FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > LOL (Internet slang)
Look up LOL, lol in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

LOL (also written lol or LoL) is a common element of Internet slang used, historically, on Usenet but now widespread to other forms of computer-mediated communication, and even spread to face-to-face communication. It is an abbreviation for "laughing out loud"[1][2] or "laugh out loud".[3] "LOL" is one of many initialisms for expressing bodily reactions, in particular laughter, as text, including initialisms such as "ROTFL" ("roll(ing) on the floor laughing"),[4][5] a more emphatic expression of laughter, and "BWL" ("bursting with laughter"), above which there is "no greater compliment" according to Magid.[6] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (from wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ... Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) is any form of communication between two or more individuals who interact and/or influence each other via computer-supported media. ... Face to Face may refer to interactions or meetings between people in real life. ... Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations formed from the initial letter or letters of words, such as NATO and XHTML, and are pronounced in a way that is distinct from the full pronunciation of what the letters stand for. ...


Another similar expression is "LMAO" ("laughing my ass off")


The list of initialisms "grows by the month"[4] and they are collected along with emoticons and smileys into folk dictionaries which are circulated informally amongst users of Usenet, IRC, and other forms of (textual) computer-mediated communication.[7] These initialisms are controversial, and several authors recommend against their use, either in general or in specific contexts such as business communications. An emoticon (pronounced (IPA) ) is a small piece of specialized ASCII art (usually two to five characters, always on a single line) used in text messages as informal markup to indicate emotions and attitudes that would be conveyed by body language in face-to-face communications. ... The smiley has gone through many incarnations over the years, but it consistently retains the same features. ... Folklore is the body of expressive culture, including tales, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, material culture, and so forth within a particular population comprising the traditions (including oral traditions) of that culture, subculture, or group. ... Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of real-time Internet chat or synchronous conferencing. ...


The use of LOL to express laughter is unrelated to other uses of the abbreviation, many of which, such as "lots of love", predate the Internet.[citation needed] LOL has also superceded the more-obvious "Ha!" that letter writers used to use.[citation needed]


The three acronyms are also used in words similar to real-life objects. Three examples are LOLlerskates, ROFLcopter, and LMAOnaise (similar to roller skates, helicopter, and mayonnaise).

Contents

Analysis

Many people are critical of "LOL" and its related acronyms, and there is some debate over their use.


Lacetti, professor of humanities at Stevens Institute of Technology, and Molsk in their essay entitled The Lost Art of Writing[8][9] are critical of the acronyms, predicting reduced chances of employment for students who use such acronyms, stating that "Unfortunately for these students, their bosses will not be 'lol' when they read a report that lacks proper punctuation and grammar, has numerous misspellings, various made-up words, and silly acronyms." This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Yunker and Barry[10] in a study of on-line courses and how they can be improved through podcasting have found that these acronyms, and emoticons as well, are "often misunderstood" by students and are "difficult to decipher" unless their meanings are explained in advance. They single out the example of "ROFL" as not obviously being the abbreviation of "rolling on the floor laughing" (emphasis added). Haig[1] singles out "LOL" as one of the three most popular initialisms in Internet slang, alongside "BFN" ("bye for now") and "IMHO" ("in my humble opinion"). He describes these acronyms, and the various initialisms of Internet slang in general, as convenient, but warns that "as ever more obscure acronyms emerge they can also be rather confusing". Bidgoli[11] likewise states that these initialisms "save keystrokes for the sender but [...] might make comprehension of the message more difficult for the receiver", that "[s]lang may hold different meanings and lead to misunderstandings especially in international settings", and thus advising that they be used "only when you are sure that the other person knows the meaning". An orange square with waves indicates that an RSS feed is present on a web page. ...


Hueng,[4] in discussing these acronyms in the context of performative utterances, points out the difference between telling someone that one is laughing out loud and actually laughing out loud: "The latter response is a straightforward action. The former is a self-reflexive representation of an action: I not only do something but also show you that I am doing it. Or indeed, I may not actually laugh out loud but may use the locution 'LOL' to communicate my appreciation of your attempt at humor."


David Crystal[12] notes that use of "LOL" is not necessarily genuine, just as the use of smiley faces or grins is not necessary genuine, posing the rhetorical question "how many people are actually 'laughing out loud' when they send LOL?". Franzini[2] concurs, stating that there is as yet no research that has determined the percentage of people who are actually laughing out loud when they write "LOL". Professor David Crystal, OBE (born 1941 in Lisburn, Northern Ireland, UK) is a linguist, academic and author. ...


Victoria Clarke, in her analysis of telnet talkers,[13] states that capitalization is important when people write "LOL", and that "a user who types LOL may well be laughing louder than one who types lol", and opines that "these standard expressions of laughter are losing force through overuse". Egan[3] describes "LOL", "ROTFL", and other initialisms as helpful as long as they are not overused. He recommends against their use in business correspondence because the recipient may not be aware of their meanings, and because in general neither they nor emoticons are (in his view) appropriate in such correspondence. Lindsell-Roberts[14] shares that view and gives the same advice of not using them in business correspondence, "or you won't be LOL".


Spread from written to spoken communication

"LOL", "ROTFL","LMAO", and the other initialisms have crossed from computer-mediated communication to face-to-face communication. Teenagers now sometimes use them in spoken communication as well as in written, with "ROFL" pronounced /roʊfl/ or "raf•ful" and "LOL" pronounced /lʌl/ or "lahl" for example. David Crystal — likening the introduction of "LOL", "ROTFL", and others into spoken language in magnitude to the revolution of Johannes Gutenberg's invention of movable type in the 15th century — states that this is "a brand new variety of language evolving", invented by young people within five years, that "extend[s] the range of the language, the expressiveness [and] the richness of the language". Commentators disagree, saying that these new words, being abbreviations for existing, long-used, phrases, don't "enrich" anything; they just shorten it.[15][16][17] A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... Movable metal type, and composing stick, descended from Gutenbergs invention Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (c. ... A case of cast metal type pieces and typeset matter in a composing stick Movable type is the system of printing and typography using movable pieces of metal type, made by casting from matrices struck by letterpunches. ...


Geoffrey K. Pullum points out that even if interjections such as LOL and ROTFL became very common in spoken English, their "total effect on language" would be "utterly trivial".[18] Professor Geoffrey K. Pullum (born in 1945 in Irvine, Scotland) is a linguist specialising in the study of English. ...


Conversely, a 2003 study of college students by Naomi Baron found that the use of these initialisms in computer-mediated communication, specifically in instant messaging, was actually lower than to be expected. The students "used few abbreviations, acronyms, and emoticons". The spelling was "reasonably good" and contractions were "not ubiquitous". Out of 2,185 transmissions, there were 90 initialisms in total, only 31 CMC-style abbreviations, 49 emoticons, and only 76 occurrences of "LOL".[17] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Naomi Baron. ... A screenshot of PowWow, one of the first instant messengers with a graphical user interface Instant messaging or IM is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text. ...


Variations on the theme

For a list of words for Internet laughter slang, see the Internet laughter slang category of words in Wiktionary, the free dictionary

Despite it being an English acronym, it is often used by non-English speakers as-is, even in other scripts (eg. Hebrew: לול, Cyrillic: лол). Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (from wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A writing system, also called a script, is used to visually record a language with symbols. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ...


Translations in widespread use

Most of these abbreviations are usually found in lowercase.

  • lal or lawl — can refer to either a pseudo-pronunciation of LOL, or the German translation (although most German speakers use "LOL"). Saying "lawl" is sometimes meant in mockery of those who use the term LOL, and not meant as serious usage. However, "lawl" can sometimes stand for "laughing a whole lot".
  • — used commonly in 2channel, a Japanese equivalent of the acronym. (w stands for warau (笑う), which means 'to laugh' in Japanese.)
  • lolz — plural form occasionally used in place of "LOL".
  • lulz — an occasionally used slang for the above plural.
  • mdr — French version of the expression "LOL", meaning "mort de rire". Roughly translated, it means "dead from laughing".

2channel , 2ch for short) is a Japanese Internet forum, thought to be the largest in the world. ...

Other languages

Lol is a Dutch word (not an acronym), which, conveniently, means 'fun' ('lollig' means funny).


LOL in Sinhalese refers to a tropical cherry.[citation needed] Sinhala (also referred to as Sinhalese; earlier referred to as Singhalese) is the mother tongue of the Sinhalese, the largest ethnic group of Sri Lanka. ...


Popular reference

  • "Weird Al" Yankovic says "ROTFLOL" in his rap parody "White and Nerdy".
  • In the serio-comic detective TV series Monk, in the episode called "Mr. Monk and the Really, Really Dead Guy", first broadcast on February 23, 2007, the technologically-challenged title character learns to use the Internet for the first time. He is so happy at receiving his first e-mail that he tells his colleagues, "It's enough to make me 'LOL' out loud."

Weird Al Yankovic (album) Alfred Matthew Weird Al Yankovic (IPA pronunciation: ; born October 23, 1959) is an American musician, satirist, parodist, accordionist, and television producer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Monk is an Emmy Award winning television show about the private detective Adrian Monk (Tony Shalhoub) afflicted by Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) who also suffers from multiple phobias. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Matt Haig (2001). E-Mail Essentials: How to Make the Most of E-Communications. Kogan Page, 89. ISBN 0749435763. 
  2. ^ a b Louis R. Franzini (2002). Kids Who Laugh: How to Develop Your Child's Sense of Humor. Square One Publishers, Inc., 145–146. ISBN 0757000088. 
  3. ^ a b Michael Egan. Email Etiquette. Cool Publications Ltd, 32,57–58. ISBN 1844811182. 
  4. ^ a b c Jiuan Heng (2003). "The emergence of pure consciousness: The Theatre of Virtual Selves in the age of the Internet", in Peter D. Hershock, M. T. Stepaniants, and Roger T. Ames: Technology and Cultural Values: On the Edge of the Third Millennium. University of Hawaii Press, 561. ISBN 0824826477. 
  5. ^ Eric S. Raymond and Guy L. Steele (1996). The New Hacker's Dictionary. MIT Press, 435. ISBN 0262680920. 
  6. ^ Lawrence J. Magid (2001). The Little PC Book: Windows Xp. Peachpit Press, 287. ISBN 0201754703. 
  7. ^ Steven G. Jones (1998). Cybersociety 2.0: Revisiting Computer-Mediated Community and Technology. Sage Publications Inc, 52. ISBN 0761914625. 
  8. ^ Silvio Lacetti and Scott Molsk. "Cost of poor writing no laughing matter", Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 2003-09-06. 
  9. ^ Stevens Institute of Technology (2003-10-22). Article co-authored by Stevens professor and student garners nationwide attention from business, academia. Press release.
  10. ^ Frank Yunker and Stephen Barry. "Threaded Podcasting: The Evolution of On-Line Learning". Dan Remenyi Proceedings of the International Conference on e-Learning, University of Quebec at Montreal, 22-23 June 2006: 516, Academic Conferences Limited. ISBN 1905305222. 
  11. ^ Hossein Bidgoli (2004). The Internet Encyclopedia. John Wiley and Sons, 277. ISBN 0471222011. 
  12. ^ David Crystal (2001-09-20). Language and the Internet. Cambridge University Press, 34. ISBN 0-521-80212-1. 
  13. ^ Victoria Clarke (2002-01-30). Internet English: an analysis of the variety of language used on Telnet talkers (PDF).
  14. ^ Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts. Strategic Business Letters and E-Mail. Houghton Mifflin, 289. ISBN 0618448330. 
  15. ^ Neda Ulaby (2006-02-18). OMG: IM Slang Is Invading Everyday English. Digital Culture. National Public Radio.
  16. ^ jadedlistener (2006-02-25). OMG, that's, like, so uninteresting!.
  17. ^ a b Kristen Philipkoski. "The Web Not the Death of Language", Wired News, 2005-02-22. 
  18. ^ Geoffrey K. Pullum (2005-01-23). English in Deep Trouble?. Language Log. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.

Eric S. Raymond (FISL 6. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wired News, online at Wired. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Language Log is a popular collaborative language blog maintained by University of Pennsylvania phonetician Mark Liberman. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ...

Further reading

  • Russ Armadillo Coffman (1990-01-17). "smilies collection". rec.humor. (Google Groups). Retrieved on 2006-12-22. — an early Usenet posting of a folk dictionary of abbreviations and emoticons, listing "LOL" and "ROTFL"
  • Connery, Brian A. (1997-02-25). "IMHO: Authority and egalitarian rhetoric in the virtual coffeehouse", in Porter, D.: Internet Culture. New York: Routledge, 161–179. ISBN 0415916844. 
  • Ryan Goudelocke (August 2004). "CREDIBILITY AND AUTHORITY ON INTERNET MESSAGE-BOARDS" (PDF). Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College.

MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

See also: Emoticon This is a list of both complete and abbreviated internet slang. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/LOL (Internet slang) (1031 words)
LOL (also written lol or Lol) is a common element of Internet slang used, historically, on Usenet but now widespread to other forms of computer-mediated communication such as Yahoo and MSN messenger, and even spread to face-to-face communication.
The use of LOL to express laughter is unrelated to LOL, many of which, such as "lots of love", predate the Internet.
Yunker and Barry in a study of on-line courses and how they can be improved through podcasting have found that these acronyms, and emoticons as well, are "often misunderstood" by students and are "difficult to decipher" unless their meanings are explained in advance.
Internet Slang (1306 words)
These are presented to help sort out all the various short-cuts and abbreviations that you may encounter.
LOL --- "laughing out loud", or "lots of laughs"; as a reply to something amusing.
NT --- "no text"; used on Internet forums or Usenet to indicate that a post has no content.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m