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Encyclopedia > Kurt Vonnegut
Kurt Vonnegut
170x256
Vonnegut in 2004
Born Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
November 11, 1922(1922-11-11)
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Died April 11, 2007 (aged 84)
New York, New York, United States
Occupation Novelist, Essayist
Nationality American
Writing period 1950-2005
Genres Literary fiction
Satire
Black comedy
Science Fiction

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (November 11, 1922April 11, 2007) (pronounced /ˈvɒnəgət/) was a prolific and genre-bending American novelist known for works blending satire, black comedy, and science fiction, such as Slaughterhouse-Five (1969), Cat's Cradle (1963), and Breakfast of Champions (1973).[2] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Literary fiction is a somewhat uneasy term that has come into common usage since around 1970, principally to distinguish serious fiction from the many types of genre fiction and popular fiction. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... This article is about the tone of comedy. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Louis-Ferdinand Céline was the pen name of French writer and doctor Louis-Ferdinand Destouches (May 27, 1894 – July 1, 1961). ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... William March (born William Edward Campbell September 18, 1893 in Mobile, Alabama) was an American World War I soldier, short-story writer and novelist cited as being the unrecognized genius of our time. His innovative writing style is characterized by a deep compassion and understanding of suffering. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... Powers Hapgood (28 December 1899- 4 February 1949) was an American Trade Union Organizer and Socialist Party leader known for his involvement with the United Mine Workers in the 1920s. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... For the political scientist, see James A. Thurber. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... William McGuire Bill Bryson, OBE, (born December 8, 1951 in Des Moines, Iowa) is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. ... Paul Auster Paul Benjamin Auster (born February 3, 1947, Newark, New Jersey) is a Brooklyn-based author. ... T. Coraghessan Boyle (also known as T.C. Boyle, born Thomas John Boyle on December 2, 1948) is a U.S. novelist and short story writer. ... (JCV) redirects here. ... Louis Sachar (IPA: , or Sacker) (born March 20, 1954) is an American author of childrens books who is best known for the Sideways Stories From Wayside School book series and the 1998 novel Holes, for which Sachar won a National Book Award and the Newbery Medal. ... George Saunders (born December 2, 1958) is an acclaimed American writer of short stories. ... Haruki Murakami , born January 12, 1949) is a popular contemporary Japanese writer and translator. ... Carlton Mellick III (July 2nd, 1977, Phoenix, Arizona) US Author currently residing in Portland, Oregon. ... Kula Shaker are an English multi-platinum selling psychedelic rock band who came to prominence during the Britpop era. ... Chris Bachelder is an American writer, e-book pioneer and frequent contributor to the publications McSweeneys Quarterly Concern and The Believer. ... Image:Http://www. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... This article is about the tone of comedy. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ...

Contents

Life

Early years

Kurt Vonnegut was born to fourth-generation German-American parents, son and grandson of architects in the Indianapolis firm Vonnegut & Bohn, on Armistice Day.[3] As a student at Shortridge High School in Indianapolis,[4] Vonnegut worked on the nation's first daily high school newspaper, The Daily Echo. He attended Cornell University from 1940 to 1943[5], where he served as assistant managing editor and associate editor for the student newspaper, the Cornell Daily Sun, and majored in chemistry[6]. While attending Cornell, he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity, following in the footsteps of his father. While at Cornell, Vonnegut enlisted in the U.S. Army. The army sent him to the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and the University of Tennessee to study mechanical engineering.[2] On May 14, 1944, Mothers' Day, his mother, Edith S. (Lieber) Vonnegut[7], committed suicide.[8] German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... Shortridge High School is a public high school located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Cornell redirects here. ... The Cornell Daily Sun, of Cornell University, is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Delta Upsilon (ΔY) is one of the oldest international, all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities and is the first non-secret fraternity ever founded. ... Carnegie Mellon University (also known as CMU) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A celebratory cookie. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


World War II

Photo of Dresden shortly after the bombing.
Photo of Dresden shortly after the bombing.

Kurt Vonnegut's experience as a soldier and prisoner of war had a profound influence on his later work. As a Private with the 106th Infantry Division, Vonnegut was cut off from his battalion along with 5 other battalion scouts and wandered behind enemy lines for several days until captured by Wehrmacht troops on December 14, 1944.[9] Imprisoned in Dresden, Vonnegut witnessed the fire bombing of Dresden in February 1945, which destroyed most of the city. Vonnegut was one of a few American prisoners of war in Dresden to survive, in their cell in an underground meat locker of a slaughterhouse that had been converted to a prison camp. The administration building had the postal address Schlachthof Fünf (Slaughterhouse Five) which the prisoners took to using as the name for the whole camp. Vonnegut recalled the facility as "Utter destruction", "carnage unfathomable." The Germans put him to work gathering bodies for mass burial. "But there were too many corpses to bury. So instead the Nazis sent in troops with flamethrowers. All these civilians' remains were burned to ashes."[10] This experience formed the core of one of his most famous works, Slaughterhouse-Five, and is a theme in at least six other books.[10] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The 106th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War II well known to be the hardest hit division of the Battle of the Bulge. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... The bombing of Dresden, led by Royal Air Force (RAF) and followed by the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) between February 13 and February 15, 1945, remains one of the more controversial Allied actions of World War II. The exact number of casualties is uncertain, but most historians agree... For the Batman villain, see Abattoir (comics). ... Riverboat of the U.S. Brownwater Navy shooting ignited napalm from its mounted flamethrower during the Vietnam war. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


Vonnegut was freed by Red Army troops in May 1945. Upon returning to America, he was awarded a Purple Heart for what he called a "ludicrously negligible wound,"[11] later writing in Timequake that he was given the decoration after suffering a case of "frostbite."[12] For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... This article is about a medical condition. ...


Post-war career

After the war, Vonnegut attended the University of Chicago as a graduate student in anthropology and also worked as a police reporter at the City News Bureau of Chicago. According to Vonnegut in Bagombo Snuff Box, the university rejected his first thesis on the necessity of accounting for the similarities between Cubist painters and the leaders of late 19th century Native American uprisings, saying it was "unprofessional." He left Chicago to work in Schenectady, New York, in public relations for General Electric. The University of Chicago later accepted his novel Cat's Cradle as his thesis, citing its anthropological content and awarded him the M.A. degree in 1971.[13][14] For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article is about the social science. ... City News Bureau of Chicago, or City Press, was one of the first cooperative news agencies in the United States. ... Bagombo Snuff Box (ISBN 0399145052) is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut published in 1999. ... Georges Braque, Woman with a guitar, 1913 Cubism was a 20th century art movement, pioneered by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music and literature. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Schenectady (pronounced ; Θkahnéhtati[1] in Tuscarora) is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. ... This article is about the state. ... For the Arrested Development episode, see Public Relations (Arrested Development episode). ... GE redirects here. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ...


On the verge of abandoning writing, Vonnegut was offered a teaching job at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. While he was there, Cat's Cradle became a best-seller, and he began Slaughterhouse-Five, now considered one of the best American novels of the 20th century, appearing on the 100 best lists of Time magazine[15] and the Modern Library.[16] The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900-acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... The Program in Creative Writing, more commonly known as the Iowa Writers Workshop, at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa is a graduate-level creative writing program in the United States. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... TIME redirects here. ...


Early in his adult life, he moved to Barnstable, Massachusetts, a town on Cape Cod.[17] Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Barnstable County Settled 1637 Incorporated 1638 Government  - Type Council-manager city  - Town    Manager John C. Klimm Area  - City  76. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the area of Massachusetts known as Cape Cod. For other uses, see Cape Cod (disambiguation). ...


Personal life

The author was known as Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., until his father's death in October 1957; after that he was known simply as Kurt Vonnegut. He was also the younger brother of Bernard Vonnegut, an atmospheric scientist who discovered that silver iodide could be used for cloud seeding, the process of artificial stimulation of rain. Dr. Bernard Vonnegut (August 29, 1914 – April 25, 1997) was an atmospheric scientist credited with discovering that silver iodide could be used effectively in cloud seeding to produce snow and rain. ... Silver iodide (AgI) is a chemical compound used in photography, an antiseptic in medicine, rainmaking and cloud seeding. ... Cessna 210 with cloud seeding equipment Cloud seeding, a form of weather modification, is the attempt to change the amount or type of precipitation that falls from clouds, by dispersing substances into the air that serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. ...


He married his childhood sweetheart, Jane Marie Cox, after returning from World War II, but the couple separated in 1970. He did not divorce Cox until 1979, but from 1970 Vonnegut lived with the woman who would later become his second wife, photographer Jill Krementz.[2] Krementz and Vonnegut were married after the divorce from Cox was finalized. Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ...


He raised seven children: three with his first wife, three more born to his sister Alice and adopted by Vonnegut after she died of cancer, and a seventh, Lily, adopted with Krementz. Two of these children have published books, including his only biological son, Mark Vonnegut, who wrote The Eden Express: A Memoir of Insanity, about his experiences in the late 1960s and his major psychotic breakdown and recovery; the tendency to insanity he acknowledged may be partly hereditary, influencing him to take up the study of medicine and orthomolecular psychiatry. Mark was named after Mark Twain, whom Vonnegut considered an American saint.[18] Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Mark Vonnegut is an American pediatrician and writer He is the son of noted writer Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... The Eden Express: A Memoir of Insanity, is a 1975 book by Mark Vonnegut, son of American writer Kurt Vonnegut, about his experiences in the late 1960s and his major psychotic breakdown and recovery. ... For other uses, see Psychosis (disambiguation). ... Orthomolecular medicine and optimum nutrition are controversial medical and health approaches[1] that posit that many diseases and abnormalities result from various chemical imbalances or deficiencies and can be prevented, treated, or sometimes cured by achieving optimal levels of naturally occurring chemical substances, such as vitamins, dietary minerals, enzymes, antioxidants... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Saints redirects here. ...


His daughter Edith ("Edie"), an artist, was named after Kurt Vonnegut's mother, Edith Lieber. She has had her work published in a book titled Domestic Goddesses and was once married to Geraldo Rivera. His youngest daughter, Nanette ("Nanny"), was named after Nanette Schnull, Vonnegut's paternal grandmother. She is married to realist painter Scott Prior and is the subject of several of his paintings, notably "Nanny and Rose". Edith Vonnegut is an artist. ... Geraldo redirects here. ...


Of Vonnegut's four adopted children, three are his nephews: James, Steven, and Kurt Adams; the fourth is Lily, a girl he adopted as an infant in 1982. James, Steven, and Kurt were adopted after a traumatic week in 1958, in which their father James Carmalt Adams was killed on September 15 in the Newark Bay rail crash when his commuter train went off the open Newark Bay bridge in New Jersey, and their mother—Kurt's sister Alice—died of cancer. In Slapstick, Vonnegut recounts that Alice's husband died two days before Alice herself and her family tried to hide the knowledge from her, but she found out when an ambulatory patient gave her a copy of the New York Daily News a day before she herself died. The fourth and youngest of the boys, Peter Nice, went to live with a first cousin of their father in Birmingham, Alabama as an infant. Lily is a singer and actress. This article is about the domestic group. ... Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the psyche that occurs as a result of a traumatic event. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newark Bay rail disaster occurred on September 15, 1958 in Newark Bay, New Jersey. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Slapstick, or Lonesome No More! is a science fiction novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ...


On November 11, 1999, the asteroid 25399 Vonnegut was named in Vonnegut's honor.[19] is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ... 25399 Vonnegut is an asteroid discovered on November 11, 1999 by C. W. Juels at Fountain Hills. ...


On January 31, 2001, a fire destroyed the top story of his home. Vonnegut suffered smoke inhalation and was hospitalized in critical condition for four days. He survived, but his personal archives were destroyed. After leaving the hospital, he recuperated in Northampton, Massachusetts. is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Nickname: Motto: caritas, educatio, justitia Location in Hampshire County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampshire Settled and Charter granted 1654 Incorporated as a city 1884 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Mary Clare Higgins Area  - City  35. ...


Vonnegut smoked unfiltered Pall Mall cigarettes, which he claimed is a "classy way to commit suicide."[20] Pall Mall cigarettes are a brand of cigarettes produced by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and internationally by British American Tobacco at multiple sites. ... Unlit filtered cigarettes. ...


Death

Vonnegut died on April 11, 2007, in Manhattan after a fall at his Manhattan home several weeks prior resulted in irreversible brain injuries.[2][21][22] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Brain damage or brain injury is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. ...

Posthumous tributes

  • At the annual Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library McFadden Memorial Lecture at Butler University in Indianapolis, on April 27, 2007, where Vonnegut was being honored posthumously, his son Mark delivered a speech that the author wrote for the event, and which was reported as the last thing he wrote. It ends with this: "I thank you for your attention, and I'm outta here."[23]
  • Following his death, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart on Comedy Central gave Vonnegut a small tribute frame before the closing credits with his own famous phrase on death--"so it goes". There is also a short clip of him being interviewed by Jon Stewart, in which he claims that gonorrhea, giraffes and hippopotami are evidence of evolution being controlled by a divine power. This is also a theme used in his print artwork. Confetti print #26 states "Evolution is so creative. That's how come we got giraffes and the clap."
  • Filmmaker Michael Moore included Vonnegut in the dedications for his 2007 film Sicko; at the end of the film, the words "Thank You Kurt Vonnegut for Everything" come up on the screen.
  • The satirical newspaper The Onion also contained a tribute to Vonnegut soon after he died. In an incredibly rare instance of seriousness and respect for them, they paid a tribute to their fellow satirist by posting a notification of his death, followed by his famous quote "So it goes" and a humorous reference to his work Slaughterhouse Five stating that he shouldn't be referred to as dead "...without checking Dresden for his younger self first."[24]
  • Historian, friend, and fellow socialist Howard Zinn published an obituary retelling Vonnegut's literary contributions to the modern socialist movement.
  • For a brief period after Vonnegut's death, the front page of the website for the famous alt-rock band Wilco carried a phrase from one of the author's works out of respect: "If I should die, let this be my epitaph: HIS ONLY PROOF FOR THE EXISTENCE OF GOD WAS MUSIC".[citation needed]

The Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library (IMCPL) is the public library system that serves the citizens of Marion County, Indiana and its largest city, Indianapolis. ... Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart on the set of The Daily Show The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, also known as TDS to fans and staffers) is a half-hour satirical fake news program produced by and run on the Comedy Central cable television network in... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... Not to be confused with John Stewart, John Stuart or Jonathan Stewart. ... The clap redirects here. ... Binomial name Giraffa camelopardalis Linnaeus, 1758 The Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an even-toed ungulate mammal and the tallest of all land living animal species. ... Binomial name Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758 The Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) or Greek ίππόποταμος (hippos meaning horse and potamus meaning river) is a large, plant-eating African mammal, one of only two living and three (or four) recently extinct species in the family Hippopotamidae. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... For other uses, see Sicko (disambiguation). ... The Onion is a United States-based parody newspaper published weekly in print and daily online. ... Slaughterhouse-Five; or, The Childrens Crusade: A Duty-Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Howard Zinn (born August 24, 1922) is an American historian, political scientist, social critic, activist and playwright, best known as author of the bestseller[5] , A Peoples History of the United States. ... This article is about the music group. ...

Works

See also: List of works by Kurt Vonnegut

The following is a complete list of literary works by the late author Kurt Vonnegut. ...

Writing career

Vonnegut's first short story, "Report on the Barnhouse Effect" appeared in the February 11, 1950 edition of Collier's (it has since been reprinted in his short story collection, "Welcome to the Monkey House"). His first novel was the dystopian novel Player Piano (1952), in which human workers have been largely replaced by machines. He continued to write short stories before his second novel, The Sirens of Titan, was published in 1959.[25] Through the 1960s, the form of his work changed, from the relatively orthodox structure of Cat's Cradle (which in 1971 earned him a master's degree) to the acclaimed, semiautobiographical Slaughterhouse-Five, given a more experimental structure by using time travel as a plot device. Report on the Barnhouse Effect is a Kurt Vonnegut short story that is part of the collection Welcome to the Monkey House. ... Colliers Weekly was a United States magazine that was published between 1888 and 1957. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ... This article is about the Kurt Vonnegut novel The Sirens of Titan. For other uses, see Siren (disambiguation). ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ...


These structural experiments were continued in Breakfast of Champions (1973), which included many rough illustrations, lengthy non-sequiturs and an appearance by the author himself, as a deus ex machina. For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ... For other uses, see Deus ex machina (disambiguation). ...

"This is a very bad book you're writing," I said to myself.
"I know," I said.
"You're afraid you'll kill yourself the way your mother did," I said.
"I know," I said.

Vonnegut attempted suicide in 1984 and later wrote about this in several essays.[26]


Breakfast of Champions became one of his best-selling novels. It includes, in addition to the author himself, several of Vonnegut's recurring characters. One of them, science fiction author Kilgore Trout, plays a major role and interacts with the author's character. Kilgore Trout is a fictional character created by author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


In addition to recurring characters, there are also recurring themes and ideas. One of them is ice-nine (a central wampeter in his novel Cat's Cradle), said to be a new form of ice with a different crystal structure from normal ice. When a crystal of ice-nine is brought into contact with liquid water, it becomes a seed that "teaches" the molecules of liquid water to arrange themselves into ice-nine. This process is not easily reversible, however, as the melting point of ice-nine is 114.4 degrees Fahrenheit (45.8 degrees Celsius). Ice-9 is a fictional material conceived by science fiction writer Kurt Vonnegut in his novel Cats Cradle. ... Bokononism is the fictional religion practiced by many of the characters in Kurt Vonneguts novel Cats Cradle. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... A seed crystal is a small piece of single crystal material from which a large crystal of, usually, the same material is to be grown. ... 3D (left and center) and 2D (right) representations of the terpenoid molecule atisane. ... The melting point of a solid is the temperature range at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ...


Although many of his novels involved science fiction themes, they were widely read and reviewed outside the field, not least due to their anti-authoritarianism. For example, his seminal short story Harrison Bergeron graphically demonstrates how an ethos like egalitarianism, when combined with too much authority, engenders horrific repression. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article applies to political and organizational ideologies. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Ethos (ἦθος) (plurals: ethe, ethea) is a Greek word originally meaning the place of living that can be translated into English in different ways. ... Egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal, meaning equal or level) is a political doctrine that holds that all people should be treated as equals from birth. ...


In much of his work, Vonnegut's own voice is apparent, often filtered through the character of science fiction author Kilgore Trout (whose name is based on that of real-life science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon), characterized by wild leaps of imagination and a deep cynicism, tempered by humanism. In the foreword to Breakfast of Champions, Vonnegut wrote that as a child, he saw men with locomotor ataxia, and it struck him that these men walked like broken machines; it followed that healthy people were working machines, suggesting that humans are helpless prisoners of determinism. Vonnegut also explored this theme in Slaughterhouse-Five, in which protagonist Billy Pilgrim "has come unstuck in time" and has so little control over his own life that he cannot even predict which part of it he will be living through from minute to minute. Vonnegut's well-known phrase "So it goes", used ironically in reference to death, also originated in Slaughterhouse-Five and became a slogan for anti-Vietnam War protestors in the 1960s. "Its combination of simplicity, irony, and rue is very much in the Vonnegut vein."[21] Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 Staten Island, New York – May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ... Tabes dorsalis (also called locomotor ataxia) is a late form of syphilis resulting in a degeneration of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and marked by shooting pains, emaciation, loss of muscular coordination (resulting in the wide-based unsteady gait characteristic of the disease), and disturbances of sensation and... This article is about the general notion of determinism in philosophy. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


With the publication of his novel Timequake in 1997, Vonnegut announced his retirement from writing fiction. He continued to write for the magazine In These Times, where he was a senior editor,[27] until his death in 2007, focusing on subjects ranging from contemporary U.S. politics to simple observational pieces on topics such as a trip to the post office. In 2005, many of his essays were collected in a new bestselling book titled A Man Without a Country, which he insisted would be his last contribution to letters.[28] Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ... A Man Without a Country is a collection of essays published in 2005 by the author Kurt Vonnegut. ...


An August 2006 article reported:

He has stalled finishing his highly anticipated novel If God Were Alive Today—or so he claims. "I've given up on it ... It won't happen. ... The Army kept me on because I could type, so I was typing other people's discharges and stuff. And my feeling was, 'Please, I've done everything I was supposed to do. Can I go home now?' That's what I feel right now. I've written books. Lots of them. Please, I've done everything I'm supposed to do. Can I go home now?"[10]

The April 2008 issue of Playboy will feature the first published excerpt from the upcoming posthumously published Vonnegut book. It will be a collection of short stories never before published. April 2008 is the fourth month of the current leap year. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Posthumous means after death. ...


In April 2008, the only posthumous book by Vonnegut, Armageddon in Retrospect, was published. It included never before published short stories by the writer and a letter that was written to his family during WWII when Vonnegut was captured as a prisoner of war. The book also contains drawings that Vonnegut himself drew and a few speeches that he gave. The introduction of the book was written by his son, Mark Vonnegut. April 2008 is the fourth month of the current leap year. ...


Design career

Vonnegut's work as a graphic artist began with his illustrations for Slaughterhouse-Five and developed with Breakfast of Champions, which included numerous felt-tip pen illustrations, such as anal sphincters, and other less scatological images. Later in his career, he became more interested in artwork, particularly silk-screen prints, pursued in collaboration with Joe Petro III. Screen-printing, also known as silkscreening or serigraphy, is a printmaking technique that creates a sharp-edged single-color image using a stencil and a porous fabric. ... Joe Petro III (May 3, 1956 – ) is a second generation fine artist, who works as a sculptor in bronze, clay and printmaking on silk-screen and hand-made paper. ...


In 2004, Vonnegut participated in the project The Greatest Album Covers That Never Were, where he created an album cover for Phish called Hook, Line and Sinker, which has been included in a traveling exhibition for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This article is about the band. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ...


Beliefs

Politics

He was deeply influenced by early socialist labor leaders, especially Indiana natives Powers Hapgood and Eugene V. Debs, and he frequently quotes them in his work. He named characters after both Debs (Eugene Debs Hartke in Hocus Pocus and Eugene Debs Metzger in Deadeye Dick) and Russian Communist leader Leon Trotsky (Leon Trotsky Trout in Galápagos). He was a lifetime member of the American Civil Liberties Union and was featured in a print advertisement for them. Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Powers Hapgood (28 December 1899- 4 February 1949) was an American Trade Union Organizer and Socialist Party leader known for his involvement with the United Mine Workers in the 1920s. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Leon Trotsky (Russian:  , Lev Davidovich Trotsky, also transliterated Leo, Lyev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij, Trockij and Trotzky) (November 7 [O.S. October 26] 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (), was a Ukrainian-born Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist theorist. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is an American organization consisting of two separate entities: the ACLU Foundation, a non-profit organization that focuses on litigation and communication efforts, and the American Civil Liberties Union which focuses on legislative lobbying and does not have non-profit status. ...


Vonnegut frequently addressed moral and political issues but rarely dealt with specific political figures until after his retirement from fiction. (Although the downfall of Walter Starbuck, a minor Nixon administration bureaucrat who is the narrator and main character in Jailbird (1979), would not have occurred but for the Watergate scandal, the focus is not on the administration.) His collection God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian referenced controversial assisted suicide proponent Jack Kevorkian. Nixon redirects here. ... Jailbird is Kurt Vonneguts 1979 fictional novel about a man recently released from a low security prison. ... Watergate redirects here. ... God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a collection of short interviews written by Vonnegut and first broadcast on NPR. The text of these interviews makes up the content of . ... Euthanasia (Greek, good death) is the practice of killing a person or animal, in a painless or minimally painful way, for merciful reasons, usually to end their suffering. ... Jack Kevorkian during his public appearance in January 2008 Jack Kevorkian (pronounced [1]) (born on May 26, 1928 [2]) is an American pathologist. ...


With his columns for In These Times, he began a blistering attack on the Bush administration and the Iraq war. "By saying that our leaders are power-drunk chimpanzees, am I in danger of wrecking the morale of our soldiers fighting and dying in the Middle East?" he wrote. "Their morale, like so many bodies, is already shot to pieces. They are being treated, as I never was, like toys a rich kid got for Christmas." In These Times quoted him as saying "The only difference between Hitler and Bush is that Hitler was elected."[29][30] In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ... George W. Bush administration is the administration of the 43rd president of the United States of America, 2001-present George H. W. Bush administration is the administration of the 41st president of the United States of America, 1989-1993 This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Type species Simia troglodytes Blumenbach, 1775 distribution of Species Pan troglodytes Pan paniscus Chimpanzee, often shortened to chimp, is the common name for the two extant species of apes in the genus Pan. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ... Hitler redirects here. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


In A Man Without a Country, he wrote that "George W. Bush has gathered around him upper-crust C-students who know no history or geography." He did not regard the 2004 election with much optimism; speaking of Bush and John Kerry, he said that "no matter which one wins, we will have a Skull and Bones President at a time when entire vertebrate species, because of how we have poisoned the topsoil, the waters and the atmosphere, are becoming, hey presto, nothing but skulls and bones."[31] A Man Without a Country is a collection of essays published in 2005 by the author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ...


In 2005, Vonnegut was interviewed by David Nason for The Australian. During the course of the interview Vonnegut was asked his opinion of modern terrorists, to which he replied, "I regard them as very brave people." When pressed further Vonnegut also said that "They [suicide bombers] are dying for their own self-respect. It's a terrible thing to deprive someone of their self-respect. It's [like] your culture is nothing, your race is nothing, you're nothing ... It is sweet and noble—sweet and honourable I guess it is—to die for what you believe in." (This last statement is a reference to the line "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori" ["it is sweet and appropriate to die for your country"] from Horace's Odes, or possibly to Wilfred Owen's ironic use of the line in his Dulce Et Decorum Est.) Nason took offense at Vonnegut's comments and characterized him as an old man who "doesn't want to live any more ... and because he can't find anything worthwhile to keep him alive, he finds defending terrorists somehow amusing." Vonnegut's son, Mark, responded to the article by writing an editorial to the Boston Globe in which he explained the reasons behind his father's "provocative posturing" and stated that "If these commentators can so badly misunderstand and underestimate an utterly unguarded English-speaking 83-year-old man with an extensive public record of saying exactly what he thinks, maybe we should worry about how well they understand an enemy they can't figure out what to call."[32] The Australian is a national daily broadsheet newspaper published by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... This article is becoming very long. ... For other uses, see Race. ... Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori is a line from the Roman lyrical poet Horaces Odes (iii 2. ... For other people named Horace, see Horace (disambiguation). ... Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918) was a British poet and soldier, regarded by many as the leading poet of the First World War. ... Dulce et Decorum Est is a poem written by British poet and World War I soldier Wilfred Owen in 1917, and published posthumously in 1920. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


A 2006 interview with Rolling Stone stated, " ... it's not surprising that he disdains everything about the Iraq War. The very notion that more than 2,500 U.S. soldiers have been killed in what he sees as an unnecessary conflict makes him groan. 'Honestly, I wish Nixon were president,' Vonnegut laments. 'Bush is so ignorant.' "[10] This article is about the magazine. ...


Religion

Vonnegut described himself variously as a skeptic,[33] freethinker,[34] humanist,[34] Unitarian Universalist,[35] agnostic,[33] and atheist.[36] Religious skepticism is a type of skepticism relating to religion, but should not be confused with atheism. ... Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be compromised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ... For the specific belief system, see Humanism (life stance). ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... Agnosticism (Greek: α- a-, without + γνώσις gnōsis, knowledge; after Gnosticism) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims — particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality — is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism, inherently unknowable. ... Atheist redirects here. ...


Vonnegut's views on religion were unconventional and nuanced. While rejecting the divinity of Jesus,[36] he was nevertheless an ardent admirer, and believed that Jesus' Beatitudes informed his own humanist outlook.[37] Despite describing freethought, humanism and agnosticism as his "ancestral religion," and despite being a Unitarian, he also spoke of himself as being irreligious.[34] In a press release by the American Humanist Association (of which Vonnegut was a prominent member), he was described as being "completely secular in his outlook."[38] This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Beatitudes (from Latin, beatitudo, happiness) is the beginning portion of the Sermon on the Mount of the Gospel of Matthew. ... This section does not cite its references or sources. ... The American Humanist Association (AHA) is an educational organization in the United States that advances Humanism. ... This article is about secularism. ...


Vonnegut called himself a religious skeptic, and disbelieved in the supernatural.[33] He considered religious doctrine to be "so much arbitrary, clearly invented balderdash," and believed people were motivated by loneliness to join religions.[39] Religious skepticism is a type of skepticism relating to religion, but should not be confused with atheism. ...


Vonnegut was descended from a family of German freethinkers, who were skeptical of "conventional religious beliefs."[40] His great-grandfather Clemens Vonnegut had authored a freethought book entitled Instruction in Morals, as well as an address for his own funeral in which he denied the existence of God, an afterlife, and Christian doctrines about sin and salvation. Kurt Vonnegut reproduced his great-grandfather's funeral address in his book Palm Sunday, and identified these freethought views as his "ancestral religion," declaring it a mystery as to how it was passed on to him.[33]


Vonnegut considered humanism to be a modern-day form of freethought,[41] and advocated for it in various writings, speeches and interviews. His ties to organized humanism included membership as a Humanist Laureate in the Council for Secular Humanism's International Academy of Humanism.[42] Vonnegut also served as honorary president of the American Humanist Association (AHA), having taken over the position from his late colleague Isaac Asimov, and serving until his own death in 2007.[43] In a letter to AHA members, Vonnegut wrote: "I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead."[38] The Council for Secular Humanism (originally the Council for Democratic and Secular Humanism, or CODESH) regards itself as the only exclusively secular humanist organization in the USA. In 1980 CODESH issued A Secular Humanist Declaration. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ...


Vonnegut identified himself as a Unitarian or Unitarian Universalist,[44] [35] and was at one time a member of a Unitarian congregation.[33] [45]Palm Sunday reproduces a sermon he delivered to the First Parish Unitarian Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts concerning William Ellery Channing, who was a principal founder of Unitarianism in the United States. In 1986, Vonnegut spoke to a gathering of Unitarian Universalists in Rochester, New York, and the text of his speech is reprinted in his book Fates Worse Than Death. Also reprinted in that book was a "mass" by Vonnegut, which was performed by a Unitarian Universalist choir in Buffalo, New York.[46] Vonnegut identified Unitarianism as the religion that many in his freethinking family turned to when freethought and other German "enthusiasms" became unpopular in the United States during the World Wars.[34] Vonnegut's parents were married by a Unitarian minister, and his son had at one time aspired to become a Unitarian minister.[33] The Unitarian Universalist Association's website includes Vonnegut in its list of famous UUs.[47] Dr. William Ellery Channing (April 7, 1780 – October 2, 1842) was the foremost Unitarian preacher in the United States in the early nineteenth century and, along with Andrews Norton, one of Unitarianisms leading theologians. ... Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), in full the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations in North America, is a liberal religious association of Unitarian Universalist congregations formed by the consolidation in 1961 of the American Unitarian Association and the Universalist Church of America. ...


Near the end of his life Vonnegut said that his epitaph ought to read: "The only proof he needed for the existence of God was music."[48]


Writing

In his book Bagombo Snuff Box: Uncollected Short Fiction, Vonnegut listed eight rules for writing a short story: This article is in need of attention. ...

  1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
  2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
  3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
  4. Every sentence must do one of two things—reveal character or advance the action.
  5. Start as close to the end as possible.
  6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them—in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
  7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
  8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To hell with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

Vonnegut qualifies the list by adding that Flannery O'Connor broke all these rules except the first, and that great writers tend to do that. Look up sadism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Mary Flannery OConnor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American novelist, short-story writer and essayist. ...


In Chapter 18 of his book Palm Sunday, "The Sexual Revolution", Vonnegut grades his own works. He states that the grades "do not place me in literary history" and that he is comparing "myself with myself." The grades are as follows:

The last lines that Vonnegut wrote, in his last book, go thus: The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ... This article is about the Kurt Vonnegut novel The Sirens of Titan. For other uses, see Siren (disambiguation). ... Mother Night is a novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut, first published in 1961. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... God Bless You, Mr. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Welcome to the Monkey House is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Happy Birthday, Wanda June is the 1971 film adaptation of the play by the same name by Kurt Vonnegut. ... For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ... Slapstick, or Lonesome No More! is a science fiction novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Jailbird is Kurt Vonneguts 1979 fictional novel about a man recently released from a low security prison. ... Palm Sunday is a 1981 collection of short stories, speeches, essays, letters, and other previously unpublished works by author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ...


When the last living thing
Has died on account of us,
How poetical it would be
If Earth could say,
In a voice floating up
Perhaps
From the floor
Of the Grand Canyon,
"It is done."
People did not like it here.'' This article is about the canyon in the southwestern United States. ...


Cameos

  • Vonnegut played himself in a cameo in 1986's Back to School, in which he is hired by Rodney Dangerfield's Thornton Melon to write a paper on the topic of the novels of Kurt Vonnegut. Recognizing the work as not Melon's own, Professor Turner tells him, "Whoever did write this doesn't know the first thing about Kurt Vonnegut."
  • Vonnegut also makes brief cameos in the film adaptations of his novels Mother Night and Breakfast of Champions. Mother Night was directed by Keith Gordon, who starred as Dangerfield's son in Back to School.
  • He made a guest appearance on the 2002 DVD released by 1 Giant Leap leading the producers of the film to say "probably the most unbelievable result in our whole production was getting Kurt Vonnegut to agree to an interview". In the film he states "music is, to me, proof of the existence of God. It is so extraordinarily full of magic and in tough times of my life I can listen to music and it makes such a difference"
  • Vonnegut narrates and wrote the narrative of two oratorios with composer Dave Soldier recorded by the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, "A Soldier's Story" based on the execution of Private Eddie Slovik and "Ice-9 Ballads", adapted from Cat's Cradle.
  • Vonnegut appears briefly in the 2005 dramatic documentary The American Ruling Class playing himself.
  • Vonnegut appears briefly in the 2005 Dutch release of the three part BBC documentary 'D-Day to Berlin. The allies journey to victory', telling about his memories of the bombing of Dresden
  • In 2007 Vonnegut is featured in the film Never Down as Robert and appears in several scenes.

A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Back-to-school, in clothing retailing, is a product season and is characterized by a display of items appropriate to a school wardrobe. ... Rodney Dangerfield (November 22, 1921 – October 5, 2004), born Jacob Cohen, was an American comedian and actor, best known for the catchphrase I dont get no respect and his monologues on that theme. ... Mother Night is a 1996 film based on the book by Kurt Vonnegut of the same name. ... Breakfast of Champions is a 1999 film adapted and directed by Alan Rudolph from the novel of the same name by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... Keith Gordon (born February 3, 1961 in New York City) is an American actor and film director. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... 1 Giant Leap is a concept band and media project consisting of the two principal artists, Jamie Catto (Faithless founding member) and Duncan Bridgeman. ... Dave Soldier (b. ... The Manhattan Chamber Orchestra is a chamber orchestra based in Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ...

In Pop culture

  • There was a widely-circulated rumour that Vonnegut gave a commencement speech at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997 in which he issued simple advice, most notably advising students to "wear sunscreen." In fact, the commencement speaker at MIT in 1997 was Kofi Annan; the text which circulated in Vonnegut's name, and which was later released as a spoken-word single by Baz Luhrmann, came from an article published in the Chicago Tribune on 1997 June 1 by columnist Mary Schmich. This confusion may have resulted from a statement Vonnegut made in 1999 in God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian:

    "I wish one and all long and happy lives, no matter what may become of them afterwards. Use sunscreen! Don’t smoke cigarettes. Cigars, however, are good for you.... Firearms are also good for you.... Gunpowder has zero fat and zero cholesterol. That goes for dumdums, too." A rumor (British English: rumour) is a piece of purportedly true information that is circulated without substantiating evidence. ... Kent Beck giving a commencement speech George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton speaking at the University of New Hampshire commencement. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Wear Sunscreen or Sunscreen Speech [1] are the common names of an essay actually called Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young written by Mary Schmich and published in the Chicago Tribune as a column in 1997. ... Kofi Atta Annan GCMG (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to January 1, 2007, serving two five-year terms. ... Baz Luhrmann (born Mark Anthony Luhrmann on September 17, 1962) is an Oscar and Golden Globe-nominated Australian film director, screenwriter, and producer. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mary Schmich is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune. ... Dumdum (Bengali দমদম) is a city and a municipality in North 24 Parganas district in the state of West Bengal, India. ...

  • In 1974, Venus on the Half-Shell, a book by Philip José Farmer in a style similar to that of Vonnegut and attributed to Kilgore Trout, was published. This action caused some confusion among readers. For some time many assumed that Vonnegut must have written it; when the truth of its authorship came out, Vonnegut was reported as being "not amused"; in an issue of the semi-prozine The Alien Critic/Science Fiction Review, published by Richard E. Geis, Farmer claimed to have received an angry, obscenity-laden telephone call from Vonnegut about it.
  • In 2001's film Bridget Jones's Diary, the fictitious book, "Kafka's Motorbike" is described as being "Vonnegut-esque."
  • There is a song by the Psychedelic Rock band Nebula titled "So It Goes." The entire song is an allusion to Slaughterhouse-Five.
  • There is a pop song by the band Ambrosia titled "Nice, Nice, Very Nice," that was inspired by, and directly references, concepts taken from Cat's Cradle.
  • At the end of the film Can't Hardly Wait, Preston states that he will be attending a work shop with Kurt Vonnegut.
  • On City and Colour's 2006 album Sometimes, track five is titled In the Water I Am Beautiful, a direct quote from the preface of Welcome to the Monkey House.
  • Vonnegut was paid tribute in the 1994 film The Stoned Age.
  • Rapper Kyle Lucas named his live hip-hop band Vonnegutt after Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Their first cd was titled The Vice-Nine Ep referring the chemical "Ice-Nine" from Vonnegut's book Cat's Cradle.
  • In the Criminal Minds episode Fear and Loathing Prentiss and Morgan turn out to be avid fans of Kurt Vonnegut and discuss Mother Night and Slaughterhouse-Five.
  • The novel Marienbad My Love by Mark Leach contains excerpts from a novel titled “Let Me Love You,” which Leach claims he attempted to write in the style of some of Vonnegut’s later works, most notably Timequake.[49]
  • On Modest Mouse's 2001 release Sad Sappy Sucker, track 14 is titled "Secret Agent X-9," a reference to Frank Hoenikker's high school nickname in Cat's Cradle.
  • In an episode on "Dead Like Me" the Lass family takes a vacation to a cabin, and in a flashback to when George is young and Reggie still a baby, "Cat's Cradle" is shown as a book left behind by other people. The book is shown again in a few instances in George's safekeep box during the episode.
  • In the Lost episode, The Constant, the character Desmond is said to have become "unstuck in time", similarly to the Slaughterhouse-Five protagonist, Billy Pilgrim. Additionally, in the episode Meet Kevin Johnson during the game show Michael is watching, Slaughterhouse-Five and Vonnegut are both named in one of the questions.
  • mewithoutYou has a song titled "Everything was Beautiful, and Nothing Hurt" on their album I Never Said I Was Brave
  • Crime In Stereo's song "Bicycles For Afghanistan" takes its name from a chapter title in Cat's Cradle.
  • Joe Satriani's 1987 album Surfing with the Alien contains an instrumental entitled "Ice 9".
Tribute to Vonnegut in the film The Stoned Age.
  • Kurt Vonnegut is the title of a song by Born Ruffians on the 2008 release Red, Yellow & Blue and features a verse from Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle:

    "Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly;
    Man got to sit and wonder why, why, why;
    Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land;
    Man got to tell himself he understand." Venus on the Half-Shell, first published in two parts begining in the December 1974 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, is a science fiction novel attributed to the fictional author Kilgore Trout but actually written by Philip José Farmer. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... Kilgore Trout is a fictional character created by author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Richard E. Geis is an American erotica and science fiction writer who won the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer in 1981 and 1982. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Nebula is a psychedelic stoner rock band, formed by Eddie Glass (guitar) and Ruben Romano after departing from Fu Manchu in 1997. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Ambrosia is a musical group formed in the Los Angeles area during the early 1970s. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... City and Colour is an acoustic side-project fronted by Dallas Green, rhythm guitarist and singer for the Canadian post-hardcore band Alexisonfire. ... Welcome to the Monkey House is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Criminal Minds is a crime drama that premiered on CBS on September 22, 2005. ... Mother Night is a novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut, first published in 1961. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Modest Mouse is an North-American indie rock band formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington by singer/lyricist/guitarist Isaac Brock, drummer Jeremiah Green, bassist Eric Judy, and guitarist Dann Gallucci. ... Sad Sappy Sucker (sometimes written as SadSappySucker) is the name of the 2001 album release by indie rock band Modest Mouse. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... Dead Like Me is an American television comedy-drama starring Ellen Muth and Mandy Patinkin as grim reapers in Seattle, Washington. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... LOST redirects here. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... -1... Crime In Stereo Crime In Stereo is a Long Island-based hardcore punk band. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... Joseph Satch Satriani (born July 15, 1956 in Westbury, New York, U.S.) is an American guitarist and former guitar instructor. ... Surfing with the Alien is the second album by instrumental rock solo artist Joe Satriani, released in 1987. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Born Ruffians are a Canadian indie rock band. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Adams Dark Matter Interview
  2. ^ a b c d Smith, Dinitia (2007-04-12). Kurt Vonnegut, Novelist Who Caught the Imagination of His Age, Is Dead at 84. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-04-12. In print: Smith, Dinitia, "Kurt Vonnegut, Novelist Who Caught the Imagination of His Age, Is Dead at 84", The New York Times, April 12, 2007, p.1
  3. ^ Kelly, Rin (April 18, 2007). 'Can I Go Home Now?'. The District Weekly. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  4. ^ Shortridge High School Collection. Shortridge High School. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  5. ^ http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/April07/vonnegut.html Novelist Kurt Vonnegut Dies
  6. ^ http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/April07/vonnegut.html Novelist Kurt Vonnegut Dies
  7. ^ Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA. Retrieved from Ancestry.com, 2008-01-28.
  8. ^ Reed, Peter (1999). "Volume 10, Issue No. 1 of the Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts". Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. 
  9. ^ NNDB - [check date] (battle of the Bulge started on Dec. 16)Biography of Kurt Vonnegut
  10. ^ a b c d Brinkley, Douglas (2006-08-24). Vonnegut's Apocalypse. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  11. ^ Sarah Land Prakken: The Reader's Adviser: A Layman's Guide to Literature, R. R. Bowker 1974, ISBN 0-83520781-1, p. 623; Arthur Salm: Novelist Kurt Vonnegut: So it goes, The San Diego Union-Tribune 15 April 2007
  12. ^ Vonnegut, Kurt (1997). Timequake.
  13. ^ Katz, Joe (April 13, 2007). Alumnus Vonnegut dead at 84. Chicago Maroon. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  14. ^ David Hayman, David Michaelis, George Plimpton, Richard Rhodes, "The Art of Fiction No. 64: Kurt Vonnegut", Paris Review, Issue 69, Spring 1977
  15. ^ 100 Best Novels: Slaughterhouse-Five (1969). Time Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  16. ^ 100 Best Novels. Modern Library (July 20, 1998). Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  17. ^ Levitas, Mitchel (August 19, 1968). A Slight Case of Candor. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  18. ^ And The Twain Shall Meet. University of Wisconsin-Madison (November 21, 1997). Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  19. ^ 25399 Vonnegut (1999 VN20). Jet Propulsion Labratory: California Institute of Technology. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  20. ^ I smoke, therefore I am. The Guardian Observer (February 5, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  21. ^ a b Feeney, Mark (2007-04-12). Counterculture author, icon Kurt Vonnegut Jr. dies at 84. The Boston Globe. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  22. ^ Lloyd, Christopher (April 12, 2007). Author Kurt Vonnegut dies at 84. Indianapolis Star. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  23. ^ Herman, Steve. Vonnegut's Hometown Honors Late Author. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  24. ^ Kurt Vonnegut Dead | The Onion - America's Finest News Source
  25. ^ Stableford, Brian (1993). "Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.", in John Clute & Peter Nicholls (eds.): The Encyclopedia Of Science Fiction, 2nd edition, Orbit, London, p. 1289. ISBN 1-85723-124-4. 
  26. ^ Kurt Vonnegut dies at 84: paper. Reuters (April 2, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  27. ^ NY1 Story April 12, 2007
  28. ^ Callahan, Rick. "Indianapolis honors literary native son", Delaware News-Journal (reprinting from the Associated Press), 14 January 2007. Retrieved on 2007-01-15. 
  29. ^ 15 Things Kurt Vonnegut Said Better Than Anyone Else Ever Has Or Will | The A.V. Club
  30. ^ Vonnegut, Kurt (May 10, 2004). Cold Turkey. In these Times. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  31. ^ Vonnegut, Kurt (October 29, 2004). The End is Near. In These Times. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  32. ^ Vonnegut, Mark (December 27, 2005). Twisting Vonnegut's views on terrorism. The Boston Globe. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  33. ^ a b c d e f Palm Sunday, by Kurt Vonnegut, 1981. Republished by The Dial Press, 2006.
  34. ^ a b c d Vonnegut Unbound: The master of irreverence on life, death, God, humanism, and the souls of aspiring artists, By Christopher R. Blazejewski, The Harvard Crimson, Friday, May 12, 2000
  35. ^ a b Vonnegut, Fates Worse Than Death, p. 157; Haught, 2000 Years of Disbelief, p. 287
  36. ^ a b Haught 1996, p. 287
  37. ^ "I say of Jesus, as all humanists do, 'If what he said is good, and so much of it is absolutely beautiful, what does it matter if he was God or not?' But if Christ hadn't delivered the Sermon on the Mount, with its message of mercy and pity, I wouldn't want to be a human being. I'd just as soon be a rattlesnake." Vonnegut, A Man without a Country, pp 80-81
  38. ^ a b Humanist President Kurt Vonnegut Mourned American Humanists Association Press Release, April 12, 2007
  39. ^ Vonnegut, Palm Sunday, p 196
  40. ^ Timequake, by Kurt Vonnegut, New York: G.P. Putnam's, 1997.
  41. ^ David Brancaccio: Now on PBS (transcript), 10.07.05
  42. ^ International Academy of Humanism, published on the website of the Council for Secular Humanism
  43. ^ Vonnegut, A Man without a Country (2005), p. 80
  44. ^ 2,000 Years of Disbelief: Famous People with the Courage to Doubt, by James A. Haught, Prometheus Books, 1996.
  45. ^ Unitarian Universalism is a religion that does not require its adherents to subscribe to any creed. It was formed in 1961 from a denominational merger of Unitarians and Universalists in the United States. Even after the merger, many individual congregations retained the pre-merger denominational designations ("Unitarian" or "Universalist") within their names. "Unitarian" is a common shorthand designation for members of the denomination, though "Unitarian Universalist" (abbreviated as UU) is the more technically correct term.
  46. ^ Vonnegut's mass had been written as a counterpoint to a "sadistic and masochistic" 1570 Catholic mass. It was translated into Latin and set to music by acquaintances. Fates Worse than Death, pp. 69-73, 223-234
  47. ^ Unitarian Universalism, UUA.org, March 1, 2007.
  48. ^ Vonnegut, A Man without a Country, p 66
  49. ^ [1]

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Reed may refer to: Peter Reed (rower), British World Championship and World Cup winning rower Peter Reed (criminal), Australian criminal convicted for his part in the Russell Street Bombing See also: Peter Reid, British football player and manager Peter Reid (triathlete), elite-level Canadian triathlete Category: ... “FAU” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... R.R. Bowker, LLC provides information support for the publishing industry in the United States. ... The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper published in San Diego, California by the Copley Press. ... Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Brian Stableford (born July 25, 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 50 novels. ... John [Frederick] Clute is a Canadian born author and critic who lives in Britain. ... Peter Nicholls may refer to: Peter Nicholls (writer) - critic and co-editor of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction Peter Nicholls (musician) - lead singer with the bands IQ and Niadems Ghost, also an album cover artist Different spelling Peter Nichols - author of A Day in the Death of Joe Egg... The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction is a reference work on science-fiction. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Unitarianism is the belief... This article is about Universalism in religion and theology. ...

Bibliography

Novels

For more about the automated musical instrument, see player piano Player Piano is a novel by Kurt Vonnegut, published in 1952, about a near-future society that is almost totally mechanized and automated, eliminating the middle class. ... This article is about the Kurt Vonnegut novel The Sirens of Titan. For other uses, see Siren (disambiguation). ... Mother Night is a novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut, first published in 1961. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... God Bless You, Mr. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ... Slapstick, or Lonesome No More! is a science fiction novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Jailbird is Kurt Vonneguts 1979 fictional novel about a man recently released from a low security prison. ... Deadeye Dick is a 1982 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... The novel Galápagos is Kurt Vonneguts look at evolution. ... For the fairy tale character, see Bluebeard. ... Hocus Pocus is a 1990 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ...

Collected Short Stories & Essays

Canary in a Cathouse is a collection of twelve short stories by Kurt Vonnegut published in 1961. ... Welcome to the Monkey House is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Wampeters, Foma & Granfalloons (Opinions) is a collection of essays, reviews, short travel accounts, and human interest stories written by Kurt Vonnegut from c. ... Palm Sunday is a 1981 collection of short stories, speeches, essays, letters, and other previously unpublished works by author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... Fates Worse than Death subtitled An Autobiographical Collage, is a 1990 collection of essays, speeches, and other previously uncollected writings by author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... Bagombo Snuff Box (ISBN 0399145052) is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut published in 1999. ... God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a collection of short interviews written by Vonnegut and first broadcast on NPR. The text of these interviews makes up the content of . ... A Man Without a Country is a collection of essays published in 2005 by the author Kurt Vonnegut. ...

External links

Find more about Kurt Vonnegut on Wikipedia's sister projects:
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Databases Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Reviews The Internet Book List (IBList) is an online database with information about books, authors, short stories, etc. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

  • Kurt Vonnegut's Unpublished Writings - The Village Voice reviews Vonnegut's Armageddon in Retrospect.
  • So It Goes: The Work Of Kurt Vonnegut The New York Times. Reviews of books by Vonnegut, and Vonnegut's reviews of other authors' books
  • Kurt Vonnegut on DVD: So it goes DVD Spin Doctor. Roundup of Vonnegut films on DVD posted after his death
  • Kurt Vonnegut's Unpublished Writings a review of the posthumously published volume Armageddon in Retrospect, and Other New and Unpublished Writings on War and Peace

Interviews

Fan sites and remembrances Wired for Books <http://wiredforbooks. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Arthur Buchwald (October 20, 1925 – January 17, 2007) was an American humorist best known for his long-running column that he wrote in The Washington Post, which in turn was carried as a syndicated column in many other newspapers. ... Paul Krassner (April 9, 1932) was the founder, editor and a frequent contributor to the freethought magazine The Realist, first published in 1958. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • The Vonnegut Web
  • Neil Gaiman, Orson Scott Card, David Brin and John Shirley Remember Kurt Vonnegut on MarsDust.com
  • When Kurt Vonnegut Met Sammy Davis, Jr. at 10 Zen Monkeys
  • Thanks Kurt Vonnegut by Ethan Bodnar
  • StarShipSofa audio podcast on life and works of Kurt Vonnegut Jr
  • Page 13 Missing subtitled: The End of an Era and the end of a Feud (a tribute to Vonnegut) by Attila Gyenis

Obituaries and memorials

  • The New York Times Obituary
  • The Economist Obituary
  • The Times (London) Obituary
  • "Thank You Mr. Vonnegut" Joel Bleifuss. In These Times
Persondata
NAME Vonnegut, Kurt, Jr.
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Novelist, Essayist
DATE OF BIRTH November 11, 1922(1922-11-11)
PLACE OF BIRTH Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
DATE OF DEATH April 11, 2007
PLACE OF DEATH Manhattan, New York, United States

The following is a complete list of literary works by the late author Kurt Vonnegut. ... The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ... This article is about the Kurt Vonnegut novel The Sirens of Titan. For other uses, see Siren (disambiguation). ... Mother Night is a novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut, first published in 1961. ... For the string game, see Cats cradle. ... God Bless You, Mr. ... Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Childrens Crusade: A Duty Dance With Death is a 1969 novel by best-selling author Kurt Vonnegut. ... For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ... Slapstick, or Lonesome No More! is a science fiction novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Jailbird is Kurt Vonneguts 1979 fictional novel about a man recently released from a low security prison. ... Deadeye Dick is a 1982 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... The novel Galápagos is Kurt Vonneguts look at evolution. ... For the fairy tale character, see Bluebeard. ... Hocus Pocus is a 1990 novel by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Timequake is a semi-autobiographical work by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Canary in a Cathouse is a collection of twelve short stories by Kurt Vonnegut published in 1961. ... Welcome to the Monkey House is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Bagombo Snuff Box (ISBN 0399145052) is an assortment of short stories written by Kurt Vonnegut published in 1999. ... Wampeters, Foma & Granfalloons (Opinions) is a collection of essays, reviews, short travel accounts, and human interest stories written by Kurt Vonnegut from c. ... Palm Sunday is a 1981 collection of short stories, speeches, essays, letters, and other previously unpublished works by author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... Fates Worse than Death subtitled An Autobiographical Collage, is a 1990 collection of essays, speeches, and other previously uncollected writings by author Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a collection of short interviews written by Vonnegut and first broadcast on NPR. The text of these interviews makes up the content of . ... A Man Without a Country is a collection of essays published in 2005 by the author Kurt Vonnegut. ... Happy Birthday, Wanda June is the 1971 film adaptation of the play by the same name by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Between Time and Timbuktu is a television adaptation of Kurt Vonneguts science fiction novels and stories, and the title of a book containing the script of the broadcast. ... Miss Temptation is a short story written by Kurt Vonnegut, published in the Saturday Evening Post in 1956. ... Histoire du soldat (sometimes written Lhistoire du soldat; translated as The Soldiers Tale or A Soldiers Tale) is a 1918 theatrical work to be read, played, and danced (lue, jouée et dansée) set to music by Igor Stravinsky. ... Happy Birthday, Wanda June is the 1971 film adaptation of the play by the same name by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Slaughterhouse-Five is a film adaptation of the Kurt Vonnegut novel of the same name. ... Next door, as defined by its proximity to 96_Maindy_Road ... Slapstick of Another Kind is a 1984 film based on the novel called Slapstick or Lonesome No More written by Kurt Vonnegut. ... This article is about the 1995 film. ... Mother Night is a 1996 film based on the book by Kurt Vonnegut of the same name. ... Breakfast of Champions is a 1999 film adapted and directed by Alan Rudolph from the novel of the same name by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... Displaced Person is the name of a 1985 Emmy award winning drama based on a short story by Kurt Vonnegut. ... Between Time and Timbuktu is a television adaptation of Kurt Vonneguts science fiction novels and stories, and the title of a book containing the script of the broadcast. ... Who Am I This Time?: Christopher Walken and Susan Sarandon as Vonneguts offbeat thespian couple. ... Next door, as defined by its proximity to 96_Maindy_Road ... This article is about the 1995 film. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kurt Vonnegut -- Vonnegut.com (3961 words)
Vonnegut also experimented with smaller etchings, whose subjects were often self portraits, usually profiles with bushy hair and drooping cigarette, roughly similar to the one that appears at the end of Breakfast of Champions.
As Vonnegut describes it, writing is labor, and the writer's reward arrives when he or she hands the manuscript to the editor and says, "It's yours.
Vonnegut enjoys the work of Paul Klee and Georges Braque, calling the latter "a special hero," and is intrigued by what the cubists did in "breaking up the chaotic into geometric forms, pleasing shapes" (Vonnegut 10/18/95).
Kurt Vonnegut - MSN Encarta (784 words)
Vonnegut insists that humans have no choice but to view modern civilization with a mixture of sadness and humor and that the cruelty of life must be countered with a genuine charity for human weakness.
Captured by German forces during the Battle of the Bulge that same year, Vonnegut was held prisoner in a slaughterhouse in the German city of Dresden.
Vonnegut announced his retirement from writing in 1994 but later reneged with the partly autobiographical Timequake (1997) and A Man Without A Country (2005), a collection of articles first published mainly in the alternative magazine In These Times, where Vonnegut is a senior editor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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