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Encyclopedia > LGBT rights in the United Kingdom

LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality or transgenderism. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


Around the world · By country World laws on homosexuality US laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ... This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ...


History · Groups · Activists LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... Here is a list of gay-rights organizations around the world. ... This article is new. ...


Declaration of Montreal Martina Navrátilová and Mark Tewksbury read the Declaration of Montreal at the opening ceremonies of the World Outgames. ...


Same-sex relationships Same-sex union can refer to: same-sex marriage -- the civil or religious rites of marriage that make it equivalent to opposite-sex marriages in all aspects. ...


Marriage · Adoption   CA, CT, MD, NY, NJ, OR, RI, VT, WA See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live... LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ...


Opposition · Discrimination Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Homophobia is a term used to describe: A culturally determined phobia manifesting as fear, revulsion, or contempt for desire or physical love between people of the same sex. ...


Violence John Atherton, Bishop of Waterford and Lismore, was hanged for sodomy under a law that he had helped to institute. ...


Image File history File links Scale_of_justice. ...

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Attitudes to homosexuality in the United Kingdom have liberalised considerably in recent years, with equal ages of consent for heterosexual and homosexuals, civil partnerships and large gay communities in British cities marking this out. A Eurobarometer survey published in December 2006 showed that 46% of Britons surveyed support same-sex marriage and 33% recognise the right of same-sex couples to adopt, close to the EU-wide average of 44% and 33%. [1]

Contents

1950s

In the early 1950s, the police were actively enforcing the laws affecting homosexual men (some say this was a result of Central Intelligence Agency pressure following the BurgessMaclean spy scandal).[citation needed] This led to a number of high-profile arrests and trials. “CIA” redirects here. ... Guy Francis De Moncy Burgess (16 April 1911 – 30 August 1963) was a British-born intelligence officer and double agent who worked for the Soviet Union and was part of the Cambridge Five spy ring that betrayed allied secrets to the Soviets before and during the Cold War. ... Donald Duart Maclean Donald Duart Maclean (25 May 1913 – 6 March 1983) was a career British diplomat turned Soviet intelligence agent. ...


In particular, in 1953, Michael Pitt-Rivers and Peter Wildeblood were arrested and charged with having committed specific acts of indecency with Edward McNally and John Reynolds; they were also accused of conspiring with Edward Montagu (the 3rd Baron Montagu of Beaulieu) to commit these offences. The Director of Public Prosecutions gave his assurance that Reynolds and McNally would not be prosecuted in any circumstances. The trial of Edward Montagu, Michael Pitt-Rivers and Peter Wildeblood began on 15 March 1954 in the hall of Winchester Castle. All three defendants were convicted. Peter Wildeblood (19 May 1923 - 14 November 1999) was a British-Canadian journalist, novelist, playwright, and gay rights campaigner. ... Edward John Barrington Douglas-Scott-Montagu, 3rd Baron Montagu of Beaulieu (born October 20, 1926) is a British peer known for founding the National Motor Museum. ... The Director of Public Prosecutions is the officer charged with the prosecution of criminal offences in several criminal jurisdictions around the world. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A castle in Winchester called Winchester Castle ...


The Sunday Times published an article entitled "Law and Hypocrisy" on 28 March 1954 that dealt with this trial and its outcome. Soon after, on 10 April 1954, the New Statesman printed an article called "The Police and the Montagu Case". A month after the Montagu trial the Home Secretary agreed to appoint a committee to examine and report on the law covering homosexual offences. The official announcement in the House of Commons was made on 18 April 1954 by Sir Hugh Lucas-Tooth. In August 1954, the Home Office appointed a departmental committee of 15 men and women "to consider… the law and practice relating to homosexual offences and the treatment of persons convicted of such offences by the courts." The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Statesman is a left-of-centre political weekly published in London. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ...


The Report of the Departmental Committee on Homosexual Offences and Prostitution (better known as the Wolfenden Report) was published on 3 September 1957 and recommended that "homosexual behavior between consenting adults in private should no longer be a criminal offence", finding that "homosexuality cannot legitimately be regarded as a disease, because in many cases it is the only symptom and is compatible with full mental health in other respects." The Report of the Departmental Committee on Homosexual Offences and Prostitution (better known as the Wolfenden report, after Lord Wolfenden, the chairman of the committee) was published in Britain on September 3, 1957 after a succession of well-known men, including Peter Wildeblood, were convicted of homosexual offences. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In October 1957, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Geoffrey Fisher, spoke in support of the Wolfenden Report, saying that "There is a sacred realm of privacy… into which the law, generally speaking, must not intrude. This is a principle of the utmost importance for the preservation of human freedom, self-respect, and responsibility." The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Geoffrey Worth Fisher, Baron Fisher of Lambeth (May 5, 1887 – September 15, 1972) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1945 to 1961. ...


The first parliamentary debate on the Wolfenden Report was initiated on 4 December 1957 by Frank Pakenham. Of the seventeen peers who spoke in the debate, eight broadly supported the recommendations in the Wolfenden Report. The Lord Chancellor, Lord Kilmuir, speaking for the government, doubted that there would be much public support for implementing the recommendations and stated that further research was required. December 4th redirects here. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Francis Aungier Frank Pakenham, 7th Earl of Longford, KG, PC (December 5, 1905 - August 3, 2001) was a politician, author, and social reformer. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ...


In 1958, the Home Office asked sociologist Richard Hauser to survey homosexuality in Great Britain. One suggestion that arose from Hauser's work was that "the poor quality of the normal relationships between men and women in… society is responsible for much avoidable homosexuality". The Homosexual Law Reform Society was founded on 12 May 1958, mainly to campaign for the implementation of the Wolfenden Committee's recommendations. The Homosexual Law Reform Society was an organisation that campaigned in the United Kingdom for changes in the laws that crimialised homosexual relations between men. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


1960s

In 1965, in the House of Lords, Lord Arran proposed the decriminalization of homosexual acts. In 1966, Humphry Berkeley MP proposed the same in the House of Commons; he ascribed his defeat in the 1966 general election to the unpopularity of this action. However, in the new Parliament, the maverick Labour MP Leo Abse took up the issue and used his mastery of Parliamentary tactics to ensure that the Bill progressed. The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... Humphry John Berkeley (February 21, 1926 - November 14, 1994) was a British Politician. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... Leopold Abse (born April 22, 1917) is a British politician from Wales. ...


After almost ten years of intense campaigning, the Sexual Offences Bill was put before parliament in 1967 in order to implement some of the Wolfenden Committee's recommendations. Lord Arran, a sponsor of the Bill, made the following remarks at the third reading in the Lords:

Because, of the Bill now to be enacted, perhaps a million human beings will be able to live in greater peace. I find this an awesome and marvellous thing. The late Oscar Wilde, on his release from Reading Gaol, wrote to a friend:
"Yes, we shall win in the end; but the road will be long and red with monstrous martyrdoms."
My Lords, Mr. Wilde was right: the road has been long and the martyrdoms many, monstrous and bloody. Today, please God! sees the end of that road. I ask one thing and I ask it earnestly. I ask those who have, as it were, been in bondage and for whom the prison doors are now open to show their thanks by comporting themselves quietly and with dignity. This is no occasion for jubilation; certainly not for celebration. Any form of ostentatious behaviour; now or in the future any form of public flaunting, would be utterly distasteful and would, I believe, make the sponsors of the Bill regret that they have done what they have done. Homosexuals must continue to remember that while there may be nothing bad in being a homosexual, there is certainly nothing good. Lest the opponents of the Bill think that a new freedom, a new privileged class, has been created, let me remind them that no amount of legislation will prevent homosexuals from being the subject of dislike and derision, or at best of pity. We shall always, I fear, resent the odd man out. That is their burden for all time, and they must shoulder it like men - for men they are.

The Sexual Offences Act 1967 was passed, decriminalizing certain homosexual activities between adults but established a higher age of consent for homosexuals (21 at the time) and "in private" was interpreted strictly by the courts, being taken to exclude acts taking place in a room in a hotel, for example, and in private homes where a third person was present — even where that person was in a different room. However, the 1967 Act did not extend to Scotland and Northern Ireland where all homosexual activities remained illegal. Campaigning was therefore continued by organizations such as the Campaign for Homosexual Equality and the Gay Liberation Front with the aim of attaining full equality. The Sexual Offences Act 1967 is an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom (citation 1967 c. ... The Campaign for Homosexual Equality (CHE) is a national gay rights organisation in the United Kingdom which aims to promote legal and social equality for lesbians, gays and bisexuals. ... Gay Liberation Front Poster, New York 1970 Gay Liberation Front (GLF) was the name of a number of Gay Liberation groups, the first of which was formed in New York City in 1969, immediately after the Stonewall riots. ...


1970s

In 1979, the Home Office Policy Advisory Committee's Working Party report Age of Consent in relation to Sexual Offences recommended that the age of consent for homosexual activities should be 18.


Legislation was introduced to legalise homosexual activities in Scotland on the same terms as England and Wales. The legislation was eventually enacted in 1980.


1980s

The 1980s saw both expansions and restrictions of gay rights in the UK. Northern Ireland's law against homosexual activities was amended in 1982. However, the 1988 passage of Section 28 forbade "promotion of homosexuality" by any local authority and "the teaching in any maintained school of the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship". Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... In Britain, the term maintained school is short for grant-maintained, meaning that its funding comes from the local education authority. ...


1990s

In February 1994, Conservative MP Edwina Currie tabled an amendment to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Bill to equalise the age of consent at 16. Many Labour MPs supported the amendment, including Tony Blair, who said: The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... Edwina Currie Edwina Currie Jones née Cohen, (born 13 October 1946) is a former British Member of Parliament. ... While the phrase age of consent typically does not appear in legal statutes,[1] when used with reference to criminal law the age of consent is the minimum age at which a person is considered to be capable of legally giving informed consent to any contract or behaviour regulated by... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...

"People are entitled to think that homosexuality is wrong, but they are not entitled to use the criminal law to force that view upon others... A society that has learned, over time, racial and sexual equality can surely come to terms with equality of sexuality."

Edwina Currie's amendment was defeated by 307 votes to 280. Those who voted for it included John Smith and Neil Kinnock, Paddy Ashdown and William Hague. Those voting against included David Blunkett and Ann Taylor. John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon GCMG KBE PC (born 27 February 1941), commonly known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician native of British India. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... (Winifred) Ann Taylor, Baroness Taylor of Bolton, PC (born 2 July 1947) is a British politician, and was Labour Member of Parliament for Dewsbury until 2005. ...


This vote was followed immediately by one on Sir Anthony Durant's amendment to lower the age of consent to 18. This was passed by 427 votes to 162, and supporters included Michael Howard and John Major. It was opposed by such MPs as John Redwood, Michael Heseltine and John Gummer. An amendment tabled by Simon Hughes which was intended to equalise the age of consent for homosexuals and heterosexuals at 17 was not voted upon. The Bill as a whole was given a second reading in the Lords by 290 votes to 247. Lord Longford then sought to reintroduce 21 as the minimum age in the Lords, but this was defeated by 176 votes to 113. An amendment by the deputy Labour leader in the House of Lords, Lord MacIntosh of Haringey, that would have equalised the age of consent at 16, was rejected by 245 votes to 71. The Rt Hon. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH, PC (born 29 March 1943) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the British Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. ... The Right Honourable John Redwood Dr. John Alan Redwood (born June 15, 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician, Member of Parliament for Wokingham and formerly Shadow Secretary of State for Deregulation in the Shadow Cabinet. ... Michael Heseltine walks out of the cabinet meeting having resigned, January 9, 1986 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... This article or section may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to be clearer or more simplified. ... Simon Hughes. ... Francis Aungier Frank Pakenham, 7th Earl of Longford, KG, PC (December 5, 1905 - August 3, 2001) was a politician, author, and social reformer. ...


In its decision of 1 July 1997 in the case of Sutherland v. the United Kingdom, the European Commission of Human Rights found that Articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights were violated by a discriminatory age of consent, on the ground that there was no objective and reasonable justification for maintaining a higher minimum age for male homosexual acts. On 13 October 1997, the Government submitted to the European Court of Human Rights that it would in the summer of 1998 propose a Bill to Parliament for a reduction of the age of consent for homosexual acts from 18 to 16. July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Euan Sutherland was a young gay man who took the United Kingdom government to the European Court of Human Rights, aided by the campaigning organisation Stonewall, in the mid-1990s, to fight to equalise the age of consent for gay sex in the UK. The July 1, 1997 decision in... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by...


In June 1998, the Crime and Disorder Bill was put before Parliament. Ann Keen proposed amendments that would lower the age of consent to 16. The House of Commons accepted these provisions with a majority of 207, but they were rejected by the House of Lords with a majority of 168. Subsequently, a Sexual Offences (Amendment) Bill was introduced on 16 December 1998 and, again, the equalisation of the age of consent was endorsed on 25 January 1999 by the House of Commons, but was rejected on 14 April 1999 by the House of Lords. The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Those campaigning against the amendment said they were simply acting to protect children. Baroness Young, the leader of the campaign against the amendment, said "Homosexual practices carry great health risks to young people." Janet Young, Baroness Young (23 October 1926 – 6 September 2002), was a British Conservative politician. ...


The government reintroduced the Bill in 1999 and threatened to use the Parliament Act to enact it regardless of the opinion of the Lords. The Lords rejected the bill again in November 2000. The Speaker of the House of Commons invoked the Parliament Act on Thursday 30 November 2000; the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 2000 received Royal Assent a few hours later. The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 2000 is an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom. ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ...


2000s

On 18 November 2004, the Civil Partnership Act 2004 was enacted, allowing same-sex couples enter into a civil union with all the rights of full marriage. The first civil partnership ceremony under the Civil Partnership Act 2004 is thought to have taken place at 11:00 (GMT) on the 5 December 2005 between Matthew Roche and Christopher Cramp at St Barnabas Hospice, Worthing, West Sussex.[1] The usual 14 day waiting period was waived as Roche was suffering from a terminal illness. He died the next day.[2] Despite this bold step, several gay rights groups including OutRage! and The Queer Youth Alliance in the United Kingdom have objected to the failure of the legislation to allow for same-sex marriage. Some activists such as Peter Tatchell have gone as far to say that a separate system of partnership rights 'just for same sex couples' could be compared to a form of Apartheid. Other LGBT groups, however, have not made this a key campaign issue. November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Civil Partnership Act 2004 grants legal status to gay and lesbian couples in the United Kingdom. ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... Worthing is a large town and a local government district in West Sussex, England. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence OutRage! is a direct action campaigning group in the United Kingdom which was formed to fight for the rights of lesbian, gay and bisexual people. ... The Queer Youth Alliance (Q.Y.A.) is a national non-profit making organisation that is run by and for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered (LGBT) Young People and is based in the United Kingdom. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      Peter Gary Tatchell (born 25 January 1952) is a British human rights activist, who is best known internationally for his attempts to perform a citizens arrest... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ...


Other developments during this period included the introduction in 2003 of workplace protection from discrimination as well as the repeal of section 28, the repeal of discriminatory sexual offences laws, the setting up of the Commission for Equality and Human Rights to cover all equality strands and the agreement to introduce protection in the field of goods, facilities and services from October 2006. This period also saw the introduction of rules allowing same sex adoption for England and Wales with separate legislation passed for Scotland[3]. Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... This article is about the country. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II...


Other initiatives have included action by government departments such as the setting up of the Sexual Orientation and Gender Advisory Group within the Department of Health, the coming into force in 2005 of a measure passed in 2003 ensuring that a court has to treat as an aggravating feature for sentence, hostility based on sexual orientation, guidance from the Crown Prosecution Service, a policy statement from the CPS on dealing with homophobic crime and a commitment form the government to work for LGBT rights at an international level [4] The Crown Prosecution Service, or CPS, is a non-ministerial department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences in England and Wales. ... The Crown Prosecution Service, or CPS, is a non-ministerial department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences in England and Wales. ...


Notes

  1. ^ First civil union in the United Kingdom
  2. ^ Partner of first civil union in the United Kingdom dies
  3. ^ Section 31 of the Adoption and Children (Scotland) Bill, passed by the Scottish Parliament on 7 December 2006
  4. ^ PROMOTING LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER RIGHTS OVERSEAS (06/02/06)

References

  • Sutherland v. United Kingdom - 25186/94 [2001] ECHR 234 (27 March 2001)
  • DTI Women and Equality

March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Metropolitan Community Church vicar Debbie Gaston (right) with partner Elaine celebrating their Civil Partnership outside Brighton Town Hall on Dec 21, 2005 Civil partnerships in the United Kingdom, granted under the Civil Partnership Act 2004, give same-sex couples rights and responsibilities identical to civil marriage. ... The United Kingdom does not currently offer same-sex marriage, though it does provide civil partnerships to same-sex couples that provide all the rights and responsibilities of marriage. ... Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28. ... The Gender Recognition Act 2004 is an Act of Parliament of the British Parliament which allows transsexual people to change their legal gender. ... Gay Liberation Front Poster, New York 1970 Gay Liberation Front (GLF) was the name of a number of Gay Liberation groups, the first of which was formed in New York City in 1969, immediately after the Stonewall riots. ... Hall-Carpenter Archives logo The Hall-Carpenter Archives are named after the authors Marguerite Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) and Edward Carpenter (1844-1929). ... The United Kingdom has a long and established tradition of respect for its citizens human rights. ...

External links

  • Database of Britain's openly gay and lesbian politicians

 
 

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