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Encyclopedia > LGBT rights opposition

Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality or transgenderism. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


Around the world World laws on homosexuality US laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ...


By country This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ...


History · Groups · Activists LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... Here is a list of gay-rights organizations around the world. ... This article is new. ...


Declaration of Montreal Martina Navrátilová and Mark Tewksbury read the Declaration of Montreal at the opening ceremonies of the World Outgames. ...


Same-sex relationships Same-sex union can refer to: same-sex marriage -- the civil or religious rites of marriage that make it equivalent to opposite-sex marriages in all aspects. ...


Marriage · Adoption   CA, CT, MD, NY, NJ, OR, RI, VT, WA See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live... LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ...


Opposition · Discrimination Homophobia is a term used to describe: A culturally determined phobia manifesting as fear, revulsion, or contempt for desire or physical love between people of the same sex. ...


Violence John Atherton, Bishop of Waterford and Lismore, was hanged for sodomy under a law that he had helped to institute. ...


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

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LGBT rights opposition refers to various movements or attitudes which oppose the extension of certain rights to lesbian and gay people, and by extension to bisexuals, and transsexuals. The specific rights that are opposed may include rights to social equality, same-sex civil unions, adoption, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of sexual behaviour, sexual orientation or sexual identity. LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality or transgenderism. ... A lesbian is a woman who is romantically and sexually attracted only to other women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... Social equality is a social state of affairs in which certain different people have the same status in a certain respect, minimally at least in voting rights, freedom of speech and assembly, and property rights. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... Adoption by same-sex couples refers to the adoption of children by gay or lesbian couples. ... This article is about discrimination in the social science context. ... Gay sex is a part of some males sexual needs, it is very popular in China and Greenland. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, normally conceived of as falling into several significant categories based around the sex or gender that the individual finds attractive. ... Sexual identity is the sex with which a person identifies, or is identified. ...

Contents

History

Students organized by the Nazi party parade in front of the Institute for Sexual Research in Berlin on May 6, 1933 prior to pillaging it and confiscating its books and photos for burning.
Students organized by the Nazi party parade in front of the Institute for Sexual Research in Berlin on May 6, 1933 prior to pillaging it and confiscating its books and photos for burning.

The first organized gay rights movement arose in the late nineteenth century in Germany.[citation needed] When the German Nazi party came to power in 1933, one of the party's first acts was to burn down the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft. Subsequently, the Nazis also began sending homosexuals to concentration camps (see History of gays in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust). The organized gay rights movement would not rise again until after the Second World War. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... The Institut für Sexualwissenschaft (Variously translated as Institute of Sex Research or Institute for Sexology) (Germany, 1919-1933) was an early sexology research institute. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Institut für Sexualwissenschaft was an early private sexology research institute in Germany from 1919 to 1933. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... Once vibrant, Eldorado gay night club in Berlin after being shut down in 1933 Gay men and, to a lesser extent, lesbians, were two of several groups targeted by Nazis during the Holocaust. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


From the late 1940s to the early 1960s gay rights movements began to form in America and Western Europe, but it was not until the sexual revolution of the 1960s and 1970s that an organized movement arose to oppose gay rights. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the 1980s the rise of AIDS contributed to a public backlash against LGBT rights issues.[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ...


Conservative opposition to LGBT rights in the US

In the late 1970s gay rights organizations were forming self-supporting communities in large urban centers in America such as San Francisco, New York City, and Minneapolis. Several states reformed their criminal code to decriminalize same-sex sexual relations between consenting adults, and some cities were passed local anti-discrimination laws that included protection based on sexual orientation. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, normally conceived of as falling into several significant categories based around the sex or gender that the individual finds attractive. ...


Anita Bryant organized the first major opposition movement to gay rights in America, based on fundamentalist Christian values.[citation needed] The group used various slogans that played off the fear that gay people were interested in "recruiting" or molesting children into a "life-style." A common slogan of the campaign was "Homosexuals cannot reproduce — so they must recruit." The Bryant campaign was successful in repealing many of the city anti-discrimination laws, and in proposing other citizen initiatives, such as a failed California ballot question designed to ban homosexuals or anyone who endorsed gay rights from being a public school teacher.[citation needed] Anita Jane Bryant (born March 25, 1940, in Barnsdall, Oklahoma) is an American singer who made a series of television commercials for Florida orange juice. ... Fundamentalist Christianity is a fundamentalist movement, especially within American Protestantism. ...


The name of this group was "Save Our Children," and its most successful campaign resulted in the repealing of Dade County's Civil Rights Ordinance by an overwhelming margin of 69 to 31.[citation needed] Soon after, legislation was passed outlawing adoption by non-heterosexual persons in Florida.[citation needed] In 1998, Dade County passed an anti-discrimination law that included the protection of people from discrimination based on sexual orientation, but the ban on homosexuals adopting children remains on the books.[citation needed] The success of the Bryant campaign encouraged the development of other organizations which opposed gay rights legislation.[citation needed] Dade County can refer to the following places: Dade County, Florida, the states southeastern-most, now renamed Miami-Dade County Dade County, Georgia, the states northwestern-most, bordering Alabama and Tennessee Dade County, Missouri, in the southwestern part of the state This is a disambiguation page — a... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, normally conceived of as falling into several significant categories based around the sex or gender that the individual finds attractive. ...


From the late 1970s onwards, Conservative Christian organizations such as the 700 Club, Focus on the Family, Concerned Women For America, and the Christian Coalition built strong lobbying and fundraising organizations to oppose what they called special rights. These organizations tend to align themselves with the Republican Party. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 700 Club is a Christian News and talk show hosted by religious leader Pat Robertson, airing on cables ABC Family and in syndication throughout the United States and Canada. ... Focus on the Family (FOTF or FotF), founded in 1977, is a Christian non-profit organization based in the United States. ... Concerned Women for America is a conservative Christian group that is active in politics in the United States. ... This article is about the organization presently operating in the United States. ... Special rights is a political term originally used by libertarians to refer to laws granting rights to one or more groups which are not extended to other groups, such as affirmative action or hate crime legislation with regard to ethnic or religious minorities. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


Conservative Christian organizations behaved similarly in other nations. In the 1980s organizations opposed to gay rights successfully persuaded the British Conservative Party to enact Section 28, which banned public schools from "promoting homosexuality" or endorsing same-sex marriages.[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ...


American Public opinion

Public opinion has shifted towards increased acceptance of homosexuality and equal rights for gays and lesbians over the past 30 years. According to the Gallup poll, the percentage of Americans who think that homosexual relations between consenting adults should be legal has increased from 32% to 57% since 1986.[1][2] In 1977, 56% of Americans thought that homosexuals should have equal rights in terms of job opportunities. Today, that number has risen to 89%.[3][2] In 1992, 38% thought that homosexuality should be considered an acceptable lifestyle. Today, that number is 54%.[1][2] In 1997, 27% of Americans thought that gay marriages should be legally valid. That number is now 39%.[4][2] In 1977, 13% of Americans thought that sexual orientation was genetically determined; now, 42%[citation needed] think it is. Although, how one believes sexual orientation is determined does not necessarily make them intolerant or tolerant.[5]


Numerous studies have investigated the prevalence of acceptance and disapproval of homosexuality, and have consistently found correlates with various demographic, psychological, and social variables. For example, studies (mainly conducted in the United States) have found that heterosexuals with positive attitudes towards homosexuality are more likely to be female, young, non-religious, well-educated, politically liberal or moderate, and have close personal contact with openly gay men and lesbians.[6] They are also more likely to have positive attitudes towards other minority groups[7] and are less likely to support traditional gender roles.[8] Coming out of the closet (often shortened to coming out in winking reference to the public introduction of debutantes) describes the voluntary public announcement of ones (primarily homosexual or bisexual) sexual orientation or gender identity. ...


Difference between hating homosexuals and hating homosexuality

Many organizations opposed to LGBT social movements don't have the same "God hates fags" message as the small church led by Fred Phelps, but they still oppose some aspects of homosexuality. Homosexuality may be framed in one of three ways: as a problem to be overcome, akin to alcoholism, something to be feared or loathed in the person him/herself, or something akin to being a red-head or being taller-than-average. The ex-gay movement aligns with the first of these. LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality or transgenderism. ... God Hates Fags can refer to: Westboro Baptist Churchs website and slogan A song by Donnie Davies Category: ... Fred Waldron Phelps, Sr. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ...


While the ex-gay movement has been in existence since the 1970s, it started to be a greater force in socially conservative organizations that wanted to oppose affirmation of homosexual acts. Along with the ex-gay movement, the focus on the opposition often centers often around same-sex marriage as many other gay issues such as anti-discrimination laws and the right to privacy have mainstream support. For example, when the United States Supreme Court ruled in Lawrence v. Texas that states could no longer criminalize consensual acts of anal sex between homosexual adults, many opponents of gay rights opposed the ruling on the grounds that it would lead to gay marriage. Under the model of opposition being described in this section, several gay rights issues should still be opposed, but gay men and women should be treated with compassion and possibly treatment. The ex-gay or exodus movement claims that homosexuals can become heterosexual or otherwise leave homosexuality behind through counselling, prayer, and other therapies if they choose to do so. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... The ex-gay or exodus movement claims that homosexuals can become heterosexual or otherwise leave homosexuality behind through counselling, prayer, and other therapies if they choose to do so. ...   CA, CT, MD, NY, NJ, OR, RI, VT, WA See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... It has been suggested that Matthew Limon be merged into this article or section. ... Roman men having anal sex. ...


Studies have shown that people with negative attitudes towards lesbians and gays are more likely to be male, older, religious, less well educated, politically conservative, and have little close personal contact with out gay men and lesbians.[9] They are also more likely to have negative attitudes towards other minority groups[10] and support traditional gender roles.[11] They may have a personal, moral or religious objection to homosexuality. Societal attitudes towards homosexuality vary greatly in different cultures and different historical periods, as do attitudes toward sexual desire, activity and relationships in general. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Coming out of the closet (often shortened to coming out in winking reference to the public introduction of debutantes) describes the voluntary public announcement of ones (primarily homosexual or bisexual) sexual orientation or gender identity. ...


Boy Scouts of America

Policy and rationale

The Boy Scouts of America exclude homosexuals and bisexuals from its organizations, generally for Scoutmasters but also for scouts in leadership positions. Their rationale is that homosexual activity is immoral, and that scouts are expected to have certain moral standards and values, as the Scout Oath and Scout Law requires boys to be "morally straight." The Boy Scout organization does not view their policy as unjustly discriminatory, but instead defends their policy saying that, "Tolerance for diversity of values does not require abdication of one's own values" [6]. The Boy Scouts of America, the largest youth organization in the United States, has policies which prohibit atheists, agnostics, and known or avowed homosexuals from membership in its Scouting program; both youths and adults have had their memberships revoked as a result. ... The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is a United States Scouting organization, with some presence in other countries. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ... Since the birth of Scouting in 1907, all Scouts around the world have taken a Scout promise or oath to live up to ideals of the movement, and subscribed to a Scout Law. ... Since the publication of Scouting for Boys in 1908, all Scouts and Guides around the world have taken a Scout Promise or oath to live up to ideals of the movement, and subscribed to a Scout Law. ... This article is about discrimination in the social science context. ...


Legal defense of this policy

In 2000 the United States Supreme Court ruled in the case Boy Scouts of America v. Dale [7] that the Boy Scouts of America is a private organization, and as such can decide its own membership rules--but there is still a movement to try and persuade the organization to change its policy or allow local chapters to decide for themselves. 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Boy Scouts of America et al v. ... A club is an association of people united by a common interest or goal. ...


In 2005, the U.S. Congress passed the "Support Our Scouts Act of 2005" to exempt the BSA from anti-discrimination laws, to require the Department of Defense to support scouting Jamborees (thus rendering ineffective a Federal Court injunction prohibiting this as an unconstitutional establishment of religion in violation of the First Amendment) and to require state or local governments that receive Community Development Block Grant money from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to allow BSA to have meetings in their facilities or on their property. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... The Support Our Scouts Act of 2005 was passed to prevent State and Federal agencies from reducing their support for the Boy Scouts of America (and other youth organization). ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... The national Scout jamboree is a gathering, or jamboree of thousands of members of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), usually held every four years and organized by the BSA National Council. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into constitutionality. ... Establishment of religion refers to investing political power in a particular religious faith or body. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties/Parishes/Boroughs, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ...


Critics of the policy

Critics claim that homosexuals are not incompatible with scout values and are allowed to be members in most countries in the world [8], including the United Kingdom, where scouting was founded. Some United Ways, municipalities, school districts and businesses have stopped supporting the BSA for those reasons. [9] The United Way of America is a coalition of charitable organizations in the United States that have traditionally pooled efforts in fundraising. ...


Other outdoor-focused, youth-based organizations such as the 4-H club and Girl Scouts of the USA do not have similar policies. The BSA, however, receives a high level of support from religious groups, many of which are noted for their opposition to the gay rights movement. [10] 4-H in the United States is a youth organization in the United States administered by the Department of Agriculture Cooperative Extension System with the mission of empowering youth to reach their full potential, working and learning in partnership with caring adults. ... The Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA) is a youth organization for girls in the United States and American girls living abroad. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also...


United States Armed Forces

Don't ask Don't tell policy and its rationale

The United States Armed Forces has a "don't ask, don't tell" policy, under which gay men and lesbians can be discharged from the armed forces if they come out, but will not be specifically questioned about their sexual orientation. The policy is defended on morality grounds, it is also argued that young avowed heterosexual men would not tolerate working with young avowed homosexuals and that lifting the ban would hurt unit morale and cohesion. LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      Dont ask, dont tell is the common term for the U.S. military policy which implements Pub. ... Coming out of the closet (often shortened to coming out in winking reference to the public introduction of debutantes) describes the voluntary public announcement of ones (primarily homosexual or bisexual) sexual orientation or gender identity. ... -1...


Critics of the policy and rationale

Even when it was put in place, there have been advocates for homosexuals in the military. Critics of the current policy often argue that when the United Kingdom admitted homosexuals, no such unit cohesion or morale was lost. The same comparison is made to no negative consequences when African-Americans and women were admitteed into the military. LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      The militaries of the world have a variety of responses to homosexual and bisexual orientations. ...


Mainstream conservative opposition

In many Western democracies, mainstream parties of the right oppose gay marriage and have concerns about the favourable portrayal of homosexuality in school sex education and the media, and about gays in the military, but do not seek to criminalise homosexual behaviour. Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ...


Fascist and far-right opposition

Fascist political parties have been universal in their violent opposition to gay rights. Today, Neo Nazi organizations and oppose gay rights, and may advocate the or life sentences in prison or concentration camps for homosexuals, or even the death penalty [12] (which was instituted by the original Nazis instituted in 1942[13]). The Ku Klux Klan hold that homosexual behaviour should be illegal, and HIV positive people should be forcibly hospitalized.[14]. The British National Party has shifted its platform from recriminalisation to an extension of clause 28-style legislation, ie. making it illegal to portray homosexuality positively in the media.[15] Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... This article is about the modern party. ... Clause 28 is both: another name for Section 28 a Boy George song against it This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Libertarian opposition

Libertarianism runs contrary to the mainstream gay rights movement on some, but not all, gay rights issues. While a libertarian perspective on gay rights endorses some gay rights positions, it also opposes gay rights when they involve anti-discrimination laws that impose government regulations on the private sector, religious organizations or private clubs. The Gays and Lesbians For Individual Liberty filed a Supreme Court brief in support of the right of the Boy Scouts of America to refuse to admit gays into its ranks (noting that if the BSA were forced by government to admit gay members, gay organizations might also be forced to admit anti-gay members). Outright Libertarians, favor an approach that does not require government coercion and seek to limit government action to the implementation of equal rights -- rather than "special rights" such as legally-required preferential treatment on the basis of sexual orientation in employment, housing or education that are often demanded by other gay organizations. The libertarian perspective on gay rights has been a topic of debate among libertarians, especially in the United States. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is a United States Scouting organization, with some presence in other countries. ... Outright Libertarians is a United States association of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and other self-identified queer (LGBTQ) Libertarian Party activists and supporters. ...


The libertarian position on gay rights underscores the divide between liberal groups (who favor ENDA and hate crimes laws as a primary vehicle for gay rights) and libertarians (who generally view gay rights as equal treatment in areas such as marriage equality and other positions that are broadly opposed by both Democrats and Republicans).


Anarchist & other opposition

Most anarchists support gay rights. Some anarchists, such as L. Susan Brown, oppose all marriage, and therefore gay marriage, due to its connection to the state. Some anarchists also see marriage as an inherently oppressive institution. (See Anarchist criticisms to sexuality) L. Susan Brown is an anarcha-feminist writer and theoretician. ... This article discusses the anarchist critiques of society and proposed solutions from the anarchist perspective. ...


Psychological

Most LGBT groups see homosexuality as natural and not a choice. A resolution adopted by the American Psychological Association in August 1997 states that "homosexuality is not a mental disorder".[16] The American Psychological Association (APA) is a professional organization representing psychology in the US. It has around 150,000 members and an annual budget of around $70m. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Some groups, many of which are funded by religious organizations, promote an idea called reparative therapy, which considers homosexuality to be a behavior that can be modified, rather than a permanent orientation, with the goal of creating ex-gays.[17] Ironically the desire to change ones sexuality is considered a disorder by the American Psychological Association. It has been suggested that Ex-gay be merged into this article or section. ... The ex-gay or exodus movement claims that homosexuals can become heterosexual or otherwise leave homosexuality behind through counselling, prayer, and other therapies if they choose to do so. ... The American Psychological Association (APA) is a professional organization representing psychology in the US. It has around 150,000 members and an annual budget of around $70m. ...


Religious and philosophical

Christian,[18][19][20] Jewish,[21] and Islamic[22] social conservatives view homosexuality as a sin, and its practice and acceptance in society as a weakening of moral standards. The Unification Church concurs with this view, although it permits homosexuals to be members and attend worship services. This is a primary reason why many religious social conservatives oppose the gay rights movement. Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral rule, or the state of having committed such a violation. ... The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ...


By contrast, some Liberal Christian churches are supportive of gay rights, such as the leadership and many congregations within the United Church of Christ have supported the right for homosexuals to marry.[23] Currently the Episcopal Church and Presbyterian Church (USA) bless civil unions but do not 'marry' their congregants. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Liberal Christianity, sometimes called... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ...


Also, in Europe some Lutheran, Reformed and United churches in Germany (EKD), Switzerland, Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark and Sweden are supportive of gay rights. In recent years, support has also come from some Anglican churches (Canada, England). The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ... United can refer to: // In the main, United refers to one of two professional football teams in England: Manchester United and Sheffield United. ... The Evangelical Church in Germany (German Evangelische Kirche in Deutschland, abbreviated as EKD) is a federation of 24 Lutheran, Reformed and United churches in their respective regions. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130...


Some also cite natural law, sometimes called God's law or nature's law, when opposing the gay rights movement.[24][25][26] Natural law or the law of nature (Latin lex naturalis) is a law whose content is set by nature, and that therefore has validity everywhere. ...


See also

Anti-gay slogans are catchphrases or slogans which express opposition to homosexuality in ways which gay rights activists consider to be irrationally hostile or fearful (see homophobia and also anti-gay). ... The culture war (or culture wars) in American usage is a supposed political conflict based on different idealized cultural values. ... The ex-gay or exodus movement claims that homosexuals can become heterosexual or otherwise leave homosexuality behind through counselling, prayer, and other therapies if they choose to do so. ... This article is about family values as a political concept. ... A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church; a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... The homosexual agenda (or the gay agenda) is a term used by some social conservatives to describe the goal of increasing LGBT acceptance through public policies, media exposure, and cultural change. ... This is a list of Christian denominational positions on homosexuality. ... For age-structured homosexuality, see Pederasty in the Middle East Before the emergence of Islam in the Arabian Peninsula, many forms of sexuality was being experienced. ... The subject of homosexuality in Judaism dates back to the Biblical book of Leviticus. ... World laws on homosexuality US laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality or transgenderism. ...

References

  1. ^ a b [1]
  2. ^ a b c d [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4]
  5. ^ [5]
  6. ^ Studies finding that heterosexual men usually exhibit more hostile attitudes toward gay men and lesbians than do heterosexual women:
    :*Herek, G. M. (1994). Assessing heterosexuals’ attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. In "B. Greene and G.M. Herek (Eds.) Psychological perspectives on lesbian and gay issues: Vol. 1 Lesbian and gay psychology: Theory, research, and clinical applications." Thousands Oaks, Ca: Sage.
    :*Kite, M.E. (1984). Sex differences in attitudes toward homosexuals: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Homosexuality, 10 (1-2), 69-81.
    :*Morin, S., & Garfinkle, E. (1978). Male homophobia. Journal of Social Issues, 34 (1), 29-47.
    :*Thompson, E., Grisanti, C., & Pleck, J. (1985). Attitudes toward the male role and their correlates. Sex Roles, 13 (7/8), 413-427.
    For other correlates, see:
    :*Larson et al. (1980) Heterosexuals' Attitudes Toward Homosexuality, The Journal of Sex Research, 16, 245-257
    :*Herek, G. (1988), Heterosexuals' Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men, The Journal of Sex Research, 25, 451-477
    :*Kite, M.E., & Deaux, K., 1986. Attitudes toward homosexuality: Assessment and behavioral consequences. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 7, 137-162
    :*Haddock, G., Zanna, M. P., & Esses, V. M. (1993). Assessing the structure of prejudicial attitudes: The case of attitudes toward homosexuals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1105-1118.
    :See also: Lewis, Gregory B., Black-White Differences in Attitudes toward Homosexuality and Gay Rights, Public Opinion Quarterly, Volume 67, Number 1, Pp. 59-78
  7. ^ Herek, G.M. (1991). Stigma, prejudice, and violence against lesbians and gay men. In: J. Gonsiorek & J. Weinrich (Eds.), "Homosexuality: Research implications for public policy" (pp. 60-80). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  8. ^ Kyes, K.B. & Tumbelaka, L. (1994). Comparison of Indonesian and American college students' attitudes toward homosexuality. Psychological Reports, 74, 227-237.
  9. ^ Studies finding that heterosexual men usually exhibit more hostile attitudes toward gay men and lesbians than do heterosexual women:
    :*Herek, G. M. (1994). Assessing heterosexuals’ attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. In "B. Greene and G.M. Herek (Eds.) Psychological perspectives on lesbian and gay issues: Vol. 1 Lesbian and gay psychology: Theory, research, and clinical applications." Thousands Oaks, Ca: Sage.
    :*Kite, M.E. (1984). Sex differences in attitudes toward homosexuals: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Homosexuality, 10 (1-2), 69-81.
    :*Morin, S., & Garfinkle, E. (1978). Male homophobia. Journal of Social Issues, 34 (1), 29-47.
    :*Thompson, E., Grisanti, C., & Pleck, J. (1985). Attitudes toward the male role and their correlates. Sex Roles, 13 (7/8), 413-427.
    For other correlates, see:
    :*Larson et al. (1980) Heterosexuals' Attitudes Toward Homosexuality, The Journal of Sex Research, 16, 245-257
    :*Herek, G. (1988), Heterosexuals' Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men, The Journal of Sex Research, 25, 451-477
    :*Kite, M.E., & Deaux, K., 1986. Attitudes toward homosexuality: Assessment and behavioral consequences. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 7, 137-162
    :*Haddock, G., Zanna, M. P., & Esses, V. M. (1993). Assessing the structure of prejudicial attitudes: The case of attitudes toward homosexuals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1105-1118.
    :See also: Lewis, Gregory B., Black-White Differences in Attitudes toward Homosexuality and Gay Rights, Public Opinion Quarterly, Volume 67, Number 1, Pp. 59-78
  10. ^ Herek, G.M. (1991). Stigma, prejudice, and violence against lesbians and gay men. In: J. Gonsiorek & J. Weinrich (Eds.), "Homosexuality: Research implications for public policy" (pp. 60-80). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  11. ^ Kyes, K.B. & Tumbelaka, L. (1994). Comparison of Indonesian and American college students' attitudes toward homosexuality. Psychological Reports, 74, 227-237.
  12. ^ The Michigan-based National Socialist Movement'
  13. ^ Southern Poverty Law Center
  14. ^ The Knight's Party Platform
  15. ^ The Observer
  16. ^ American Psychological Association Council of Representatives (1997). "Resolution on Appropriate Therapeutic Responses to Sexual Orientation". (Adopted August 14, 1997)
  17. ^ Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (2006). "ReligiousTolerance.org: REPARATIVE & SIMILAR THERAPIES". Retrieved June 6, 2006.
  18. ^ Strauss, Lehman, Litt.D., F.R.G.S. "Homosexuality: The Christian Perspective".
  19. ^ "Roman Catholics and Homosexuality", Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (2006)
  20. ^ "Teaching about Procreation and Chastity: Homosexuality", The Church of Jesus-Christ of Latter-day Saints. Home & Family.
  21. ^ Shafran, Rabbi Avi. "Jewish Law: Marital Problems". Jewish Law Commentary: Examining Halacha, Jewish Issues, and Secular Law.
  22. ^ "Islam and Homosexuality", Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (2005).
  23. ^ In Support of Equal Marriage Rights for AllPDF (34.2 KiB), United Church of Christ (2005). Resolution by General Synod 25 in Atlanta.
  24. ^ Pickett, Brent (2002). "Homosexuality: Natural Law". The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2002 Edition). Edward N. Zalta (ed.). Retrieved May 12, 2006.
  25. ^ Vitagliano, Ed (2003). "Morality: hanging by a thread". American Family Association Journal (April 2003). Retrieved June 6, 2006.
  26. ^ Flynn, Eileen P (2000). "Responding to the ‘Gay Agenda’". America: The National Catholic Weekly (Vol. 183 No. 9, September 30, 2000). Retrieved June 6, 2006.

 
 

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