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Encyclopedia > Kurt Vonnegut, Jr
Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (born November 11, 1922) is an American novelist, satirist, and most recently, graphic artist. Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... DeFoes Robinson Crusoe, Newspaper edition published in 1719 A novel (from French nouvelle, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which exposes the follies of its subject (for example, individuals, organizations, or states) to ridicule, often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... Graphic design is the applied art of arranging image and text to communicate a message. ...

Contents


Biography

Kurt Vonnegut was born to fourth-generation German-American parents in Indianapolis, the setting for many of his novels. He attended Cornell University from 1941 to 1943, where he served as an opinions section editor for the student newspaper, the Cornell Daily Sun. Vonnegut trained as a chemist and worked as a journalist before joining the U.S. Army and serving in World War II. He is a combat infantry veteran and holds a Purple Heart. His experiences as an advance scout with the U.S. 106th Infantry Division during the Battle of the Bulge, and in particular his witnessing of the bombing of Dresden, Germany, while a prisoner of war, would inform much of his work. This event would also form the core of his most famous work, Slaughterhouse-Five. The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... For other uses of the name Cornell, see Cornell (disambiguation). ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ... The Cornell Daily Sun, of Cornell University, is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the... The Purple Heart is a U.S. military decoration awarded in the name of the President of the United States to those who have been wounded or killed while serving in, or with, the U.S. military after April 5, 1917. ... The 106th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. World War II Activated: 15 March 1943. ... The Ardennes Offensive, also known as Second Battle of the Ardennes and popularly known as the Battle of the Bulge, started in late December 1944 and was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during World War II. The German army had intended to split the Allied line... The bombing of Dresden by the British Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) between February 13 and February 15, 1945 remains one of the most controversial events of World War II, even after 60 years. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


After the war, he attended the University of Chicago as a graduate student in anthropology and also worked as a police reporter at the City News Bureau of Chicago. He left Chicago to work in Schenectady, New York, in public relations for General Electric. He attributed his unadorned writing style to his reporting work. The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Anthropology (from the Greek word άνθρωπος, human) consists of the study of humankind (see genus Homo). ... City News Bureau of Chicago, or City Press, was one of the first cooperative news agencies in the United States. ... Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States and the largest inland city in the country. ... Schenectady is a city located in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. ... Public relations (PR) is the means and industry of influencing public opinion towards an organization and its products or services. ... The General Electric Company, or GE, NYSE: GE is a multinational technology and services company. ...


From 1970 to 2000, Vonnegut lived in an East Side Manhattan brownstone, with his wife, the renowned photographer Jill Krementz. On January 31, 2000, a fire destroyed the top story of his home. Vonnegut suffered smoke inhalation and was hospitalized in critical condition for four days. He survived, but his personal archives were destroyed, and after leaving the hospital he retired to Northampton, Massachusetts. He taught an advanced writing class at Smith College for a period in 2000, and he was recognized as New York State Author for 2001-2003. Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Four-story brownstones in Harlem, just south of 125th Street, 2004 Romanesque revival building in Colorado, built in 1890 Brownstone is a brown sandstone which was once a popular building material. ... Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Northampton, Massachusetts Main Street Northampton is a city located in Hampshire County, Massachusetts in the USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 28,978. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators {{{Senators}}} Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... Smith College campus center Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Vonnegut is a humanist; he currently serves as Honorary President of the American Humanist Association, having replaced Isaac Asimov in what Vonnegut calls "that totally functionless capacity". He was deeply influenced by early socialist labor leaders, especially Indiana natives Powers Hapgood and Eugene V. Debs, and he frequently quotes them in his work. He is a lifetime member of the American Civil Liberties Union, and recently did a print advertisement for them. Humanism is a system of thought that defines a socio-political doctrine (-ism) whose bounds exceed those of locally developed cultures, to include all of humanity and all issues common to human beings. ... The American Humanist Association is an American Humanist group serving both secular and religious humanists. ... Dr. Isaac Asimov enthroned with symbols of his lifes work (Rowena Morrill) Dr. Isaac Asimov (c. ... The color red and particularly the red flag are traditional symbols of Socialism. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader and five-time Socialist Party candidate for President of the United States. ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non-governmental organization whose stated goal is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person . ...


He currently writes for the magazine In These Times, focusing on subjects ranging from contemptuous criticism of the George W. Bush administration to simple observational pieces on topics like a trip to the post office. In 2005, many of his essays were collected in a new book entitled A Man Without A Country. Spurred in part by appearances on TV talk shows including Real Time with Bill Maher and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, the book became a bestseller. Vonnegut referred to the book's success as "a nice glass of champagne at the end of a life," although the emotionally-charged essays belied no diminished energy on the author's part. In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart on the set of The Daily Show The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, also known as TDS to fans and staffers) is a half-hour satirical fake news program produced by and run on the Comedy Central cable television network in... A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on a list of top-sellers. ...


Writing career

His first short story, "Report On the Barnhouse Effect" appeared in 1950. His background at GE influenced his first novel, the dystopian science fiction novel Player Piano (1952), in which human workers have been largely replaced by machines. He continued to write science fiction short stories before his second novel, The Sirens of Titan, was published in 1959. Through the 1960s the form of his work changed, from the orthodox science fiction of Cat's Cradle (which in 1971 got him his master's degree) to the acclaimed, semiautobiographical Slaughterhouse-Five, given a more experimental structure by using time travel as a plot device. This article is about the philosophical concept. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ... See also: 1951 in literature, other events of 1952, 1953 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Sirens of Titan (1959) is a science fiction novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... See also: 1958 in literature, other events of 1959, 1960 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... Cats Cradle (ISBN 038533348X) is a 1963 science fiction novel by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


These structural experiments were continued in Breakfast of Champions (1973), which included many rough illustrations, lengthy non-sequiturs and an appearance by the author himself, as a deus ex machina. Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Deus ex machina (plural dei ex machinis) is Latin for god from the machine and is a calque from the Greek από μηχανής θεός, (pronounced apO mekhanEHS theOS). It originated with Greek and Roman theater, when a mechane would lower a god or gods onstage to resolve a hopeless situation. ...

"This is a very bad book you're writing," I said to myself.
"I know," I said.
"You're afraid you'll kill yourself the way your mother did," I said.
"I know," I said.

Vonnegut's mother committed suicide while he was in his early twenties. He himself attempted suicide in 1985 and later wrote about this in several essays. Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed or attempted the act. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed or attempted the act. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Many hostile reviewers found the book formless, but it became one of his best sellers. It includes, beyond the author himself, several of Vonnegut's recurring characters. One of them, Kilgore Trout, plays a major role and interacts with the author's character. Other cameos include Eliot Rosewater from God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater and Francine Pefko from Cat's Cradle. (Kazak, a dog from Galápagos and The Sirens of Titan, was apparently a major character in an earlier draft; she attacks Vonnegut's character as retribution for being cut out.) Kilgore Trout is a fictional character created by author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Eliot Rosewater is a recurring character in the novels of American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... God Bless You, Mr. ... Cats Cradle (ISBN 038533348X) is a 1963 science fiction novel by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... The novel Galápagos is Kurt Vonneguts look at evolution, first published in 1985. ... The Sirens of Titan (1959) is a science fiction novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ...


Although many of his later novels involved science fiction themes, they were widely read and reviewed outside the field, not least due to their anti-authoritarianism, which matched the prevailing mood of the United States in the 1960s. For example, his seminal short story Harrison Bergeron graphically demonstrates how even the (to most) noble sentiment of egalitarianism, when combined with too much authority, becomes horrific repression. A case could be made for Vonnegut's form of political satire through extrapolation and exaggeration requiring a science fiction theme, simply as a milieu for proposing alternative systems, while remaining essentially political satire nonetheless. It is therefore easy for those ignorant of science fiction's long-established (and, for commentators such as Kingsley Amis, dominant) vein of satire to claim that Vonnegut does not write science fiction. However, his work is clearly in the science-fictional tradition descended from Swift's Gulliver's Travels. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... The dystopian short story Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut, opens with the line Spoiler warning: Unfortunately, this equality has been achieved by handicapping the most intelligent, athletic or beautiful members of society down to the level of the lowest common denominator, a process central to the society which is overseen... Egalitarianism is the moral doctrine that equality ought to prevail throughout society. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Anglo-Irish writer who is famous for works like Gullivers Travels and A Tale of a Tub. ... Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735) is a work of fiction by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the travellers tales literary sub-genre. ...


In much of his work Vonnegut's own voice is apparent, often filtered through the character of science fiction author Kilgore Trout (based on real-life science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon), characterized by wild leaps of imagination and a deep cynicism, tempered by humanism. In the foreword to Breakfast of Champions, Vonnegut wrote that as a child, he saw men with locomotor ataxia, and it struck him that these men walked like broken machines; it followed that healthy people were working machines, suggesting that humans are helpless prisoners of determinism. Vonnegut also explored this pessimistic theme in Slaughterhouse-Five, in which protagonist Billy Pilgrim "has come unstuck in time" and has so little control over his own life that he cannot even predict which part of it he will be living through from minute to minute. Kilgore Trout is a fictional character created by author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 – May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ... Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Tabes dorsalis (also called locomotor ataxia) is a late form of syphilis resulting in a degeneration of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and marked by shooting pains, emaciation, loss of muscular coordination (resulting in the wide-based unsteady gait characteristic of the disease), and disturbances of sensation and... Determinism is the philosophical proposition that every event, including human cognition and action, is causally determined by an unbroken chain of prior occurrences. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


In 1974 Venus on the Half-Shell, a book by Philip José Farmer aping the style of Vonnegut and attributed to Kilgore Trout, was published. This action caused a falling out of the two friends and some confusion amongst readers. 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... Venus on the Half-Shell, first published in 1975, is a science fiction novel attributed to the fictional author Kilgore Trout but actually written by Philip José Farmer. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ...


According to a 1996 online interview, Vonnegut said he had "sold the [film] rights to Cat's Cradle outright and for all eternity to Hilly Elkins, who has never done anything with it and never will and won't sell it back. Cat's Cradle now lies at a crossroads with a stake through its heart. Jerry Garcia had the rights to [The] Sirens of Titan for many years. When he died, we bought the rights back from his estate. Player Piano was bought outright by Ed Pressman quite a while ago. We've been talking to him, asking him to do something with it or let us have it back." Jerry Garcia in his youth Jerome John Jerry Garcia (August 1, 1942 – August 9, 1995) was famous as guitarist and primary singer of the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead, though his extensive career involved many other projects. ... Edward R. Pressman (born 1943) is a film producer. ...


Design career

His work as a graphic artist got its start in the illustrations he did for Slaughterhouse-Five and, more particularly, in Breakfast of Champions, which included numerous felt-tip pen illustrations of sphincters and other, less indelicate images. As he lost interest in writing, his focus shifted to graphics artwork, particularly silk-screen prints, pursued in collaboration with Joe Petro III in the 1990s. Categories: Stub | Writing instruments ... From late Latin sphincter, from Greek sphinkter, band, contractile muscle, from sphingein, to bind tight. ... Screen-printing, also known as silkscreening or serigraphy, is a printmaking technique that creates a sharp-edged single-color image using a stencil and a porous fabric. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ...


More recently, Vonnegut participated in the project The Greatest Album Covers That Never Were, where he created an album cover for Phish called Hook, Line and Sinker, which has been included in a traveling exhibition for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Phish was an American band noted for its technical prowess and live performances, particularly its extended jams and improvisation. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the background The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum and institution in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential...


Family

Kurt Vonnegut has seven children (three biological and four adopted). Two of these children have published books, including his only son, Mark Vonnegut, who wrote The Eden Express: A Memoir of Insanity, about his experiences in the late 1960s and his major psychotic breakdown and recovery; the tendency to insanity he acknowledged may be partly hereditary, influencing him to take up the study of medicine and orthomolecular psychiatry. Mark was named after Mark Twain, whom Vonnegut considered an American saint. Mark Vonnegut, son of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... The Eden Express: A Memoir of Insanity, is a 1975 book by Mark Vonnegut, son of American writer Kurt Vonnegut, about his experiences in the late 1960s and his major psychotic breakdown and recovery. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... This article is about the mental state. ... Psychiatry is the branch of medicine that diagnoses, treats, and studies mental illness and behavioral conditions. ... Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was a famous and popular American humorist, novelist, writer and lecturer. ...


His daughter Edith Vonnegut, an artist, has also had her work published, in a book entitled Domestic Goddesses. Edith was once married to Geraldo Rivera. She was named after Kurt Vonnegut's mother, Edith Lieber. His youngest daughter is Nanette, named after Nanette Schnull, Vonnegut's paternal grandmother. He is also the younger brother of atmospheric scientist Bernard Vonnegut, now deceased. Edith Vonnegut is an artist. ... User:nobody Geraldo Rivera on the Fox News Channel in 2004. ... Atmospheric sciences is an umbrella term for the study of the atmosphere, its processes, the effects other systems have on the atmosphere, and the effects of the atmosphere on these other systems. ... Dr. Bernard Vonnegut (August 29, 1914 – April 25, 1997) was an atmospheric scientist credited with discovering that silver iodide could be used effectively in cloud seeding to produce snow and rain. ...


Vonnegut's three adopted children are his nephews: James, Steven and Kurt Adams. They were adopted after a traumatic twenty-four-hour period, in which their father's commuter train went off an open drawbridge in New Jersey and their mother, Kurt's sister Alice, died of cancer. The fourth and youngest of the boys, Peter Nice, went to live with a first cousin of their father in Birmingham, Alabama as an infant. Birmingham is the largest city in the U.S. state of Alabama and the county seat of Jefferson County. ...


Trivia

Vonnegut smokes Pall Mall cigarettes, which he claims are a "classy" way to commit suicide. 1: cigar box 2: cigar 3: various pipes 4: waterpipe 5: joss stick 6: bong Various smoking equipment including different pipes, and cigars. ... Pall Mall Non-filter pack of Cigarettes Pall Mall cigarettes are a brand of cigarettes produced by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... A cigarette will burn to ash on one end. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed or attempted the act. ...


Vonnegut used to run a car dealership called "Saab Cape Cod" in West Barnstable, Massachusetts but he failed to sell the Swedish two-stroke SAAB cars, and went into bankruptcy. He has jokingly said that this may be the reason he has never received a Nobel prize. [1] Saab 9-3 Sport Sedan Saab Automobile AB is a Swedish automobile maker, now owned by General Motors. ... Cape Cod and the Massachusetts and Rhode Island coastline Cape Cod and Cape Cod Bay from space, April 1997. ... West Barnstable is a village in the city of Barnstable, Massachusetts. ... The two-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine differs from the more common four-stroke cycle by having only two strokes (linear movements of the piston) instead of four, although the same four operations (intake, compression, power, exhaust) still occur. ... Saab 93B 1959 The Saab 93 is an automobile manufactured by Saab. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Sir Edward Appletons medal Photographs of Nobel Prize Medals. ...


He was a close friend of fellow author (and World War II veteran) Joseph Heller. Joseph Heller in 1961 Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 - December 12, 1999) was an American satirist best remembered for writing the satiric World War II classic Catch-22. ...


The asteroid 25399 Vonnegut is named in his honour. An asteroid is a small, solid object in our Solar System, orbiting the Sun. ...


There was a widely-circulated urban legend on the Internet that Kurt Vonnegut gave a commencement address at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997 in which he advised students to wear sunscreen - the main theme and title of a quite odd pop song by Baz Luhrmann. In fact, the commencement speaker at MIT in 1997 was Kofi Annan and the putative Vonnegut speech was an article published in the Chicago Tribune on June 1, 1997 by columnist Mary Schmich. Urban legends are a kind of folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them (see rumor). ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research and educational institution located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is a widely renowned leader in science and technology, as well as in many other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Baz Luhrmann (born Mark Anthony Luhrmann, New South Wales, September 17, 1962) is an Australian film director. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Chicago Tribune, formerly self-styled as the Worlds Greatest Newspaper, remains the leading daily newspaper of the Midwestern United States. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mary Schmich is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune. ...


Vonnegut did, however, play himself in a cameo in 1986's Back To School, starring Rodney Dangerfield, and is invoked as a pop culture reference in many teen flicks such as "Can't Hardly Wait," in which the character Preston (Ethan Embry) is bound for Massachusetts to attend a writing seminar by the acclaimed author. He also appears very briefly in Keith Gordon's film of his novel Mother Night. 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rodney Dangerfield in 1997 Rodney Dangerfield (November 22, 1921 - October 5, 2004), born Jacob Cohen, was an American comedian and actor, best known for the line I dont get no respect and his monologues on that theme. ... Ethan Embry is an American actor. ... Keith Gordon is an American actor turned film director. ... Mother Night is a novel first published in 1961 and written by the American author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ...


Vonnegut also has a brief cameo as a TV commercial director in the film version of Breakfast of Champions. Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


Bibliography

Novels

The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Sirens of Titan (1959) is a science fiction novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mother Night is a novel first published in 1961 and written by the American author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Cats Cradle (ISBN 038533348X) is a 1963 science fiction novel by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... God Bless You, Mr. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... Slapstick, or Lonesome No More is a science fiction novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jailbird is Kurt Vonneguts 1979 fictional novel about a man recently released from a low security prison. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Deadeye Dick is a 1982 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The novel Galápagos is Kurt Vonneguts look at evolution, first published in 1985. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kurt Vonneguts Bluebeard was written in 1988 and describes the late years of fictional Abstract Expressionist painter Rabo Karabekian, who first appeared, rather briefly, in Breakfast of Champions. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hocus Pocus is a 1990 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Short story collections

1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Welcome to the Monkey House is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Bagombo Snuff Box is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

Collected essays

Wampeters, Foma & Granfalloons (Opinions) is a collection of essays, reviews, short travel accounts, and human interest stories written by Kurt Vonnegut from c. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a collection of short interviews written by Vonnegut and first broadcast on NPR. The text of these interviews makes up the content of . ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Brilliant ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Plays

Happy Birthday, Wanda June is the 1971 film adaptation of the play by the same name by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Between Time and Timbuktu is a television adaptation of Kurt Vonneguts science fiction novels and stories, and the title of a book containing the script of the broadcast. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Histoire du soldat (sometimes written Lhistoire du soldat; translated as The Soldiers Tale or A Soldiers Tale) is a 1918 theatrical work to be read, played, and danced (lue, jouée et dansée) set to music by Igor Stravinsky. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...

Film adaptations

Happy Birthday, Wanda June is the 1971 film adaptation of the play by the same name by Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Slapstick, or Lonesome No More is a science fiction novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Who Am I This Time? is a short story written by Kurt Vonnegut in the 1950s. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The dystopian short story Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut, opens with the line Spoiler warning: Unfortunately, this equality has been achieved by handicapping the most intelligent, athletic or beautiful members of society down to the level of the lowest common denominator, a process central to the society which is overseen... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mother Night is a novel first published in 1961 and written by the American author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Kurt Vonnegut's website
  • a tribute website
  • His life & work displayed in a site called The Vonnegut Web
  • "Cold Turkey," an essay by Vonnegut
  • Kurt Vonnegut's address to the graduating class at Bennington College, 1970
  • A transcript of an AOL online interview from November 22, 1996, done by Jesse Kornbluth and Robert B. Weide
  • "I Love You, Madame Librarian," an article by Vonnegut
  • The End is Near - Column by Vonnegut in In These Times
  • Requiem for a Dreamer - Column by Vonnegut in In These Times
  • New York State of Mind - Column about Vonnegut being named State Author
  • Vonnegut's Condition Unchanged Following Fire
  • Random House Author Catalog On Vonnegut
  • Kilgore Trout
  • Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database
  • 1981 audio interview of Kurt Vonnegut by Don Swaim of CBS Radio, RealAudio
  • Evolutionary Mythology in the Writings of Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
  • Video clip of talk show appearance "Daily Show", September 2005
  • "Liberal Crap I Never Want to Hear Again"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kurt Vonnegut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1879 words)
Kurt Vonnegut was born to fourth-generation German-American parents in Indianapolis, the setting for many of his novels.
Vonnegut is a humanist; he currently serves as Honorary President of the American Humanist Association, having replaced Isaac Asimov in what Vonnegut calls "that totally functionless capacity".
Vonnegut did, however, play himself in a cameo in 1986's Back To School, starring Rodney Dangerfield, and is invoked as a pop culture reference in many teen flicks such as "Can't Hardly Wait," in which the character Preston (Ethan Embry) is bound for Massachusetts to attend a writing seminar by the acclaimed author.
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - definition of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in Encyclopedia (1453 words)
Kurt Vonnegut, Junior (born November 11, 1922) is an American novelist, satirist, and most recently, graphic artist.
Vonnegut is a self-proclaimed humanist and socialist (influenced by the style of Indiana's own Eugene V. Debs) and has recently done a print advertisement for the American Civil Liberties Union.
Kurt Vonnegut has several offspring who have published books, including a son, Mark Vonnegut, who wrote The Eden Express, about his experiences in the late 1960s and his major psychotic breakdown and recovery; the tendency to insanity he acknowledged may be partly hereditary, influencing him to take up the study of medicine and orthomolecular psychiatry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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