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Encyclopedia > LGBT adoption
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LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Queer studies is the study of issues relating to sexual orientation and gender identity. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... “Bisexual” redirects here. ... A transgender woman at New York Citys gay pride parade Transgender (IPA: , from trans (Latin) and gender (English)) is a general term applied to a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies that diverge from the normative gender role (woman or man) commonly, but not always, assigned at... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      This timeline of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) history details notable events in the Common Era West. ... Gay Liberation (or Gay Lib) is the name used to describe the radical lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered movement of the late 1960s and early to mid 1970s in North America, Western Europe, and Australia and New Zealand. ... For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ... This is a timeline of AIDS, including some discussion of early AIDS cases (especially those before 1980). ... Christopher Street Parade Sexuality and gender identity-based cultures concern the culture, knowledge, and references shared by members of sexual minorities or transgendered people by virtue of their membership in those minorities or their state of being transgendered. ... The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ... Front line of Gay Pride parade in Paris, France; June 2005 Gay pride or LGBT pride refers to a world wide movement and philosophy asserting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity. ... For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ... Gay slang or LGBT slang in linguistics refers to a form of English slang used predominantly among LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people. ... A gay village (also gay ghetto or gayborhood) is an urban geographic location with generally recognized boundaries where a large number of gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual people live. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... For the novel by William S. Burroughs, see Queer (novel). ... Questioning is a term that can refer to a person who is questioning his or her sexual identity or sexual orientation. ... World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... A sodomy law is a law that defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The militaries of the world have a variety of responses to gays, lesbians and bisexuals. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... Transgender is generally used as a catch-all umbrella term for a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups centered around the full or partial reversal of gender roles; however, compare other definitions below. ...

Contents

Legal status around the world

Legal status of adoption by same-sex couples in Europe

Adoption by same-sex couples is legal in Guam, Andorra, Belgium, Iceland,[1] the Netherlands, Sweden, South Africa, Spain, the United Kingdom and some parts of Australia, Canada and the United States. In Denmark, Germany,[2] Israel and Norway "stepchild-adoption" is permitted, so that the partner in a civil union can adopt the natural (or sometimes even adopted) child of his or her partner. In the Republic of Ireland, Hungary and some other countries, individual persons, whether heterosexual/homosexual, cohabiting/single may apply for adoption. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1244x1244, 109 KB) based on Image:EU_blank_no_rivers_territories256. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1244x1244, 109 KB) based on Image:EU_blank_no_rivers_territories256. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law...


In February 2006, France's Court of Cassation ruled that both partners in a same-sex relationship can have parental rights over one partner's biological child. The result came from a case where a woman tried to give parental rights of her two daughters to her partner whom she was in a civil union with.[3] In February 2007, France's highest court ruled against a lesbian couple who tried to adopt a child. The court stated that the woman's partner cannot be recognized unless the birth mother withdraws parental rights. The court ruling dismissed the couple's rights to co-parent the child, and stated the only way it could allow adoption would be to legalize same-sex marriage.[4] The Court of Cassation (Cour de cassation in French) is the main court of last resort in France. ...


On June 2, 2006 the Icelandic Parliament voted for a proposal accepting adoption, parenting and assisted insemination treatment for same-sex couples on the same basis as heterosexual couples. No member of the parliament voted against the proposal. The law went into effect on June 27, 2006.


"Second-parent adoption" is a process by which a same-sex partner can adopt her or his partner's biological or adoptive child without terminating the first legal parent's rights. Second-parent adoption was started by the National Center for Lesbian Rights (formerly the Lesbian Rights Project) in the mid-1980s.[5] California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine,[6] Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Washington State and Washington, D.C. explicitly allow second-parent adoption by same-sex couples statewide, either by statute or court ruling.[7] As of May 2007, Colorado allows second-parent adoption by same-sex couples.[8] Courts in many other states have also granted second-parent adoptions to same-sex couples, though there is no statewide law or court decision that guarantees this. In fact, courts within the same state but in different jurisdictions often contradict each other in practice. Single parent adoption by lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals is legal in every state except Florida, which prohibits anyone who is "homosexual" from adopting.[9] Additionally, Utah prohibits adoption by "a person who is cohabiting in a relationship that is not a legally valid and binding marriage,"[10] making it legal for single people to adopt, regardless of sexual orientation, so long as they are not co-habitating in non-marital relationships. Critics of such restrictive policies also point out that in many of the states that have bans on second-parent adoption by same-sex couples, these same couples are still able to act as foster parents.[citation needed] Founded in 1977, the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR) [1] is a non-profit, public interest law firm that litigates precedent-setting cases at the trial and appellate court levels, advocates for equitable public policies affecting the LGBT community, provides free legal assistance to LGBT clients and their legal... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A foster parent is an adult guardian to whom one or more children have been legally entrusted. ...

Legal status of adoption by same-sex couples in North America
US States’ laws on adoption by same-sex couples[11]
State LGBT individual may petition to adopt Same-sex couple may jointly petition Same-sex partner may petition to adopt partner’s child
Alabama Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Alaska Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Arizona Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Arkansas Unclear No explicit prohibition Unclear
California Yes Yes Yes
Colorado Yes Yes Yes
Connecticut Yes Yes Yes
Delaware Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
District of Columbia Yes Yes Yes
Florida No[12] No[12] Probably not[12]
Georgia Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Idaho Yes Unclear Unclear
Illinois Yes Yes Yes
Indiana Yes Yes In some jurisdictions
Iowa Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Kansas Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Kentucky Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Louisiana Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Maine Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Maryland Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Massachusetts Yes[13] Yes[13] Yes[13]
Michigan Yes No No explicit prohibition
Minnesota Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Mississippi Yes No[14] Unclear[14]
Missouri Unclear Unclear Unclear
Montana Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Nebraska Unclear No explicit prohibition No
Nevada Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
New Hampshire Yes In some jurisdictions[15] In some jurisdictions
New Jersey Yes Yes Yes
New Mexico Yes Unclear[16] In some jurisdictions
New York Yes Yes Yes
North Carolina Yes Unclear Unclear
North Dakota Unclear[17] No explicit prohibition[17] Unclear
Ohio Unclear Unclear In some jurisdictions
Oklahoma Yes[18] No explicit prohibition[18] Unclear
Oregon Yes Yes In some jurisdictions
Pennsylvania Yes Unclear Yes
Rhode Island Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
South Carolina Yes Unclear Unclear
South Dakota Yes Unclear Unclear
Tennessee Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Texas Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
Utah Yes No[19] Unclear
Vermont Yes Yes Yes
Virginia Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Washington Yes No explicit prohibition In some jurisdictions
West Virginia Yes No explicit prohibition Unclear
Wisconsin Yes No explicit prohibition No
Wyoming Yes Unclear Unclear

As adoptions are mostly handled by local courts in the United States, some judges and clerks accept or deny petitions to adopt on criteria that vary from other judges and clerks in the same state.[11] Image File history File links Summary based on Samesex Map North America. ... Image File history File links Summary based on Samesex Map North America. ...


In Canada, adoption is within provincial/territorial jurisdiction, and thus the law differs from one province or territory to another. Adoption by same-sex couples is legal in British Columbia,[20] Manitoba,[21] Newfoundland and Labrador,[22] Nova Scotia,[23] Ontario,[24] Quebec,[25] Saskatchewan,[26] and the Northwest Territories.[27] In Alberta, stepchild adoption is allowed.[28] Adoption by same-sex couples is illegal in New Brunswick,[citation needed] Prince Edward Island,[citation needed] and Nunavut.[citation needed] In the Yukon, the law regarding adoption is ambiguous. NDP MP Libby Davies, who is in a same-sex relationship, has campaigned for national uniformity when it comes to same-sex adoption.[citation needed] Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... This article is about Yukon Territory in Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Libby Davies (born February 27, 1953) is a Canadian Member of Parliament for the New Democratic Party, representing the riding of Vancouver East in Vancouver, British Columbia. ...


In Australia, same-sex adoption is legal in the Australian Capital Territory and Western Australia,[29] while only bilological adoption (regardless of type of couple) is possible in Tasmania.[citation needed] The lesbian co-mother or gay co-father(s) can apply to the Family Court of Australia for a parenting order, as ‘other people significant to the care, welfare and development’ of the child. But the lesbian co-mother and gay co-father(s) will be treated in the same way as a social parent is treated under the law; they will not be treated in the same way as a birth parent.[30] In May 2007, the Victorian Law Reform Commission in Victoria released its final report recommending that the laws be modified to allow more people to use assisted reproductive technologies and to allow same-sex couples to adopt and be recognized as parents to their partner's children.[31] In August 2007, Prime Minister John Howard announced plans to introduce a bill into parliament that would ban the recognition of overseas adoptions by same-sex couples.[32][33] The Howard government had unsuccessfully tried to introduce similar laws just before the 2004 election. Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... VIC redirects here. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ...


In New Zealand, preliminary New Zealand Law Commission Reports and white papers have raised the issue already, while Metiria Turei, a Green Party of New Zealand List MP raised the issue in late May 2006.[citation needed] In February 2005, the Greens had suggested that an adoption law reform clause should be added to the Relationships (Statutory References) Act 2005, which equalized heterosexual, lesbian and gay spousal status in New Zealand law and regulatory policy, apart from the Adoption Act 1955.[citation needed] While the measure was unsuccessful, it remains to be seen whether a reintroduced adoption law reform bill on its own would fare differently.[34] Metiria Turei (born 1970) is a member of Parliament for the Green Party of New Zealand. ... Current Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand logo The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ...


A January 2005 ruling of the Israeli Supreme Court allowed step-child adoptions for same-sex couples. Israel previously allowed limited co-guardianship rights for non-biological parents.[35]


In 2007 UK Catholic adoption agencies, comprising around a third of the voluntary sector, have said they will shut if forced to comply with new government legislation requiring them to enlist same-sex couples as potential adoptive parents.[citation needed] The government announced they will have to obey the law, although MP Ruth Kelly allowed them some extra time to comply.[citation needed] Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Ruth Maria Kelly (born 9 May 1968) is a British politician. ...


Financial considerations

A report from UCLA Law School's Williams Institute and the Urban Institute found that forbidding qualified gays, lesbians and bisexuals from adopting or fostering children could cost the United States between $87 million and $130 million per year.[36][37] Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Based in Washington, D.C., the nonpartisan Urban Institute collects data, conducts policy research, evaluates social programs, educates the public on key domestic issues, and provides advice and technical assistance to developing governments abroad. ...


Controversy

There is some controversy surrounding adoption by same-sex couples. The controversy generally concerns whether or not there will be negative consequences for children raised by same-sex couples. Specific questions include the potential for gender confusion, biased sexual orientation, or the general well-being of such children. Social science research has shown that parents' sexual orientation has no bearing on that of children, and that children of LGBT couples fare as well as other children in many objective measures; the American Psychological Association, Child Welfare League of America, American Academy of Pediatrics, and many other relevant professional organizations believe LGBT parents to be as qualified as heterosexuals. Nevertheless, many object to LGBT parenting on moral or cultural grounds, and the issue is considered a part of the West's culture war. For a brief survey of related arguments and sociological studies, see the main article. Many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people are parents. ... Gender identity disorder, as identified by psychologists and medical doctors, is a condition with which a person who has been assigned one gender (usually at birth on the basis of their sex, but compare intersexuality), but identifies as belonging to another gender, or does not conform with the gender role... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... The well-being or quality of life of a population is an important concern in economics and political science. ... The culture war (or culture wars) in American usage is a metaphor used to claim that political conflict is based on sets of conflicting values. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... Parenting by same-sex couples refers to the raising of children by gay, lesbian, or same-sex bisexual couples. ...


Many same-sex couples are already coparenting children without legal status for the nonbiological parent; some advocates thus argue that adoption can simply normalize and add stability to an existing arrangement, while opponents of LGBT parenting contend that such arrangements are harmful to children and should not be encouraged. However, God's laws state that homosexuals should not be allowed to adopt, and therefore those who have played ANY part in this legalization should face death by stoning.


See also


For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


Around the world World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ...


By country This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ...


History · Groups · Activists LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Here is a list of gay-rights organizations around the world. ... A list of LGBT rights activists by country, in alphabetical order. ...


Declaration of Montreal Martina Navrátilová and Mark Tewksbury read the Declaration of Montreal at the opening ceremonies of the World Outgames. ...


Same-sex relationships Same-sex union can refer to: same-sex marriage -- the civil or religious rites of marriage that make it equivalent to opposite-sex marriages in all aspects. ...


Marriage · Adoption One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ...


Opposition · Discrimination LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT rights opposition refers to various movements or attitudes which oppose the extension of certain rights to lesbian and gay people, and by extension to bisexuals, and... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ...


Violence John Atherton, Bishop of Waterford and Lismore, was hanged for sodomy under a law that he had helped to institute. ...


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people are parents. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... LGBT social movements is a collective term for a number of movements that share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality and/or gender variance. ...

Bibliography

  • New Zealand Law Commission: Adoption- Options for Reform: Wellington: New Zealand Law Commission Preliminary Paper No 38: 1999: ISBN 1-877187-44-5

Further reading

  • Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth & K. Lee Lerner (eds) (2006). Gender issues and sexuality : essential primary sources.. Thomson Gale. ISBN 1414403259.  Primary resource collection and readings. Library of Congress. Jefferson or Adams Bldg General or Area Studies Reading Rms
  • Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth & K. Lee Lerner (eds) (2006). Family in society : essential primary sources.. Thomson Gale. ISBN 1414403305.  Primary resource collection and readings. Library of Congress. Jefferson or Adams Bldg General or Area Studies Reading Rms

References

  1. ^ Samtokin:LGBT-Rights
  2. ^ LSVD
  3. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/02/25/ap/world/mainD8FVTSJO0.shtml
  4. ^ http://www.gay.com/news/election/article.html?2007/02/22/6
  5. ^ http://www.nclrights.org/publications/adptn0204.htm
  6. ^ gaycitynews: Maine Supreme Court:Gay couples can adopt
  7. ^ http://www.hrc.org/Template.cfm?Section=Adoption&CONTENTID=18341&TEMPLATE=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm
  8. ^ http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/government/article/0,2777,DRMN_23906_5537407,00.html
  9. ^ http://www.lambdalegal.org/cgi-bin/iowa/documents/record2.html?record=1923
  10. ^ http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE78/htm/78_29002.htm
  11. ^ a b Human Rights Campaign, State Adoption Laws, accessed 2007-09-27
  12. ^ a b c Florida law specifically says "homosexuals" cannot adopt. FLA. STAT. ch. 63.042(3). Upheld in Lofton v. Sect. of the Dept. of Children and Family Services, 358 F.3d 804 (11th Cir. 2004).
  13. ^ a b c State regulatory code allows delaying or denying an adoption based on sexual orientation. With same-sex marriage now legal, how this would apply to married same-sex couples is uncertain.
  14. ^ a b Mississippi allows unmarried adults and married couples to petition, amended in 2000 to prohibit "couples of the same gender" from adopting.
  15. ^ A 1987 New Hampshire Supreme Court ruling found that two unmarried adults may not jointly petition to adopt. There are, however, some judges who have permited same-sex couples to petition upon showing that they will provide a stable and loving home.
  16. ^ Based on the use of gender neutral and "partner" language on their application for adoption, New Mexico may allow same-sex couples to jointly petition.
  17. ^ a b A 2003 law states: "A child-placing agency is not required to perform, assist, counsel, recommend, facilitate, refer or participate in a placement that violates the agency’s written religious or moral convictions or policies." This is expected to allow some agencies to deny placement with LGBT couples and individuals. N.D. CENT. CODE §50-12-03.
  18. ^ a b http://www.hrc.org/issues/parenting/adoptions/1370.htm
  19. ^ Unmarried, cohabitating couples may not petition to adopt.
  20. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  21. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  22. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  23. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  24. ^ Child and Family Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, CHAPTER C.11, as amended; see also definition of spouse in Human Rights Code, R.S.O. 1990, CHAPTER H.19, as amended.
  25. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  26. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  27. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  28. ^ http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/921-e.htm
  29. ^ http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/wa/consol_act/aa1994107/s39.html
  30. ^ http://www.humanrights.gov.au/human_rights/samesex/report/Ch_5.html
  31. ^ http://www.lawreform.vic.gov.au/CA256A25002C7735/All/E98CC6AE987CD2FBCA2572F40009BEDB?OpenDocument&1=30-Current+projects~&2=70-Assisted+Reproduction+and+Adoption~&3=70-Final+Report~
  32. ^ http://www.theage.com.au/news/National/Gay-couples-face-overseas-adoption-ban/2007/08/02/1185648030026.html
  33. ^ http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,22176569-601,00.html
  34. ^ http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3675250a6160,00.html
  35. ^ http://www.365gay.com/newscon05/01/011005isAdopt.htm
  36. ^ G. Gates, et al., Adoption and Foster Care by Gay and Lesbian Couples in the United States, March 2007.
  37. ^ According to the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, "About 30% of children in foster care have severe emotional, behavioral, or developmental problems." "Facts For Families: Foster Care", American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, May 2005.

External links

  • Families Joined by Love - Books and resources for LGBT Families.
  • AICAN - Australian Intercountry Adoption Network
  • National Center for Lesbian Rights - Information about the legal rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and their families, including a legal information hotline.
  • AAP News Release - AAP Says Children of Same-sex Couples Deserve Two Legally Recognized Parents
  • New Position Statement Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association (APA): Adoption and Co-Parenting of Children by Same-Sex Couples (PDF)
  • Let Him Stay - A site that describes a recent effort by GLBTQ parents to overturn Florida's ban.
  • PrideFamilies.com - Resources for LGBT families.
  • The Pride Family Flag web site - The story of the new LGBT family flag.
  • Gay.com - Adoption and Parenting - News and Current Events pertaining to the rights and responsibilities of same-sex parents in adopting and parenting.
  • Family Pride Coalition - The only US-based national level non-profit organization solely dedicated to advocating for LGBT parents and their families.
  • Families Like Ours - Adoption resource center with a focus on same-sex parenting.
  • The Rockway Institute for LGBT research in the public interest at Alliant International University
  • COLAGE (Children of Lesbians and Gays Everywhere)
  • Canada.com "In the Family Way" - News story of gay and lesbian adoptive families, and the surrogate and donor family.
  • Families Like Mine

 
 

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