marchons ! Let's march, let's march!
Qu'un sang impur May impure blood
Abreuve nos sillons ! Water our furrows!
Aux armes, citoyens ! To arms, citizens!
Formons nos bataillons ! Let us form our battalions!
Marchons, marchons ! Let us march, let us march!
Qu'un sang impur May impure blood
Abreuve nos sillons ! Water our furrows!
 
Que veut cette horde d'esclaves, What does this horde of slaves want,
De traîtres, de rois conjurés ? From Traitors and conspirating kings?
Pour qui ces ignobles entraves For whom these vile chains
Ces fers dès longtemps préparés ? (bis) These long-prepared irons? (repeat)
Français, pour nous, ah ! quel outrage, Frenchmen, for us, ah! What an insult,
Quels transports il doit exciter ! What fury it must arouse!
C'est nous qu'on ose méditer It is us one dares plan
De rendre à l'antique esclavage ! To return to the old slavery!
 
Aux armes, citoyens... To arms, citizens...
 
Quoi ! des cohortes étrangères What! These foreign cohorts!
Feraient la loi dans nos foyers ! Would make laws in our homes!
Quoi ! ces phalanges mercenaires What! These mercenary phalanxes
Terrasseraient nos fiers guerriers ! (bis) Would cut down our proud warriors! (repeat)
Grand Dieu ! par des mains enchaînées Good Lord! By chained hands
Nos fronts sous le joug se ploieraient Our fronts would yield under the yoke
De vils despotes deviendraient The vile despots would become
Les maîtres de nos destinées ! The masters of our destinies!
 
Aux armes, citoyens... To arms, citizens...
 
Tremblez, tyrans et vous perfides Tremble, tyrants and traitors
L'opprobre de tous les partis The shame of all good men
Tremblez ! vos projets parricides Tremble! Your parricidal schemes
Vont enfin recevoir leurs prix ! (bis) Will receive their just reward! (repeat)
Tout est soldat pour vous combattre Against you, we are all soldiers
S'ils tombent, nos jeunes héros, If our young heroes fall,
La terre en produit de nouveaux, The earth will bear new ones,
Contre vous tout prêts à se battre ! Ready to join the fight against you!
 
Aux armes, citoyens... To arms, citizens...
 
Français, en guerriers magnanimes, Frenchmen, as magnanimous warriors,
Portez ou retenez vos coups ! Bear or hold back your blows!
Épargnez ces tristes victimes Spare these sad victims
À regret s'armant contre nous (bis) Who are regretfully taking up arms against us (repeat)
Mais ces despotes sanguinaires But not these bloody despots
Mais ces complices de Bouillé These accomplices of Bouillé
Tous ces tigres qui, sans pitié, All these tigers who mercilessly
Déchirent le sein de leur mère ! Ripped out their mother's breast!
 
Aux armes, citoyens... To arms, citizens...
 
Amour sacré de la Patrie, Sacred patriotic love,
Conduis, soutiens nos bras vengeurs Lead and support our avenging arms
Liberté, Liberté chérie, Liberty, cherished liberty,
Combats avec tes défenseurs ! (bis) Fight back with your defenders! (repeat)
Sous nos drapeaux que la victoire Under our flags, let victory
Accoure à tes mâles accents, Hurry to your manly tone,
Que nos ennemis expirants So that our enemies, in their last breath,
Voient ton triomphe et notre gloire ! See your triumph and our glory!
 
Aux armes, citoyens... To arms, citizens...
 
(Couplet des enfants) (Children's Verse)
Nous entrerons dans la carrière [3] We shall enter the career
Quand nos aînés n'y seront plus When our elders will no longer be there
Nous y trouverons leur poussière There we shall find their dust
Et la trace de leurs vertus (bis) And the mark of their virtues (repeat)
Bien moins jaloux de leur survivre Much less jealous of surviving them
Que de partager leur cercueil, Than of sharing their coffins,
Nous aurons le sublime orgueil We shall have the sublime pride
De les venger ou de les suivre ! Of avenging or following them!
 
Aux armes, citoyens... To arms, citizens...


Motto: Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité Liberty, Equality, Fraternity Anthem: La Marseillaise France() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() Capital (and largest city) Paris Official languages French Demonym French Government Unitary semi-presidential republic  -  President Nicolas Sarkozy  -  Prime Minister François Fillon Formation  -  French State 843 French State Formed   -  Current... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... For other uses, see Weapon (disambiguation). ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... The word arms may refer to: The arm is anatomically the part of the body extending from the shoulder to the elbow. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... A cohort (from the Latin cohors, plural cohortes) is a fairly large military unit, generally consisting of one type of soldier. ... For other uses, see phalanx. ... François de Bouillé François Claude Amour, marquis de Bouillé (1739, Cluzel-Saint-Èble–1800, London) was a French general. ...


In popular culture

Movies

  • In The Simpsons Movie this song's tune is Springfield's anthem. They claim they stole the tune from the French. The townspeople of Springfield's uses the tune to make an anthem to Springfield, declaring that the French have "a few things they do well, like making love, wine and cheese".
  • In the 2007 film La Môme, the young Édith Piaf is shown singing the first verse and then the chorus of the song after her father's act re-enacting a true moment of the iconic chanteuse's life.
  • The song was part of a famous scene in the film Casablanca in which French resistance sympathisers used the song to drown out the German soldiers who were singing "Die Wacht am Rhein". [4] Various portion of La Marseillaise appears as recurring theme throughout the film especially in the opening credits where the entire song is played and at the very end of the film. These two songs were juxtaposed in exactly the same way five years earlier, in Jean Renoir's 1937 film Grand Illusion. Renoir traced the history of the song in the film he made the following year, "La Marseillaise".[5]
  • Abel Gance's film Napoléon features a scene in which the song is first sung by the French masses.
  • On the other hand, the movie The Brothers Grimm which takes place in a German country under french occupation, the same kind of scene can be seen with Germans singing their traditional songs in a tavern only to switch to the Marseillaise when french army officers enter. This is actually an error, as "La Marseillaise" was banned during Napoleon's rule.
  • In the 1981 movie, Escape to Victory, the final scene features the entire crowd of the stadium in occupied Paris spontaneously sing La Marseillaise at the end of the game.
  • In the 1937 French movie Grand Illusion, directed by Jean Renoir, that takes place during World War I, a group of French prisoners of war in a German POW camp spontaneously begin singing La Marseillaise in front of their German captors when it is announced that the French Army has won a significant victory.
  • In Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World the captain of the ship warns the crew after a poor cannon exercise that their children will end up singing the Marseillaise if they don't improve.
  • In the Blackadder movie Blackadder: Back & Forth, when Blackadder returns from his trip through time, he discovers that England is now under French rule because Napoléon won the Battle Of Waterloo, due to the fact that Blackadder accidentally crushed The Duke Of Wellington with his time machine. As his now-French guests walk up the stairs after conversing with him, they sing the first two lines of La Marseillaise.

The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... Springfield is the fictional city in which the animated American sitcom The Simpsons is set. ... La Vie En Rose is the American title for La Môme (French for The Kid), a 2007 French language movie directed by Olivier Dahan about singer Édith Piaf, starring Marion Cotillard as Piaf. ... Édith Piaf (December 19, 1915–October 11, 1963) was one of Frances most beloved singers,[1] and became a national icon. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... The Croix de Lorraine, chosen by General de Gaulle as the symbol of the resistance. ... Die Wacht am Rhein (English: The Watch/Guard on the Rhine) is a German patriotic anthem. ... Jean Renoir Jean Renoir (September 15, 1894 – February 12, 1979), born in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France was a film director. ... For other uses, see Grand Illusion (disambiguation). ... Abel Gance (October 25, 1889 - November 10, 1981) was a world-renowned French film director, producer, writer, actor and editor. ... Napoléon is an epic (1927) silent French film directed by Abel Gance that tells the story of the rise of Napoleon I of France. ... This article is about the movie The Brothers Grimm. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Escape to Victory is a 1981 film about Allied prisoners of war who are interned in a Nazi prison camp during World War II. It was directed by John Huston and stars Michael Caine and Sylvester Stallone. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Grand Illusion (disambiguation). ... Jean Renoir Jean Renoir (September 15, 1894 – February 12, 1979), born in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France was a film director. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is a 2003 film directed by Peter Weir and starring Russell Crowe as Jack Aubrey, with Paul Bettany as Stephen Maturin. ... For other uses, see Blackadder (disambiguation). ... Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ... Bonaparte as general, by Antoine-Jean Gros. ... Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000... Italic text His Grace Field Marshal the Most Noble Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...

Music

Yannick Noah (born May 18, 1960, Sedan, Ardennes, France) is a former professional tennis player from France. ... Jean-Baptiste Django Reinhardt (January 23, 1910 – May 16, 1953) was a Belgian Sinto Gypsy jazz guitarist. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article is about the Beatles song. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... French Foreign Legion is a popular song. ... Serge Gainsbourg (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a French poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... Sly and Robbie are probably reggaes most prolific and long lasting production team. ... Lowell Sly Fillmore Dunbar was born on 10 May 1952, in Kingston, Jamaica. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Laibach is the German name for Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia; Laibach is a Slovenian industrial musical group, named after the place name; Congress of Laibach was held in 1821 in todays Ljubljana. ... Volk is a German (and Dutch) word meaning people or folk. It is commonly used as prefix in words such as Volksentscheid (plebiscite) or Völkerbund (League of Nations), or the car manufacturer Volkswagen (literally, peoples car). A number of völkisch movements were set up in Germany after... Volk is a German (and Dutch) word meaning people or folk. It is commonly used as prefix in words such as Volksentscheid (plebiscite) or Völkerbund (League of Nations), or the car manufacturer Volkswagen (literally, peoples car). A number of völkisch movements were set up in Germany after... Allan Sherman (sometimes incorrectly Alan and Allen), November 30, 1924 – November 20, 1973, was an American musician, parodist, satirist, and television producer. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Louis the Pious (also known as Louis I, Louis the Fair and Louis the Debonaire, German form: Ludwig der Fromme, French form: Louis le Pieux or Louis le Débonnaire, Spanish form: Ludovico Pío) (April 16, 778 - June 20, 840) was Emperor and King of the Franks from 814... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Internet Archive headquarters, San Francisco The Internet Archive (archive. ...

Video games

Mike Tysons Punch-Out!! Punch-Out!! Arcade Glass Joe is a fictional character from Nintendos Punch-Out!! series of video games. ... Mike Tysons Punch-Out!! , Mike Tyson Punch-Out!!) is a cartoonish boxing video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System designed, developed, and published by Nintendo. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Dynamite Cop (1998) was published by Sega and initially released in arcades using the Sega Model 2 hardware. ... Civilization is a computer game created by Sid Meier for Microprose in 1991. ... Sid Meiers Civilization IV (Civilization IV or Civ4) is a turn-based strategy computer game released in 2005 and developed by lead designer Soren Johnson under the direction of Sid Meier and Meiers studio Firaxis Games. ... The original Worms logo. ...

Miscellany

  • The Brisbane Lions Australian rules football (AFL) team theme song "The Pride of Brisbane Town".
  • The carillon of the town hall in the Bavarian town of Cham plays the Marsaillaise every day at 12.05 p.m. to commemorate the French Marshal Nicolas Luckner, who was born there.[6]
  • Hong Kong singer Hacken Lee integrated the anthem as an opening to his World Cup 1998 Theme Song "The strange encounters of a soccer fan"
  • English language 'rugby song' version, as known in France amongst rugby-ites [7]
  • In Monty Python's broadway musical Spamalot when confronted by French knights in the song "Run Away!"
  • The 19th century Labour movement used a "Worker Marseillaise" (written 1864 by Jakob Audorf) that was later replaced by The Internationale. It was famously sung on the way to the gallows by those sentenced to death after the Haymarket Riot.
  • The song's theme was used by Jacques Offenbach in his Opera "Orpheus in the Underworld" to illustrate a revolution amongst the Olympic gods and goddesses with the lines "Aux armes Dieux et Demi-Dieux".
  • The British comedy series 'Allo 'Allo! spoofed Casablanca by having the patriotic French characters start singing "La Marseillaise", only to switch to Deutschlandlied when Nazi officers enter their cafe.
  • Also featured in Isaac Asimov's short SF story, 'Battle-hymn' about how the national anthem is used as a subliminal advertising ploy.
  • Featured in the Monty Python sketches, "A Man With a Tape Recorder Up His Nose" and "A Man With a Tape Recorder Up His Brother's Nose" and also "French lecture on sheep-aircraft"
  • In the cartoon I Am Weasel, when the baboon tries to make a transatlantic bridge from the United States to France, he mistakenly builds it to Mexico. Once he reached the end, he sang a song with a tune similar to that of the French national anthem.

Brisbane Lions Australian Football Club (the trading name for the Brisbane Bears-Fitzroy Football Club) is an Australian Football League club based in Brisbane, Queensland. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... The Pride of Brisbane Town is a song based on the tune of the French National anthem, and is the theme song of the Brisbane Lions, a team in the Australian Football League. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Cham ([ka:m]) is a city in the east of the federal state Bavaria, Germany. ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ... Niklaus, Count Luckner ( 1722 - 1794), Marshal of France, originated in Cham in eastern Bavaria, and joined the French military in 1763. ... Hacken Lee is a famous Cantopop singer in Hong Kong, mainland China, Taiwan, other parts of Southeast Asia and the United States for performing slow pop ballads. ... The 1998 Football World Cup was held in France. ... Monty Pythons Spamalot is a comedic musical lovingly ripped off from the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975). ... The labour movement or labor movement is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments, in particular through the implementation of specific laws governing labor relations. ... LInternationale in the original French. ... The Haymarket Riot on May 4, 1886 in Chicago is generally considered to have been an important influence on the origin of international May Day observances for workers. ... Jacques Offenbach Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819, in Cologne – 5 October 1880, in Paris) was a French composer and cellist of the Romantic era and one of the originators of the operetta form. ... Orpheus in the Underworld (in French: Orphée aux enfers) is an opéra bouffe (or opéra féerie in its revised version) in two acts by Jacques Offenbach. ... A British sitcom is a situation comedy (sitcom) produced in the United Kingdom. ... Allo Allo! was a long-running British sitcom broadcast on BBC1 from 1982 to 1992 comprising eighty-five episodes. ... Das Lied der Deutschen (The Song of the Germans, also known as Das Deutschlandlied, The Germany song) has been used wholly or partially as the national anthem of Germany since 1922. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... I Am Weasel was an American animated television series, created by David Feiss and broadcast on the Cartoon Network. ...

References

  1. ^ Modern History Sourcebook: La Marseillaise, 1792
  2. ^ La Marseillaise, l’Elysée.
  3. ^ "la carrière" ("the career"), that is, of being in the army. The seventh verse was not part of the original text; it was added in 1792 by an unknown author.
  4. ^ Youtube: Casablanca - Rick´s Bar
  5. ^ imdb.com
  6. ^ Cham.de
  7. ^ Francerugby.fr

See also

The name Belarusian Marseillaise (Belarusian: ) has been used to refer to two Belarusian patriotic songs. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... Onamo, namo (Serbian: Онамо, намо; in English: There, over there) was the popular anthem of Montenegro in the late 19th to early 20th century. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
La Marseillaise

Official French government sites

  • French Presidency website

Other sites

  • La Marseillaise performed by Roberto Alagna
  • La Marseillaise - Iain Patterson's comprehensive fansite features sheet music, history, and music files. A full length six verse version of the anthem performed by David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra & Chorus can be found in the Berlioz page.
  • Easybyte — free easy piano arrangement of La Marseillaise
  • Adminet-France

  Results from FactBites:
 
La Marseillaise - Hymne national français (136 words)
La Marseillaise, également connu sous le nom de Chant de guerre pour l’armée du Rhin, est l’hymne national français.
La Marseillaise est chantée et interprétée lors des cérémonies militaires (8 mai, 11 novembre, etc.) et lors de la fête nationale du 14 juillet se déroulant à Paris aux Champs Élysée.
Marseillaise, marseillaise, hymne national, guerre, bataille, France, république, Serge Gainsbourg, Rouget de Lisle, Napoléon Bonaparte, République française, French national anthem, 1789, Révolution, emblèmes républicains, symbole, chant patriotique, fête nationale, partition musicale, mélodie téléphone portable, mobile, histoire.
France - nationalanthems.info (647 words)
"La Marseillaise" was written and composed by Claude-Joseph Rouget de Lisle, captain in the Engineering corps garrisoned in Strasbourg during the night of 24 to 25 April 1792 at the behest of the city's mayor, Baron de Dietrich.
Under the First Republic, "La Marseillaise" was one of the civic songs that contributed to the success of the Revolution, and thus was given official status (along with "Chœur de la Liberté", with words by Voltaire).
At last the Marseillaise was made the official national anthem by the constitutions of the Fourth and Fifth Republics (Article 2 of the Constitution of 4 October 1958).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m