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Encyclopedia > Kuwait
دولة الكويت
Dawlat al-Kuwayt
State of Kuwait
Flag of Kuwait
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemAl-Nasheed Al-Watani
Capital Kuwait City
29°22′N 47°58′E / 29.367, 47.967
Official languages Arabic
Demonym Kuwaiti
Government Constitutional hereditary emirate[1]
 -  Emir Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah
 -  Prime Minister Nasser Al-Mohammed Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah
Independence
 -  from the UK June 19, 1961 
Area
 -  Total 17,818 km² (157th)
6,880 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  2007 estimate 3,399,637[2] (n/a)
 -  Density 131/km² (68th)
339/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2007 estimate
 -  Total US$130.1 billion (CIA) (56th)
 -  Per capita US$39,300 (CIA) (4th)
HDI (2007) 0.891 (high) (33rd)
Currency Kuwaiti dinar (KWD)
Time zone AST (UTC+3)
 -  Summer (DST) (not observed) (UTC+3)
Internet TLD .kw
Calling code +965

The State of Kuwait (Arabic: دولة الكويت‎) is a sovereign emirate on the coast of the Persian Gulf, enclosed by Saudi Arabia to the south and Iraq to the north and west. The name is a diminutive of an Arabic word meaning "fortress built near water."[4] It has a population of 3.1 million and an area of 17,818 km². Kuwait is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of government and Kuwait City serves as its political and economic capital. Image File history File links Flag_of_Kuwait. ... Image File history File links Kuwait_coa. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of Kuwait (Arabic: ) was adopted on September 7, 1961 and officially hoisted November 24, 1961. ... The Coat of arms of Kuwait was adopted in 1962 and it consists of the shield of the flag design in color superimposed on a falcon with wings displayed. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Al-Nasheed Al-Watani (Arabic: النشيد الوطني, meaning National Anthem). The Kuwaiti national anthem is by poet Ahmad Meshari Al-Adwani, Ibrahim Al-Soula composed the music and Ahmad Ali arranged the composition. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Kuwait City Kuwait City (also Al-Kuwait - الكويت), population 32,403 (2005 Census), is the capital of the emirate of Kuwait and part of the Al-Asimah governorate. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Arabic redirects here. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... For the entry on the naval ship U.S.S. Constitution, see: USS Constitution. ... For the scientific journal Heredity see Heredity (journal) Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characters from parent to offspring, either through their genes or through the social institution called inheritance (for example, a title of nobility is passed from individual to individual according to relevant customs and... Etymologically an emirate or amirate (Arabic: إمارة Imarah, plural: إمارات Imarat) is the quality, dignity, office or territorial competence of any Emir (prince, governor etc. ... This is an (incomplete) list of emirs of Kuwait: The Sabah dynasty came to power in 1752, before which date the Bani Khalid tribe ruled the region. ... His Highness Sheikh Sabah IV Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah (Arabic: صباح الأحمد الجابر الصباح Sabāh al-Ahmad al-Jābir as-Sabāh; born June 6, 1929) is the Emir of Kuwait. ... Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah: (13 Jul 2003 - present) ... Sheikh Nasser Al-Mohammed Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah is the Prime minister of the state of Kuwait. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... ISO 4217 Code KWD User(s) Kuwait Inflation 3. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .kw is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for Kuwait. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Etymologically an emirate or amirate (Arabic: إمارة Imarah, plural: إمارات Imarat) is the quality, dignity, office or territorial competence of any Emir (prince, governor etc. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... Kuwait City Kuwait City (also Al-Kuwait - الكويت), population 32,403 (2005 Census), is the capital of the emirate of Kuwait and part of the Al-Asimah governorate. ...


Kuwait has the world's fifth largest proven oil reserves[5] and is the fourth richest country in the world per capita.[6] Kuwait's oil fields were discovered and exploited in the 1930s and after it gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1961, the nation's oil industry saw unprecedented growth. Petroleum and petroleum products now account for nearly 95% of export revenues, and 80% of government income.[7] This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... Petro redirects here. ...


In 1990, Kuwait was invaded and annexed by neighboring Iraq. The seven month-long Iraqi occupation came to an end after a direct military intervention by United States-led forces. Nearly 700 Kuwaiti oil wells were set ablaze by the retreating Iraqi army resulting in a major environmental and economic catastrophe.[8] Kuwait's infrastructure was badly damaged during the war and had to be rebuilt.[9] Combatants Republic of Iraq State of Kuwait Commanders Ali Hassan al-Majid N/A Strength 100,000[1] 16,000[2] Casualties 37+ aircraft (est. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Kuwaiti oil wells on fire. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Kuwait

The history of Kuwait goes between India and Europe. By late 18th-century, most of the local people made a living selling pearls. Because of internal conflicts and rivalry with the Wahhabis of the Arabian Peninsula, Benu Khaled's influence over Kuwait gradually waned and the Utub gained greater independence. In 1756, the Utub elected Sabah I bin Jaber as the first emir of Kuwait. [10] The current ruling family of Kuwait, al-Sabah, are descendants of Sabah I. History of Kuwait. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pearl (disambiguation). ... Wahhabism (Arabic: Al-Wahhābīyya الوهابية) or Wahabism is a conservative 18th century reform movement of Sunni Islam founded by Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab, after whom the movement is named. ... Sheikh Abu Abd Allah Sabah I bin Jaber Al Sabah (Sabah I; c. ... This is an (incomplete) list of emirs of Kuwait: The Sabah dynasty came to power in 1752, before the Bani Khalid tribe was ruling the region. ... The House of Al-Sabāh (Arabic: الصباح) are the Royal Family of Kuwait. ...


As the influence of the Ottoman Empire increased in the region, Kuwait was assigned the status of a caza of the Ottomans. After the signing of the Anglo-Ottoman Convention of 1913, then emir of Kuwait, Mubarak Al-Sabah, was diplomatically recognized by both the Ottomans and British as the ruler of the autonomous caza of the city of Kuwait and the hinterlands.[11] The 1922 Treaty of Uqair set Kuwait's border with Saudi Arabia and also established the Saudi-Kuwaiti neutral zone, an area of about 5,180 km² adjoining Kuwait's southern border. Oil was first discovered in Kuwait in the 1930s and the government became more proactive in establishing internationally recognized boundaries. After World War I, the Ottoman Empire was financially crippled and the invading British forces invalidated the Anglo-Ottoman Convention, declaring Kuwait to be an "independent sheikdom under British protectorate". Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... KAZA (Channel 54) is a Azteca America television station affiliate in the Los Angeles area. ... The Anglo-Ottoman Convention of 1913 was a short-lived agreement signed in July 1913 between the Ottoman sultan Mehmed VI and the British over several issues. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Uqair Protocol was issued on December 2, 1922, in response to the Wahhabi Bedouin raiders, operating from Nejd, under Abdul Aziz ibn Abdul Rahman ibn Saud. ... The Saudi-Kuwaiti neutral zone, also known as the Divided Zone, is an area of 5,770 km² between the borders of Saudi Arabia and Kuwait that was left undefined when the border was established by the Uqair Convention of December 2, 1922. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


On June 19, 1961, Kuwait became fully independent following an exchange of notes between the United Kingdom and the then emir of Kuwait, Abdullah Al-Salim Al-Sabah.[12] The Gulf rupee, issued by the Reserve Bank of India, was replaced by the Kuwaiti dinar. The discovery of large oil fields, such as the Burgan field, triggered a large influx of foreign investments into Kuwait. The massive growth of the petroleum industry transformed Kuwait into one of the richest countries in the Arabian Peninsula and by 1952, the country became the largest exporter of oil in the Persian Gulf. This massive growth attracted several foreign workers, especially from Egypt and India. Kuwait settled its boundary disputes with Saudi Arabia and agreed on sharing equally the neutral zone's petroleum reserves, onshore and offshore. After a brief stand-off over boundary issues, Iraq formally recognized Kuwait's independence and its borders in October 1963. During the 1970s, the Kuwaiti government nationalized the Kuwait Oil Company, ending its partnership with Gulf Oil and British Petroleum. In 1982, Kuwait experienced a major economic crisis after the Souk Al-Manakh stock market crash and decrease in oil price.[13] However, the crisis was short-lived as Kuwait's oil production increased steadily to fill the gap caused by decrease in Iraq's and Iran's oil production levels following the events of the Iran-Iraq War. Abdullah III Al-Salim Al-Sabah (Arabic: عبد الله الثالث السالم الصباح) lived from 1895 to November 24, 1965. ... The Gulf Rupee, also known as the Persian Gulf Rupee (XPGR), was introduced by the Indian government as a replacement for the Indian Rupee for circulation exclusively outside the country with the Reserve Bank of India [Amendment] Act, 1 May 1959. ... The RBI headquarters in Mumbai The RBI Regional Office in Mumbai The RBI heaquarters in Delhi. ... ISO 4217 Code KWD User(s) Kuwait Inflation 3. ... Drilling rig in a small oil field Near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 An oil field is an area with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (oil) from below ground. ... The onshore Burgan Field in the desert of southeastern Kuwait is one of the worlds largest and richest oil fields. ... Arabia redirects here. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... The Kuwait Oil Company is one of the biggest oil companies in the world. ... Gulf Oil was a major global oil company from the 1900s to the 1980s. ... This article is about the corporation known as BP. See also BP (disambiguation) BP (formerly British Petroleum and briefly known as BP Amoco) (NYSE: BP) is a petroleum company headquartered in London, United Kingdom. ... The Souk Al-Manakh stock market crash was a 1982 stock market crash in Kuwait. ... Belligerents Iran Patriotic Union of Kurdistan Iraq Peoples Mujahedin of Iran Soldiers and volunteers from different Arab countries. ...

USAF aircraft (F-16, F-15C and F-15E) fly over Kuwaiti oil fires, set by the retreating Iraqi army during Operation Desert Storm in 1991.
USAF aircraft (F-16, F-15C and F-15E) fly over Kuwaiti oil fires, set by the retreating Iraqi army during Operation Desert Storm in 1991.

Kuwait had heavily funded Iraq's eight year-long war with Iran. By the time the war ended, Kuwait decided not to forgive Iraq's US$ 65 billion debt.[14] An economic warfare between the two countries followed after Kuwait increased its oil production by 40 percent.[15] Tensions between the two countries increased after Iraq alleged that Kuwait was slant drilling oil from its share of the Rumaila field.[16]. On 2 August, 1990 Iraqi forces invaded and annexed Kuwait. Saddam Hussein, then President of Iraq, deposed the emir of Kuwait, Jaber Al-Sabah, and installed Ali Hassan al-Majid as the new governor of Kuwait.[17] After a series of failed diplomatic negotiations, the United States-led coalition of thirty-four nations fought the Persian Gulf War to remove the Iraqi forces from Kuwait. The coalition successfully liberated Kuwait from Iraqi occupation on February 26, 1991.[18] Kuwait paid the coalition forces US$17 billion for their war efforts.[19] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1274 pixel, file size: 480 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Edit for WP:FPC original image was here USAF aircraft of the 335th Fighter Squadron (F-16, F-15C and F-15E) fly over Kuwaiti oil... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1274 pixel, file size: 480 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Edit for WP:FPC original image was here USAF aircraft of the 335th Fighter Squadron (F-16, F-15C and F-15E) fly over Kuwaiti oil... Seal of the Air Force. ... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ... An F-15 executing a zoom-climb takeoff in afterburner The Boeing (formerly McDonnell Douglas) F-15 Eagle is an American-built, all-weather, extremely maneuverable, tactical fighter designed to gain and maintain air superiority in aerial combat. ... See F-15 Eagle for main F-15 page. ... Kuwaiti oil wells on fire. ... Combatants U.S.-led coalition Iraq Commanders George H. W. Bush, Norman Schwarzkopf, Colin Powell Saddam Hussein, Ali Hassan Al-Majid, Hussein Kamel Strength 660,000 ~545,000 Casualties 345 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 - 100,000 dead, 100,000 - 300,000 wounded The 1991 Gulf War (also Persian... Belligerents Iran Patriotic Union of Kurdistan Iraq Peoples Mujahedin of Iran Soldiers and volunteers from different Arab countries. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Directional drilling. ... The Rumaila Field is an oil field in southern Iraq that also spills over into Kuwait, possession of this field led to disputes between Iraq and Kuwait and was one of reasons for Iraqs invasion of Kuwait in 1990. ... Combatants Republic of Iraq State of Kuwait Commanders Ali Hassan al-Majid N/A Strength 100,000[1] 16,000[2] Casualties 37+ aircraft (est. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Jaber III al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah, GCB, GCMG (Arabic: صاحب السمو الأمير الشيخ جابر الأحمد الجابر الصباح)‎ (June 29, 1926–January 15, 2006), of the al-Sabah dynasty, served as the thirteenth Emir of Kuwait, and third Emir since Kuwaits independence from Britain, from December 31, 1977, until his death. ... Ali Hassan al-Majid at an investigative hearing in 2004 Ali Hassan Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: ‎ transliteration: , born 1941) is a former Baathist Iraqi Defense Minister and military commander. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


During their retreat, the Iraqi armed forces carried out a scorched earth policy by damaging 700 oil wells in Kuwait, of which approximately 600 were set on fire.[20] It was estimated that by the time Kuwait was liberated from Iraqi occupation, about 5 to 6 million barrels (950,000 m³) of oil was being burned in a single day because of these fires.[21] Oil and soot accumulation had affected the entire Persian Gulf region and large oil lakes were created holding approximately 25 to 50 million barrels (7,900,000 m³) of oil[22] and covering 5% of Kuwait's land area.[23] In total, about 11 million barrels (1,700,000 m³) of oil was released into the Persian Gulf[24] and an additional 2% of Kuwait's 96 billion barrels (15,300,000,000 m³) of crude oil reserves were burned by the time the oil fires were brought under control.[25] The fires took more than nine months to extinguish fully and it took Kuwait more than 2 years and US$50 billion in infrastructure reconstruction to reach pre-invasion oil output.[26] Kuwait has since largely recovered from the socio-economic, environmental, and public health effects of the Gulf war. For the computer game, see Scorched Earth (computer game). ... An oil well is a laymans term for any perforation through the Earths surface designed to find and release both petroleum oil and gas hydrocarbons. ... Kuwaiti oil wells on fire. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Kuwait
Majlis Al-Umma (مجلس الأمة, "The Council of the Nation"), the Kuwaiti parliament, in Kuwait City.
Majlis Al-Umma (مجلس الأمة, "The Council of the Nation"), the Kuwaiti parliament, in Kuwait City.

Kuwait is a constitutional monarchy and has the oldest directly elected parliament of the Persian Gulf Arab countries. The head of state is the Emir or Sheikh, a hereditary office. The Emir appoints the prime minister, who until recently was also the crown prince. A council of ministers aids the prime minister in his task as head of government which must contain at least one elected member of the parliament. The number of ministers must not exceed one-third of the elected members of the parliament. Politics of Kuwait takes place in a framework of a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, whereby the Emir is the head of government. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1704, 880 KB) Summary Majlis al-Umma (Parliament) in Kuwait City, picture taken by User:Leshonai on 2005-04-27 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1704, 880 KB) Summary Majlis al-Umma (Parliament) in Kuwait City, picture taken by User:Leshonai on 2005-04-27 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... The National Assembly of Kuwait, known as the Majlis Al-Umma, is the parliament of Kuwait. ... This article is about the legislative institution. ... Entrance to the emirs palace in Bukhara. ...


The parliament has the power to dismiss the prime minister or anyone of his cabinet through a series of constitutional procedures. According to the constitution, nomination of a new crown prince or head of state (Emir) by the ruling family has to be confirmed by the National Assembly. If he does not win the votes of the majority of the assembly, the Emir (or the royal family members) must submit the names of three candidates to the National Assembly, and the Assembly must select one of these to be the new crown prince. The parliament known as the Majlis Al-Umma (National Assembly), consists of fifty elected members, who are chosen in elections held every four years. Government ministers, according to the Constitution of the State, are given membership in the parliament, and can number up to sixteen excluded from the fifty elected members. The National Assembly of Kuwait, known as the Majlis Al-Umma, is the parliament of Kuwait. ...


Two-thirds of Kuwait's population do not have citizenship and thus may not vote in elections. Additionally, prior to 2005, only 15% of the Kuwaiti citizen population was allowed to vote, with all women, "recently naturalized" citizens (i.e. those of less than thirty years' citizenship), and members of the armed forces excluded. On May 16, 2005, Parliament permitted women's suffrage by a 35-23 vote, subject to official interpretation of Islamic law and effective for the 2006 Parliamentary Election. The decision could raise Kuwait's voter rolls from 139,000 to as many as 339,000 if all eligible women register; the total number of Kuwaitis is estimated at more than 960,000. Recently, the former Prime Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah announced the appointment of Dr Massouma Mubarak as planning minister and minister of state for administrative development affairs. The appointment of a woman as a cabinet minister was a major breakthrough in Kuwaiti political system and it makes Kuwait the third country in the conservative Persian Gulf Arab monarchies to have a woman cabinet minister. The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ...


The government passed laws in the years 2005-2006 that restrict the freedom of speech. Laws such as the new media law has become a huge obstacle for writers and citizens who might consider criticizing the government's performance. Lately many journalists were indicted for stating their opinions regarding the government or specific ministries' performance; this includes a court order to shut down a leading Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Watan for three days and a magazine editor being sent to jail for criticizing the government action towards a specific incident. Al-watan (country or nation) is commonly used as the name of Arabic newspapers: Al-Watan (Bahrain) Al-Watan (Jordan) Al-Watan (Kuwait) Al-Watan (Oman) Al-Watan (Qatar) Al-Watan (Saudi Arabia) Al Watan Arab American National Newspaper Categories: | ...

See also: Al-Sabah and Elections in Kuwait

The Al-Sabah (Arabic: الصباح) are the ruling Family of Kuwait. ... Elections in Kuwait are held for both the National Assembly (Majlis al-Umma) and for the Municipality. ...

Geography

Main article: Geography of Kuwait
Sandstorm over Kuwait in April, 2003
Sandstorm over Kuwait in April, 2003

Located in the north-west corner of the Arabian Peninsula, Kuwait is one of the smallest countries in the world in terms of land area. The flat, sandy Arabian Desert covers most of Kuwait. Kuwait is the only country in the world which has no natural lake or water reservoir.[27] There is little difference in the country's altitude with the highest point in the country being 306 m above sea-level.[7] It has nine islands, all of which with the exception of Failaka Island are uninhabited.[28] With an area of 860 km², the Bubiyan is the largest island in Kuwait and is connected to the rest of the country by a 2,380 m long bridge.[29] Sparse vegetation is found along its 499 km long coastline.[7] Kuwait City is located on Kuwait Bay, a natural deep-water harbor. This article describes the geography of Kuwait. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 771 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3600 × 2800 pixel, file size: 816 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Dust storm over Kuwait and Southern Iraq On April 16, 2003, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite captured this image of a... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 771 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3600 × 2800 pixel, file size: 816 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Dust storm over Kuwait and Southern Iraq On April 16, 2003, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite captured this image of a... Look up sandstorm in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Kuwait has nine islands (ten including one former island). ... Failaka Island (Arabic: ‎)is an island in Kuwait, 20 km off the coast of Kuwait City. ... Bubiyan Island is the largest island in the Kuwaiti coastal island chain. ...


The land area is considered arable.[7] Kuwait has some of the world's richest oil fields with the Burgan field having a total capacity of approximately 70 billion barrels (11,000,000,000 m³) of proven oil reserves. During the 1991 Kuwait oil fires, more than 500 oil lakes were created covering a combined surface area of about 35.7 km².[30] The resulting soil contamination due to oil and soot accumulation had made eastern and south-eastern parts of Kuwait uninhabitable. Sand and oil residue had reduced large parts of the Kuwaiti desert to semi-asphalt surfaces.[31] The oil spills during the Gulf war also had drastically affected Kuwait's marine resources.[32] Drilling rig in a small oil field Near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 An oil field is an area with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (oil) from below ground. ... The onshore Burgan Field in the desert of southeastern Kuwait is one of the worlds largest and richest oil fields. ...


Kuwait has a warm tropical climate. Summer, which last from April to September, is extremely hot and dry with temperatures easily crossing 45 °C (113 °F) during daytime.[33] Winter season, from November through February, is cool with some precipitation and average temperatures around 13 °C (56 °F) with extremes from -2 °C to 27 °C. Annual rainfall averages less than 127 mm and occurs chiefly between October and April.[34] The spring season in March is warm and pleasant with occasional thunderstorms. The frequent winds from the northwest are cool in winter and spring and hot in summer. Southeasterly winds, usually hot and damp, spring up between July and October; hot and dry south winds prevail in spring and early summer. The shamal, a northwesterly wind common during June and July, causes dramatic sandstorms.[35]


Governorates

Map of Kuwait

Kuwait is divided into six governorates (muhafazat, sing. muhafadhah): map of Kuwait (CIA) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... map of Kuwait (CIA) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The five governorates (muhafazat) of Kuwait are Al Ahmadi Al Farwaniyah Al Asimah Al Jahra Hawalli Categories: Lists of subnational entities | Kuwait | Governorates of Kuwait | Governorates ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with muhafazah. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Governorate. ...

The governorates are subdivided into districts. The Al Ahmadi Governorate (Arabic:الاحمدي) is one of the six governorates of Kuwait. ... Al Farwaniyah (Arabic: الفروانية) is one of 6 governorates of Kuwait. ... The Al Asimah (Arabic: ألعاصمه ) governate of Kuwait consists of Kuwait City and the sourounding suburbs of Shuwaik, Shamiya, Dahiya Abduallah al Salem, Dasmam, Bnied Al-Gar, Nuzha, Fayha, Adiliya, Khaldiya, Yarmouk, Qurtoba (Qortuba), and Kaifan. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Hawalli (Arabic: حولي) is one of the six governorates of Kuwait, consisting of six districts: Salmiya Hawalli Jabriya Bayan Salwa Mishref A 2005 estimate reports the population of Hawalli to be 393,861 (source: [1]). Abdallah Abdalrahman Alruwaished Dr. Kazem Abal Nasser Abdulazim Marafi Categories: | | ... Mubarak Al-Kabeer (Arabic: مبارك الكبير) is one of the governorates of Kuwait which mainly houses residential areas. ...


The major cities are the capital Kuwait City and Jahrah (a thirty-minute drive northwest of Kuwait City). The main residential and business areas are Salmiya and Hawalli. The main industrial area is Shuwaikh within the Al Asimah Governorate. The main palace is the As-Seef Palace in the old part of Kuwait City where the Emir runs the daily matters of the country whilst the government headquarters are in the Bayan Palace and the Emir lives in Dar Salwa. Kuwait City Kuwait City (also Al-Kuwait - الكويت), population 32,403 (2005 Census), is the capital of the emirate of Kuwait and part of the Al-Asimah governorate. ... City/town located to the north-west of Kuwait City in Kuwait which mainly houses agricultural areas. ... Salmiya, located 12 kilometers south east of Kuwait City, is one of the largest towns in Kuwait with a population of 150,000. ... Hawalli (Arabic: حولي) is one of the six governorates of Kuwait, consisting of six districts: Salmiya Hawalli Jabriya Bayan Salwa Mishref A 2005 estimate reports the population of Hawalli to be 393,861 (source: [1]). Abdallah Abdalrahman Alruwaished Dr. Kazem Abal Nasser Abdulazim Marafi Categories: | | ... Shuwaikh is an industrial area within the Al-Asimah governorate in the country of Kuwait. ... The Al Asimah (Arabic: ألعاصمه ) governate of Kuwait consists of Kuwait City and the sourounding suburbs of Shuwaik, Shamiya, Dahiya Abduallah al Salem, Dasmam, Bnied Al-Gar, Nuzha, Fayha, Adiliya, Khaldiya, Yarmouk, Qurtoba (Qortuba), and Kaifan. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Kuwait
An oil refinery in Mina-Al-Ahmadi, Kuwait.
An oil refinery in Mina-Al-Ahmadi, Kuwait.

Kuwait is a highly industrialized country with a GDP (PPP) of US$138.6 billion[36] and a per capita income of US$39,300[36], making it the fourth richest country in the world.[6] Kuwait's human development index (HDI) stands at 0.871, the second highest in Middle East, after Israel and the highest in the Arab world. With a GDP growth rate of 5.7%, Kuwait has one of the fastest growing economies in the region.[36] According to the 2008 Index of Economic Freedom, Kuwait has the second-most free economy in the Middle East.[37] In March 2007, Kuwait's foreign exchange reserves stood at US$213 billion.[38] The Kuwait Stock Exchange, which has about 200 firms listed, is the second-largest stock exchange in the Arab world with a total market capitalization of US$235 billion.[39] In 2007, the Kuwaiti government posted a budget surplus of US$43 billion.[40] Kuwait is a small, relatively open economy with proved crude oil reserves of about 94 billion barrels (15 km³), i. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2004). ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... Arab States redirects here. ... Map of Economic Freedom released by the Heritage Foundation. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Kuwait Stock Exchange (KSE) is the national stock market of Kuwait. ...


Kuwait has a proven crude oil reserves of 104 billion barrels (15 km³)[36], estimated to be 10% of the world's reserves. Being a tax-free country, Kuwait's oil industry accounts for 80% of government revenue. Petroleum and petrochemicals accounts for nearly half of GDP and 95% of export revenues. Increases in oil price since 2003 has caused a surge in Kuwait's economy.[41] Kuwait's current oil production of 2.8 million bpd is expected to increase to 4 million bpd by 2020.[42] To realize this production target, Kuwait Petroleum Corporation plans to spend US$51 billion between 2007 to 2012 to upgrade and expand the country's existing refineries.[43] Other major industries include shipping, construction, cement, water desalination, construction materials and financial services.[36] Kuwait's climate limits agricultural development. Consequently, with the exception of fish, it depends almost wholly on food imports. About 75% of potable water must be distilled or imported. The government is keen on decreasing Kuwait's dependence on oil to fuel its economy by transforming it into a regional trading and tourism hub. The planned US$77 billion City of Silk is the largest real estate development project in the Middle East.[44] The Central Bank of Kuwait issues Kuwait’s currency, the Kuwaiti dinar. In December 2007, the dinar was the highest valued currency unit in the world.[45] Taxes redirects here. ... Petro redirects here. ... A petrochemical is any chemical derived from fossil fuel. ... Kuwait Petroleum Corporation(KPC), is an umbrella company in Kuwait founded on Janurary 27, 1980 which takes control of all petroleum and oil-related aspects of Kuwait. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... For other uses, see Construction (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... Shevchenko BN350 desalination unit situated on the shore of the Caspian Sea. ... The field of finance refers to the concepts of time, money and risk and how they are interelated. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Laboratory distillation set-up: 1: Heat source 2: Still pot 3: Still head 4: Thermometer/Boiling point temperature 5: Condenser 6: Cooling water in 7: Cooling water out 8: Distillate/receiving flask 9: Vacuum/gas inlet 10: Still receiver 11: Heat control 12: Stirrer speed control 13: Stirrer/heat plate... Madinat al-Hareer (Arabic: مدينة الحرير, meaning City of Silk), is a proposed 250 square kilometer planned urban area in Subiya, Kuwait, an area just opposite Kuwait City which, upon construction, would include the Burj Mubarak al-Kabir , the worlds tallest structure, a natural desert reservation of 2 square kilometres, a... The Central Bank of Kuwait was established in 1969 to offer a flexable currency system on behalf of the State of Kuwait. ... ISO 4217 Code KWD User(s) Kuwait Inflation 3. ... The highest valued currency unit is the currency in which a single unit buys the highest number of any given other currency or the largest amount of a given good. ...


In 2007, estimated exports stood at US$59.97 billion and imports were around US$17.74 billion. Petroleum, petrochemical products, fertilizers and financial services are major export commodities. Kuwait imports a wide range of products ranging from food products and textiles to machinery. Kuwait's most important trading partners are Japan, South Korea, United States, China, European Union, Saudi Arabia and India.[36] Petro redirects here. ... Petrochemicals are chemical products made from raw materials of petroleum (hydrocarbon) origin. ... Fertilizers are chemicals given to plants with the intention of promoting growth; they are usually applied either via the soil or by foliar spraying. ...


Demographics

Kuwait has one of the most cosmopolitan societies in the Middle East.

As of 2007, Kuwait's population is estimated to be 3 to 3.5 million people which included approximately 2 million non-nationals.[46] Kuwaiti citizens are therefore a minority of those who reside in Kuwait. The government only rarely grants citizenship to non-citizens. About 96% of Kuwaits population is urban. ...


About 57% of Kuwaiti population is Arab, 39% Asian (including people from South Asia), and 4% are classified Bidoon.[47] Bidoons are a group of stateless Arab residents of Kuwait. Other large groups of expatriates include Assyrians, Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis and Filipinos. In 2003, more than 400,000 Indian nationals lived in Kuwait,[48] making them the largest expatriate community there.[49] After Kuwait was liberated from Iraqi occupation, most of the 400,000 Palestinians living in Kuwait were expelled because of their government's open support for the Iraqi forces. Only a few thousand Palestinians remain in Kuwait.[50] The population of ethnic Armenians in Kuwait also shrank drastically following the events of the Iraq-Kuwait war.[51] For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... Language(s) Aramaic Religion(s) Syriac Christianity Related ethnic groups Other Semitic peoples, and other ethnic groups from the Fertile Crescent. ... A non-resident Indian (NRI) is an Indian citizen who has migrated to another country. ... For the band, see Expatriate (band). ... At the end of the Gulf War Kuwait expelled some 400,000 Palestinians because the Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat had aligned the PLO with Saddam Hussein, who had invaded Kuwait. ... The Armenians in Kuwait are Kuwaiti citizens of Armenian descent. ...


80% of Kuwait's population practices Islam.[52] Despite Islam being a state religion,[53] Kuwait has large communities of Christians (est. 300,000 to 400,000), Hindus (est. 300,000), Buddhists (est. 100,000), and Sikhs (est. 10,000).[54] Of the Muslims in Kuwait, 70% are Sunni and 30% are Shia Muslims.[7] Kuwait's official language is Arabic, though English is widely spoken. Other important languages include Persian, Hindi, Urdu, Filipino, and Bengali. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... South America Europe Middle East Africa Asia Oceania Demography of religions by country Full list of articles on religion by country Religion Portal         Nations with state religions:  Buddhism  Islam  Shia Islam  Sunni Islam  Orthodox Christianity  Protestantism  Roman Catholic Church A state religion (also called an official religion, established church... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Buddhism, a Dharmic faith, is usually considered one of the worlds major religions, with between 230 to 500 million followers. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Shia may refer to a denomination of Islam, or related items, such as: Shia Islam, the second largest denomination of Islam, after Sunni Islam. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Farsi redirects here. ... -1... Urdu ( , , trans. ... Bangla redirects here. ...


Infrastructure

Water reservoirs in Kuwait.
Water reservoirs in Kuwait.

Kuwait's infrastructure was severely damaged during the First Gulf War. Fleeing Iraqi soldiers were also ordered to set hundreds of oil wells on fire and the country's oil production had come to a standstill. Much has changed since the end of the Gulf War. The Kuwaiti government has spent billions of dollars to construct an elaborate roadway system, and, the telecommunication industry achieved an incredible growth rate. Kuwait City boasts more than two dozen five-star hotels and resorts and several skyscrapers dominate the city's skyline. Kuwait Infrastructure Maintenance Management System overlooks the oil-rich country's infrastructure. Kuwait's energy sector is the main source for 47% of the country's annual income.[citation needed] For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Kuwait City Kuwait City (also Al-Kuwait - الكويت), population 32,403 (2005 Census), is the capital of the emirate of Kuwait and part of the Al-Asimah governorate. ...


Kuwait has several major infrastructure projects planned, including one of the biggest seafront projects in the world, Madinat al-Hareer.[citation needed] If completed, this project would include the world's tallest tower, and, numerous housing, health, education, environmental, business, and tourism centres. Other major projects are the development of a deep-water port on Bubiyan Island, which could become a gateway for trade into Iraq and western Iran.[citation needed] However, political tension between the National Assembly and the government has severely delayed and hampered the approval and development of most infrastructure projects. Madinat al-Hareer (Arabic: مدينة الحرير, meaning City of Silk), is a proposed 250 square kilometer planned urban area in Subiya, Kuwait, an area just opposite Kuwait City which, upon construction, would include the Burj Mubarak al-Kabir , the worlds tallest structure, a natural desert reservation of 2 square kilometres, a... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... Bubiyan Island is the largest island in the Kuwaiti coastal island chain. ...


Transportation

Shuwaikh Port is the largest commercial port in Kuwait.
Shuwaikh Port is the largest commercial port in Kuwait.

Kuwait has an extensive, modern and well-maintained network of highways. Roadways extended 5,749 km, of which 4,887 km is paved.[7] In 2000, there were some 552,400 passenger cars, and 167,800 commercial taxis, trucks, and buses in use. Since there is no railway system in the country, most of the people travel by automobiles.[55] The government plans to construct US$11 billion rail network which will include a city metro for its capital.[56] Bus services are provided by City Bus and state-owned Kuwait Public Transportation Corporation.[57] A highway is a major road within a city, or linking several cities together. ...


There are a total of seven airports in the country, of which four have paved runways. Kuwait International Airport serves as the principal hub for international air travel. State-owned Kuwait Airways is the largest airline in the country. In 2001, the airline carried 2,084,600 passengers on domestic and international flights.[58] In 2004, the first private airline of Kuwait, Jazeera Airways, was launched.[59] Kuwait International Airport is located in Al-Maqwa, Kuwait, near Kuwait City. ... Kuwait Airways (Arabic: الخطوط الجوية الكويتية) is the national airline of Kuwait, based in Kuwait City and wholly owned by the Kuwaiti Government. ... Jazeera Airways at Kuwait International Airport CEO Marwan Boodai & Airbus CEO Louis Gallois At The Paris Air Show 2007 Jazeera Airways is a low-fare airline based in Kuwait. ...


Kuwait has one of the largest shipping industry in the Persian Gulf region. The Kuwait Ports Public Authority manages and operates ports across Kuwait.[60] The country’s principal commercial seaports are Shuwaikh and Shuaiba which handled combined cargo of 753,334 TEU in 2006.[61] Mina Al-Ahmadi, the largest port in the country, handles most of Kuwait's oil exports.[62] Construction of another major port located in Bubiyan island started in 2005. The port is expected to handle 1.3 million TEU when operation starts in 2008.[63] Bubiyan Island is the largest island in the Kuwaiti coastal island chain with an area of 863 sq km. ...


Education

A kindergarten school in Kuwait.
A kindergarten school in Kuwait.

Oil revenues have allowed Kuwait to build an extensive educational system, yielding a literacy rate of 82.9 percent. There are a lot of private schools in Kuwait, including The English School,[64] which was the first private school to open in Kuwait. Other private schools include the Fahaheel Al-Watanieh Indian Private School (Delhi Public School), Jabriya Indian School, Indian Community School, Al-Bayan Bilingual School, Gulf Indian School, Carmel School (Kuwait),[65] The British School of Kuwait, Kuwait English School, The Gulf English School, The American School of Kuwait,[66] American International School, universal American school, and The New English School. All private schools offer different and competitive programs, and whilst each school strives to be the best at private education, different parents and expatriates prefer different private schools naturally. Public schooling is free and compulsory from the age of 5 to 18, and several private schools also teach this age group. Kuwait University is Kuwait's only public university. The medical school in particular, provides up-to-date training for students.[citation needed] Both the extensive library system at Kuwait University and the collection at Kuwait National Museum (1957) were heavily damaged and looted during the Iraqi occupation in the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Other universities in Kuwait include the American University of Kuwait, the Gulf University for Science and Technology, the Australian College of Kuwait, the Arab Open University (AOU) and the AUM. World literacy rates by country, based on The World Factbook. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Pre-dating the Iraq invasion of Kuwait, Jabriya Indian School was The New Indian School, registered in Hawally. ... Carmel school is an international convent institution started in 1964 by Roman Catholic nuns. ... -1... The Gulf English School is a British school in Kuwait, following the British National Curriculum. ... For the school of the same name in Amman, Jordan, see New English School (Jordan). ... Kuwait University (KU) was established in October 1966 , five years after Kuwaits independence from Britain, pursuant to an Amiri Decree, which postulated organization of higher education in Kuwait. ... The American University of Kuwait is an independent, private, equal opportunity, and co-educational liberal arts institution of higher education. ... Arab Open University (AOU, in Arabic الجامعة العربية المفتوحة) was founded in 2002 in Kuwait, Jordan, and Lebanon. ...


The Gulf University for Science and Technology was the first private university established in Kuwait in 2002. It currently has two campuses in Hawalli and a third campus in Mishref where the Australian College of Kuwait is also located. The American University of Kuwait opened in 2004 with Dr. Shafeeq Al-Ghabra as founding president. The Australian College of Kuwait also opened in 2004 and there are more universities and colleges being discussed. Box Hill College Kuwait, an Australian women's college, opened its doors in September 2007 in Abu Halifa. It is an accredited extended campus of Box Hill TAFE, Australia, and offers internationally recognized qualifications. Gulf University for Science and Technology (GUST) is the first private university established in Kuwait. ... The American University of Kuwait is an independent, private, equal opportunity, and co-educational liberal arts institution of higher education. ...


In September 2008, the American University of the Middle East will open in the suburb of Egaila. This will be followed by a satellite campus of Algonquin College in 2009. The main building of Algonquin College Algonquin College is an English-language, college of applied arts and technology in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ...


Culture

This does not cite any references or sources. ... Tabla player at the 8th International Music Festival in Kuwait Kuwaits musical traditions were well-recorded until the Gulf War, when Iraq invaded the country and destroyed the archive. ... West Asian cinema refers collectively to the film output and film industries of the West Asia. ...

Media

The 372 m tall Kuwait Telecommunications Tower is the main communication tower of Kuwait.
The 372 m tall Kuwait Telecommunications Tower is the main communication tower of Kuwait.

Kuwait has one of the most vocal and transparent media in the Arab World.[67] In 2007, Kuwait was ranked second in the Middle East after Israel in the freedom of press index.[68] Though the government funds several leading newspapers and satellite channels,[69] Kuwaiti journalists enjoy greater freedom than their regional counterparts.[70] State-owned Kuwait News Agency (KUNA) is the largest media house in the country. The Ministry of Information regulates all media and communication industry in Kuwait.[71] Image File history File links LiberationTower. ... Image File history File links LiberationTower. ... For other uses of Transparency, see Transparency (disambiguation). ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech often through a state constitution for its citizens, and associations of individuals extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ...


In 1998, there were 6 AM and 11 FM radio stations and 13 television stations. In 2000, there were 624 radios and 486 television sets for every 1,000 people. In 2001, there were 165,000 Internet subscribers served by three service providers.[72] Kuwait has ten satellite television channels of which four are controlled by the Ministry of Information. State-owned Kuwait Television (KTV) offered first colored broadcast in 1974 and operates three television channels.[72] Government-funded Radio Kuwait also offers daily informative programming in four foreign languages including Persian, Urdu, Tagalog and English on the AM and SW. Satellite television is television delivered by way of communications satellites, as compared to conventional terrestrial television and cable television. ...


In 1998, Kuwait had eight major daily newspapers in circulation of which two were in English and six were in Arabic. In 2002, the Arab Times was the most popular English daily followed by the Kuwait Times. Al-Anabaa, with a circulation of 106,800 copies, was the most widely read Arabic daily.[72] A press law forbids insulting references to God and Islamic prophet Muhammad. Another law which made leading newspaper publishers eligible for hefty fines for criticizing the ruling family was lifted in 1992. Leading newspapers continue to impose self-restraint while being critical of the emir.[73] However, no such restraint is observed while criticizing the government.[72] The Arab Times is an English language newspaper based in Kuwait. ... Kuwait Times, established in 1961 is the first English-language daily newspaper in the Arab Gulf. ... The Quran identifies a number of men as prophets of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ...


See also

Telephones - main lines in use: 412,000 (1997) Telephones - mobile cellular: 210,000 (1997) Mia Madison is very crazy she makes me sick and she is bout to be a monarchy her sister is dumb 2 and her brother is lovely and have a way with the woman:) kevin is... Following independence in June 1961, Kuwait faced its first major foreign policy problem arising from Iraqi claims to Kuwaits territory. ... This article describes the geography of Kuwait. ... Human rights in Kuwait are mixed. ... The Kuwait Boy Scouts Association (KBSA) is the national Scouting organization of Kuwait. ... The Kuwait Girl Guides Association (KGGA) is the national Guiding organization of Kuwait. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Kuwaiti Family Committee is an organization that was formed in 2004 by relatives of the Kuwaiti detainees in Guantanamo Bay. ... This is a list of Kuwaiti companies. ... Madinat al-Hareer (Arabic: مدينة الحرير, meaning City of Silk), is a proposed 250 square kilometer planned urban area in Subiya, Kuwait, an area just opposite Kuwait City which, upon construction, would include the Burj Mubarak al-Kabir , the worlds tallest structure, a natural desert reservation of 2 square kilometres, a... Before the Gulf War, Kuwait maintained a small military force consisting of army, navy, and air force and national guard units. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The postal history of Kuwait begins around 1775, when the East India Company began an overland desert camel service from the head of the Persian Gulf to Aleppo and Constantinople, as an alternative to slower sea travel around the Arabian Peninsula. ... Railways: 0 km Highways: total: 4,450 km paved: 3,590 km unpaved: 860 km (1999 est. ...

References

  1. ^ Nominal.
  2. ^ Kuwaiti Citizens approx. one million (1,054,598) and approx. two million (2,345,039) non-nationals (31/12/2007).
  3. ^ CIA - The World Factbook - Rank Order - GDP (purchasing power parity)
  4. ^ Kuwait (History) - the name is a diminutive of an Arabic word meaning fortress built near water
  5. ^ Oil & Gas Journal, January, 2007
  6. ^ a b CIA - The World Factbook - Rank Order - GDP - per capita (PPP)
  7. ^ a b c d e f CIA - The World Factbook - Kuwait
  8. ^ CNN.com - Kuwait still recovering from Gulf War fires - Jan. 3, 2003
  9. ^ BBC NEWS | World | Middle East | Country profiles | Country profile: Kuwait
  10. ^ Kuwait's History
  11. ^ Kuwait (06/07)
  12. ^ Kuwait (06/07)
  13. ^ Kuwait’s Souk al-Manakh Stock Bubble
  14. ^ Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait; 1990
  15. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=DejCbO1mvCYC&pg=PA156&dq=Kuwait+slant+drilling&sig=81dk_v5ZZ1F0oRhxuR6Fq7z61Qs
  16. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=DejCbO1mvCYC&pg=PA156&dq=Kuwait+slant+drilling&sig=81dk_v5ZZ1F0oRhxuR6Fq7z61Qs
  17. ^ CNS - The Significance of the "Death" of Ali Hassan al-Majid
  18. ^ Kuwait
  19. ^ Kuwait
  20. ^ http://earthshots.usgs.gov/Iraq/Iraqtext
  21. ^ Kuwait Ted Case
  22. ^ NASA - Top Story - 1991 KUWAIT OIL FIRES - March 21, 2003
  23. ^ http://earthshots.usgs.gov/Iraq/Iraqtext
  24. ^ CNN.com In-Depth Specials - Gulf War
  25. ^ Kuwait Oil Fires, Persian Gulf War - █ further reading:
  26. ^ http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?sf=2813&art_id=qw104820750289B262&click_id=2813&set_id=1
  27. ^ Kuwait - Quick facts, statistics and cultural notes
  28. ^ Bubiyan (island, Kuwait) - Britannica Online Encyclopedia
  29. ^ Structurae [en]: Bubiyan Bridge (1983)
  30. ^ Kuwaiti Oil Lakes - Sidebar - MSN Encarta
  31. ^ Kuwait Ted Case
  32. ^ Kuwait (country) - MSN Encarta
  33. ^ Kuwait (country) - MSN Encarta
  34. ^ Kuwait :: Climate - Britannica Online Encyclopedia
  35. ^ Kuwait :: Climate - Britannica Online Encyclopedia
  36. ^ a b c d e f CIA - The World Factbook - Kuwait
  37. ^ Index of Economic Freedom
  38. ^ AFP: Kuwait plans 77 billion dollar 'City of Silk'
  39. ^ AFP: Kuwaiti stocks end week on record high
  40. ^ AFP: Kuwait posts record 72 billion dollar income
  41. ^ Sparking the recovery: high oil prices are generating wealth for Kuwait and facilitating a massive construction programme. How is the country's electricity infrastructure placed to cope with the new demands that will be made upon it? - Journal, Magazine, Article, Periodical
  42. ^ UPDATE 2-Kuwait keeps 2020 oil capacity aim despite problems | Reuters
  43. ^ AFP: Kuwait to spend $51 bln on oil development
  44. ^ AFP: Kuwait plans 77 billion dollar 'City of Silk'
  45. ^ Floating exchange rate data taken from www.xe.com on December 22, 2007.
  46. ^ Arab Times Online. Kuwait population hits 2.992 m; Citizens up in number, down in percentage. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  47. ^ Kuwait (06/07)
  48. ^ The Hindu: Business Line. Special flight from Kuwait lands in Kochi. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  49. ^ Kuwait Information Office, New Delhi, India. Kuwait Embassy Office, New Delhi, India, Services. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  50. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Abbas apology to Kuwait over Iraq
  51. ^ Armenian General Benevolent Union. The Armenians of Kuwait: Rebuilding after the Gulf War. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  52. ^ Kuwait (06/07)
  53. ^ http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2005/51603.htm
  54. ^ U.S. Department of State. Kuwait: International Religious Freedom Report 2006. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  55. ^ Kuwait - Transportation
  56. ^ Kuwait eyes $11 bln rail network, city metro | Deals | IPOs | Reuters
  57. ^ Kuwait Transportation - Travel Guide - VirtualTourist.com
  58. ^ Kuwait - Transportation
  59. ^ The Seattle Times: Business & Technology: First flight for Kuwait's Jazeera Airways
  60. ^ http://www.arab.net/kuwait/kt_kppa.htm
  61. ^ Kuwait's ports continue to break records - Transportation - ArabianBusiness.com
  62. ^ Mina Al Ahmadi, Kuwait
  63. ^ Emerging Markets Economic Briefings
  64. ^ The English School, Kuwait. Welcome. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  65. ^ Carmel School. Carmel School, Kuwait; Profile. Retrieved on 2008-01-06.
  66. ^ ,American School of Kuwait. Welcome. Retrieved on 2007-12-26.
  67. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Country profiles | Country profile: Kuwait
  68. ^ Reporters sans frontières - Annual Worldwide Press Freedom Index - 2007
  69. ^ Kuwait Media overview
  70. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Country profiles | Country profile: Kuwait
  71. ^ Kuwait Media, Ministry of Information, Muhammad Abbas Abulhassan
  72. ^ a b c d Kuwait - Media
  73. ^ About Kuwait- Media

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External links

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  • Kuwait Yellow Pages Guide
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  • Wikimedia Atlas of Kuwait
  • Kuwait travel guide from Wikitravel
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Kuwait | AME Info Country Guide (452 words)
The Emirate of Kuwait is situated a the head of the Persian Gulf, and is bordered to the South by the Al Hasa desert region of Saudi Arabia, and Iraq which has a narrow exit to the port of Umm Qasr before the territory of Iran.
Most of the population lives in Kuwait City, the capital and administrative centre whose water towers are a famous international landmark.
The development of oil and gas infrastructure in Kuwait is extensive but has been sensitive to the environment.
Kuwait Government, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sheikh Muhammad Sabah Al-Salem Al-Sabah (458 words)
Kuwait's foreign policy is also concerned with the maintenance of its own independence, sovereignty and freedom of political decision.
Kuwait is also a member of the Arab League, where it realises its belief in a common Arab destiny by enhancing its relations with the Arab States.
Kuwait actively supports, and works for the advancement of the cardinal principles of the Arab League and all its associated organisations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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