FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > LGBT rights in Israel

LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality, bisexuality, or transgenderism. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


Around the world World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ...


By country This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ...


History · Groups · Activists LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Here is a list of gay-rights organizations around the world. ... This article is new. ...


Declaration of Montreal Martina Navrátilová and Mark Tewksbury read the Declaration of Montreal at the opening ceremonies of the World Outgames. ...


Same-sex relationships Same-sex union can refer to: same-sex marriage -- the civil or religious rites of marriage that make it equivalent to opposite-sex marriages in all aspects. ...


Marriage · Adoption International recognition Civil unions and domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Civil unions legal, same-sex marriage debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term... LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ...


Opposition · Discrimination LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT rights opposition refers to various movements or attitudes which oppose the extension of certain rights to lesbian and gay people, and by extension to bisexuals, and... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ...


Violence John Atherton, Bishop of Waterford and Lismore, was hanged for sodomy under a law that he had helped to institute. ...


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Israel is considered to be the most advanced and tolerant in the Middle East in terms of gay rights. In November 2005, a groundbreaking court decision in Israel ruled that a lesbian spouse could officially adopt a child born to her current partner, by artificial insemination from an anonymous sperm donor; this ruling was despite protests by the Orthodox Jewish parliamentary parties (which are a minority). Common law marriage has already been similarly achieved (which grants most of the official marriage rights to the spouse), but full official gay marriage has not yet been sanctioned. However, same-sex marriages performed elsewhere are recognized. A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A lesbian is a woman who is romantically and sexually attracted only to other women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Different types of sperm cells: A) spermatozoon (motile), B) spermatium (non-motile), C) fertilization tube with sperm nuclei The term sperm is derived from the Greek word spermos (Latin: sperma) meaning seed and refers to the male reproductive cells. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... In many jurisdictions, common-law marriage is a legal provision whereby two people who are eligible to marry, but who do not obtain a legal marriage, are nevertheless considered married under certain conditions. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ...


Israel, Jordan, Turkey, and Cyprus are the only countries in the Middle East where homosexuality between consenting adults in private is not illegal and homosexuals are not persecuted by the authorities. Cyprus had been forced to follow suit as a condition of joining the European Union.[1] While homosexual conduct is legal in Jordan, the law does not require punishment for honor killings of homosexuals. In most other Middle Eastern countries homosexuality is illegal, often punishable by flogging and even hanging. For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Persecution is persistent mistreatment of an individual or group by another group. ... Jordan is generally seen as a moderate nation in the Muslim Southeast Asia. ... An honor killing is a murder, nearly exclusively of a woman, who has been perceived as having brought dishonor to her family. ...


Until 2001, Israel had been the only country in Asia where homosexuals are protected with anti-discrimination laws, which they now share with Japan. Israel remains the only one in the Middle East with such laws.

Contents

Military service

Unlike many other democratic nations, the armed forces of Israel allow service without any distinction based on sexual orientation. Since 1993, homosexuals have been allowed to openly serve in the military, including special units. Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ...


In 1956, two soldiers were put on military trial on charges of sexual intercourse 'against nature' and were supposed to be put in military prison for one year, but the punishment was reduced on the grounds that 'homosexuality is a disease, not a crime'. Until the late 80s, the commanders had to report to the military psychiatric department about homosexual soldiers. The vast majority of psychological and psychiatric organizations in Israel and worldwide no longer consider homosexuality to be a disease or defect.[citation needed] Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Israeli youth can seek exemption from military service by volunteering for national service. Since June 2006, The Association of Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals, and Transgenders in Israel (Agudah) qualifies as such a service. [2] However, a steadily increasing number of gay recruits choose to do full military service, often in combat units. The Ma'ariv newspaper reported that one of the largest units in the Israeli army, an intelligence processing unit, is well known for the large number of uncloseted LGBT soldiers serving in it.


In a poll conducted in 2006, half of gay soldiers were found to be harassed during their army duty. Most cases involved verbal harassment.[1]


Sodomy

The State of Israel inherited its sodomy or "buggery" law from British influence, but there is no record that it was ever enforced against homosexual acts that took place between consenting adults in private. In 1963 the Israeli Supreme Court ruled that this law could not be enforced; however, in certain cases defendants were found guilty of "sodomy" (which according to Israeli law includes oral sex as well), apparently by way of plea bargains: those defendants had been indicted for more serious sexual offences. There were also cases of soldiers tried for homosexual acts in military courts. The ban on consentual same-sex sexual acts was formally repealed by the national legislative assembly Knesset in 1988.[3] The age of consent for both heterosexuals and homosexuals is sixteen years of age. François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court is at the head of the court system in the State of Israel. ... Oral sex consists of all sexual activities that involve the use of the mouth, which may include use of the tongue, teeth, and throat, to stimulate genitalia. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Age of consent laws Worldwide While the phrase age of consent typically does not appear in legal statutes,[1] when used with reference to criminal law the age of consent is the minimum age at which a person is considered to be capable of legally giving informed consent to any...


Employment discrimination

In 1992 legislation was introduced to prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, with some exemptions for religious organizations. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Employment discrimination refers to employment practices that are prohibited by law such as bias in hiring, promotion, job assignment, termination, compensation, and various types of harassment. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, normally conceived of as falling into several significant categories based around the sex or gender that the individual finds attractive. ...


Marriage

Main article: Same-sex marriage in Israel

Israeli law recognizes same-sex marriages performed elsewhere. It is the only country in the Middle East and all of Asia to do so. It does not, however, allow same-sex couples to marry. It should be noted that civil marriage doesn't exist in Israel for heterosexual couples, either, and therefore no marriage not sanctioned by religious authorities can take place within Israel. (This restriction forces not only gay couples, but also all mixed-religion heterosexual couples, to marry outside of the country.) Same-sex marriage in Israel is not currently legal. ... Israel has granted unregistered cohabitation for same-sex couples since 1994, in the form of common law marriage, a status that until then was only extended to heterosexual couples. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many people who (usually) are in a sexual relationship. ...


The State of Israel allows foreign partners of its homosexual citizenry to receive residency permits. The Civil Service Commission extends spousal benefits and pensions to the partners of homosexual employees. The Israeli State Attorney's Office has extended the spousal exemption from property-transfer taxes to same-sex couples. Israel's attorney general has granted legal recognition to same-sex couples in financial and other business matters. Attorney General Meni Mazuz said the couples will be treated the same as common-law spouses, recognizing them as legal units for tax, real estate, and financial purposes. Mazuz made his decision by refusing to appeal a district court ruling in an inheritance case that recognized the legality of a same-sex union, his office said in a statement. Mazuz did differentiate, however, between recognizing same-sex unions for financial and practical purposes, as he did, and changing the law to officially sanction the unions, which would be a matter for parliament, according to the statement. Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now a state), and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Menachem Mazuz (Hebrew: מנחם מזוז) (born 1955) is an Israeli jurist serving as Israels Attorney General. ...


The city of Tel Aviv recognizes unmarried couples, including gays and lesbians, as family units and grants them discounts for municipal services. Under the bylaw, unmarried couples qualify for the same discounts on day care and the use of swimming pools, sports facilities, and other city-sponsored activities that married couples enjoy. Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...


On January 29, 2007, following a High Court ruling ordering them to do so, Jerusalem registered its first gay couple, Avi and Binyamin Rose. [4]


Children

On January 10, 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that a lesbian couple is able to legally adopt each other's children. During the past 15 years that Tal and Avital Yaros-Hakak have lived together, they have had a total of three children. The couple petitioned the Tel Aviv Family Court for the right to formally adopt each other's children in 1997, but the request was rejected because Israel's adoption law had no provisions for same-sex couples. The couple appealed. While they failed to get a favorable ruling in the Tel Aviv District Court, the Supreme Court accepted the case. Citing Article 25 of the Adoption Law, the Yaros-Hakaks argued that the law allows for "special circumstances" for adoption when it is for the good of the child, even if the child's parents are still alive. The only condition is that the person seeking to adopt be single. The couple argued that since the state does not recognize same-sex marriage, they are single by law. The Yaros-Hakaks added that adoption was in the best interest of the children if one of their natural mothers should die. The Supreme Court of Israel agreed, ruling 7-2 in favor of the couple. The Supreme Court (Hebrew: בית המשפט העליון, Beit Hamishpat Haelyon ) is at the head of the court system in the State of Israel. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ...


Following the supreme court ruling, a lesbian couple was allowed to adopt each other's biological children on February 12, 2006. Before that, gay partners of parents were granted guardianship over their partner's children. February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Politics

Since the 1970s there has been an active gay rights movement that has often affiliated itself with the Israeli feminist movement and various liberal and social democratic political parties.[2] The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Feminists redirects here. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ...


Today, Israel's Labor Party, Meretz-Yachad (and previously the now-defunct Shinui party) all support gay rights. Other minor liberal or progressive political parties support a similar platform as well. The Israel Labor Party (Hebrew: העבודה, Ha‘Avoda (Labor), officially מפלגת העבודה הישראלית, Mifleget Ha‘Avoda HaIsra’elit) is a center-left political party in Israel. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Meretz. ... Shinui (שינוי) (original full name: Tenua le-Shinui ve Yozma and then to Shinui-Mifleget ha-Merkaz) is a Zionist, secular and anti-clerical, free market liberal party in Israel. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also...


Nevertheless, there still have been anti-gay politicians. In 1997, President Ezer Weizman compared homosexuality to alcoholism in front of high school students.[3] This provoked major controversy and the President received numerous calls from civil rights activists and liberal Knesset members. Shortly following, 300 people demonstrated outside of Weizman's residence, demanding his resignation.[4] The President of the State of Israel (‎, Nesi HaMedina, lit. ... Ezer Weizman (עזר ויצמן) (Tel Aviv, June 15, 1924 – Caesarea Maritima, April 24, 2005) was the seventh President of the State of Israel (1993-2000). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ...


Community visibility

Israel has an active gay community, with well attended annual gay pride festivals [5] held in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem since 1998. Pride events are also held regularly in Haifa, Beer Sheva, Eilat and Rosh Pina. Baton twirlers perform in the 2002 Divers/Cité pride parade in downtown Montreal A pride parade is part of a festival or ceremony held by the LGBT community of a city to commemorate the struggle for gay liberation, gay rights, and gay pride. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Hebrew חֵיפָה Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Beersheba or Beer Sheva (Hebrew באר שבע; Arabic بئر السبع Biʾr as-Sabʿ) is a city in Israel. ... Hebrew אילת Founded in 1951 Government City (from 1959) District South Population 55,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 80,000 dunams (80 km²) Mayor Meir Yitzhak Halevi North Beach, Eilat, from southwest. ... Rosh Pina is a town in northern Israel first settled by Romanian Jews in 1882. ...


The Jerusalem parade gained international coverage when a three marchers were stabbed in 2005. The perpetrator was subsequently sentenced to twelve years in prison. [6] An attempt by Jerusalem's mayor, a Haredi Jew, to thwart Jerusalem pride in June 2005 had been challenged in the courts. The mayor lost and was ordered to contribute funds to the event. [7] Haredi Judaism, also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Judaism. ...


The LGBT community in Israel was also brought to the media's attention following the winning of the Eurovision Song Contest in 1998 by Dana International, an Israeli transsexual. The modern logo was introduced for the 2004 Contest (in Istanbul) to create a consistent visual identity. ... Dana International (Hebrew: דנה אינטרנשיונל; stage name of Sharon Cohen, born Yaron Cohen (male) in Tel Aviv, Israel on February 2, 1972) is an Israeli transsexual pop singer of Yemenite origin, who won the 1998 Eurovision Song Contest for her song Diva. Next to original songs, Dana International is known for her...


The World Pride Festival [8] was planned for Jerusalem in August 2005, despite protests and opposition from religious groups of the three major religions in Jerusalem. However, it was postponed due to the Israel's pull out from Gaza Strip, which required the presence of most Israeli police forces and thus leave the parade with little to no security. It, however, had been plagued with threats of violence, as well as consistent grandstanding against it by some Jewish, Muslim, and Christian leaders and members of the Knesset. [9] For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all...


In November 2006, more than two thousand members of the Haredi Judaism sect jammed into streets in an Orthodox neighbourhood in a show of force aimed at pressuring authorities into cancelling the gay pride parade to be held in Jerusalem. About a dozen people have been reported injured [10]. Haredi or chareidi Judaism is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism. ... Gay pride or LGBT pride refers to a world wide movement and philosophy asserting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


The LGBT community is highly visible in Tel-Aviv.[citation needed]


Palestinian issues

Some Palestinian gays and lesbians are reported to be hiding illegally in Israel in order to escape extreme intolerance, physical abuse, death, or disowning by their families that they face in their communities. Significant expatriate groups exist in Tel Aviv and Netanya, where many live with their Israeli partners who help keep their presence in Israel hidden from the police (who will pursue them not for their sexual orientation, but for illegal stay in the state).[11],[12],[13] Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Early morning in Netanya, Israel Netanya (Hebrew: נְתַנְיָה, Standard Hebrew Nətanya) is a city in the Center District of Israel and is the capital of the Sharon plain. ...


It has also been reported that many in the Palestinian community equate homosexuality with collaboration with Israel. After Palestinian gay men run away, some of them are recruited by the Israeli Security Forces in exchange for financial or administrative favors such as the right of residence. If and when they return to their hometowns, they are often accused of being collaborators and are greatly discriminated against, sometimes arrested and tortured. Even suspicion of collaboration can mean death from fellow Palestinians [14]. One man who returned to Nablus was thrown in a pit and starved to death.[citation needed] A 19-year-old runaway stated in an interview with Israeli television that he had been pressured by the al-Aqsa Martyrs' Brigades to become a suicide bomber in order to ‘purge his moral guilt’, although he had refused.[citation needed] Because of such instances, some Palestinians who are illegally residing Israel are considered security threats and live under virtual house arrest. Some others who do not hold legal residency in Israel hustle as prostitutes. In order to remain out of prison, gay men who remain in Palestinian areas often work as Palestinian police agents to "ferret out" other homosexuals in the region. There are an estimated 300-600 Palestinian homosexuals who have (legally and illegally) found refuge in Israel. [15][16][17] The Israeli Security Forces are several organizations collectively responsible for Israels security. ... A residence may be a house, a place to live, like a nursing home. ... The al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الأقصى) are a Palestinian armed terrorist group closely linked to the Fatah party. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ...


The 2006 movie The Bubble (הבועה) by Eytan Fox touches on the complicated situation of a gay Palestinian man who attempts to live within Israel in Tel Aviv with his Jewish lover. Like many Palestinian gays and lesbians, he is persecuted for being gay in Palestine and persecuted for being Palestinian in Israel. While the movie is not a true story, the story is a reality for many gay and lesbian Palestinians. The Bubble (Hebrew: הבועה) is a 2006 Israeli film by Eytan Fox about a gay love story between an Israeli man and a Palestinian man. ... Eytan Fox in promotional photo for Walk on Water Eytan Fox (Hebrew: איתן פוקס) (born on August 21, 1964) is an Israeli film director. ...


Trivia

  • Etai Pinkas (formerly Meretz Party), member of the Tel Aviv City Council is openly gay. He is also a former Executive Director of The Agudah, an Israeli GLBT rights organization headquartered in the center of downtown Tel Aviv.
  • Uzi Even (Meretz Party), is an openly gay, former member of Knesset and a professor of chemistry in Tel Aviv University.
  • Yossi Avni-Levy is one of several senior Israeli diplomats who are openly gay. Aside from serving as consul in several European countries, he published three successful books (short stories, novellas and a novel) about gay themes under a pseudonym, before finally coming out.
  • Saar-Ran Netanel (Meretz Party), member of the Jerusalem City Council is openly gay.
  • Carsten Damsgaard, Danish ambassador to Israel, is openly gay.
  • On Holocaust Memorial Day 2006, gays and lesbians in Israel were invited to participate in Holocaust memorial services in Europe, acknowledging the tragic persecution of homosexuals by the Nazis. [18]
  • Israel was one of six members of a United Nations committee that supported the Coalition Gaie et Lesbienne du Quebec (Coalition of Gays and Lesbians of Quebec) having consultative status with the United Nations. The other five in favor were Colombia, Peru, Romania, Britain and the United States; and against were Burundi, China, Egypt, Guinea, Pakistan, Qatar, Russia and Sudan. With the majority against, the group's credentials were rejected.[19]
  • Israeli film producers and life partners, Eytan Fox and Gal Uchovsky, have included gay themes in some of their films: Walk on Water, Yossi and Jagger, and The Bubble.[20]

Meretz (מרצ, Hebrew: vitality, energy) was an Israeli leftist secular political party. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... World Agudath Israel (The World Jewish Union), usually known as the Aguda, was established in the early twentieth century as the political arm of Ashkenazi Torah Judaism, in succession to Agudas Shlumei Emunei Yisroel (Union of Faithful Jewry). ... Uzi Even (born October 18, 1940) is an Israeli professor of chemistry and politician. ... Meretz (מרצ, Hebrew: vitality, energy) was an Israeli leftist secular political party. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ... The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... Holocaust Memorial Day may refer to one of several commemorations of the Holocaust. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Eytan Fox in promotional photo for Walk on Water Eytan Fox (Hebrew: איתן פוקס) (born on August 21, 1964) is an Israeli film director. ... Knut Berger, Caroline Peters and Lior Ashkenazi in Walk on Water Walk on Water (Hebrew transliteration: Lalecet Al Hamaim) is an Israeli film released in 2004. ... Yossi & Jagger (Hebrew: יוסי וגאגר)is a 2002 Israeli movie directed by Eytan Fox about soldiers at the Israel-Lebanon border who try to find some peace and solace from the daily routine of war in their freewheeling sexual relationships. ... The Bubble (Hebrew: הבועה) is a 2006 Israeli film by Eytan Fox about a gay love story between an Israeli man and a Palestinian man. ...

Other court rulings

  • The High Court ruled that the partner of a gay employee at El Al, Israel's national airline, is entitled to free airline tickets just as the spouse of any heterosexual employee is.
  • The High Court recognized a lesbian as the adoptive mother of the four-year-old son of her same-sex partner, and ordered the Interior Ministry to register the adoption.
  • An Israeli family court on March 17, 2002 turned down an application from a lesbian couple to have their partnership union declared legal. The couple was united in a civil ceremony in Germany. The women wanted the court to recognize their partnership as a civil marriage, under Israeli law. The court said that since the women are not recognized as a family under Israeli law, the court is not authorized to rule on their case. A government lawyer who was asked by the court to give a legal opinion on the case on behalf of the Israeli government said that the state objected to granting the request.
  • On December 14, 2004, the Nazareth District Court ruled that same-sex couples have the same rights as married couples in inheritance rights. This ruling overturned a Family Court ruling that an elderly man from Kiryat Shmona was not entitled to spousal rights. The man had sought the estate of his late partner, with whom he lived for several decades. The Nazareth judges ruled that the term "man and woman" as spelled out in Israel's inheritance law also includes same sex couples. Judges Nissim Maman and Gabriela Levy, who issued the majority opinion, based their decision on a loose interpretation of the term "partner" as defined in other court rulings, such as those dealing with issues related to employee benefits, and thus applied the interpretation to the inheritance law. The acting president of the Nazareth District Court, Menachem Ben-David, issued the minority opinion, arguing that the legal text should not be interpreted "contrary to the lingual significance." A government spokesperson said the ruling will be appealed.
  • In December 2004, the Tel Aviv District Court ruled that the government cannot deport the Colombian partner of a gay Israeli man. The 32-year-old Colombian entered Israel on a visitors visa which has long expired and the Interior Ministry had ordered him deported. His partner is an Israeli citizen and a soldier in the Israel Defense Forces. The couple filed an emergency petition with the Tel Aviv District Court. The men were represented by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel. Judge Uzi Vogelman ruled that the government had acted illegally in attempting to deport the man. In 1999 High Court ruling established that the ministry could not deport foreign nationals married to Israeli citizens. Vogelman's decision extends that to apply to common-law marriages, including same-sex couples.

The Supreme Court (Hebrew: בית המשפט העליון, Beit Hamishpat Haelyon ) is at the head of the court system in the State of Israel. ... Categories: Airline stubs | Companies of Israel | Transportation in Israel | Airlines of Israel ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ... Since 1 August 2001, Germany has allowed registered partnerships for same-sex couples. ... Hebrew נָצְרַת (Natzrat) (Standard) Náẓərat Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Name Meaning Ancient word in Hebrew Government City District North Population 64,800[1] (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Qiryat Shemona (קרית שמונה; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Shmona) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ... Entry visa valid in Schengen treaty countries. ... The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (Hebrew: האגודה לזכויות האזרח) was created as an independent non-partisan organization to protect human rights and civil rights in Israel and the territories under its control. ...

See also

Same-sex marriage in Israel is not currently legal. ... Israel has granted unregistered cohabitation for same-sex couples since 1994, in the form of common law marriage, a status that until then was only extended to heterosexual couples. ... World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ...

References

  1. ^ Poll: 52% of gay soldiers sexually harassed in IDF, Jerusalem Post, 2006-10-22
  2. ^ Queer in the Land of Sodom
  3. ^ Silver, Ian. Homosexuality And Judaism
  4. ^ Israeli president apologizes for his anti-gay statements

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m