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Encyclopedia > Kuomintang
Kuomintang of China
中國國民黨
中国国民党
Chairman Wu Po-hsiung
Founded 1919-10-10 (modern)
1894-11-24 (as Revive China Society)
Headquarters 232-234 Bade Rd., Sec. 2
Zhongshan District, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China
Official newspaper Central Daily News
Membership (2006) 1,089,000
Official ideology/
political position
Three Principles of the People,
Conservatism,
Anti-communism,
Centre-right,
Chinese nationalism,
Chinese reunification.
International affiliation International Democrat Union
Official colour(s) Blue
Website www.kmt.org.tw
Kuomintang
Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨
Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党

The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China (ROC), now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in terms of seats in the Legislative Yuan, and the oldest political party in the Republic of China. The KMT is a member of the International Democrat Union. Image File history File links White_sun,_blue_sky. ... Wu Po-hsiung Wu Po-hsiung (Traditional Chinese: ; born June 19, 1939), a Taiwanese politician, is currently chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hsing-chung Hui flag was designed by Lu Hao-tung and is currently the KMT flag. ... The Zhongshan District (中山區 Wade-Giles: Chung-shan, Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongshan) of Taipei City has many recreational areas which include Rongxing Garden, Xinsheng Park, Zhongshan Fine Arts Park, the Dajia Riverside Park, and the Taipei Municipal Childrens Recreation Area. ... Alternative meaning: Taipei County City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sun Yat-sen, who developed the Three Principles of the People. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Ideologies Communist internationals Prominent communists Related subjects Anti-communism refers to opposition to communism. ... The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organizations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding far right stances. ... The May Fourth Movement in 1919 marked a turning point in the history of Chinese nationalism. ... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ... The International Democrat Union (IDU) is an international grouping of conservative, nationalist, classical liberal, anti-Communist and some Christian democratic political parties. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Simplified Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: or ; traditional Chinese: or ; pinyin: or ) is one of two standard sets of Chinese characters of the contemporary Chinese written language. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Min (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; POJ: Bân hong-giân; BUC: Mìng huŏng-ngiòng) is a general term for a group of dialects of the Chinese language spoken in the southeastern Chinese province of Fujian as well as by migrants from this province in Guangdong (around Chaozhou-Swatou... Mǐn N n (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name B ; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... Jyutping (sometimes spelled Jyutpin) is a romanization system for Standard Cantonese developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) in 1993. ... Political Parties redirects here. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... The International Democrat Union (IDU) is an international grouping of conservative, nationalist, classical liberal, anti-Communist and some Christian democratic political parties. ...


Together with the People First Party and Chinese New Party, the KMT forms what is known as the Taiwanese Pan-Blue coalition, which support eventual reunification with the mainland. However, the KMT has been forced to moderate their stance by advocating political and legal status quo of modern Taiwan. The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: QÄ«nmíndÇŽng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ... Taiwan Strait area The controversy regarding the political status of Taiwan hinges on whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of... This article is about the English rock band. ...


The KMT originated in China in 1912 , founded by Song Jiaoren and Sun Yat-sen shortly after the Xinhai Revolution. Later led by Chiang Kai-shek, it ruled much of China from 1928 until its retreat to Taiwan in 1949 after defeat by the Communist Party of China (CPC). There, the KMT controlled the government under a single party state until reforms in the late 1970s through the 1990s loosened its grip on power. The ROC was once referred to synonymously with the KMT and known simply as "Nationalist China" after its ruling party. Sung Chiao-jen (Chinese characters: 宋教仁, Pinyin: Sòng Jiàorén) (1882–March 22, 1913) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader. ... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... Combatants  Qing Dynasty Chinese Revolutionary Alliance Commanders Feng Guozhang, Yuan Shikai, and local Qing governors. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China, a position guaranteed by the countrys constitution. ... A single-party state or one-party system or single-party system is a type of party system and form of government where only a single political party dominates the government and no opposition parties are allowed. ... Nationalist China was an informal phrase to describe the Republic of China government in Taiwan during the Cold War. ... The ruling party in a parliamentary system is the party or coalition of the majority in parliament. ...

Contents

Support

The flag of the Kuomintang consists of a twelve ray sun (originating from the twelve traditional Chinese hours of the day) to symbolize the spirit of progress. The flag forms the canton of the flag of the Republic of China.
The flag of the Kuomintang consists of a twelve ray sun (originating from the twelve traditional Chinese hours of the day) to symbolize the spirit of progress. The flag forms the canton of the flag of the Republic of China.

Support for the Kuomintang on the Republic of China encompasses a wide range of groups. Kuomintang support tends to be higher in northern Taiwan and in urban areas, where it draws its backing from small to medium and self-employed business owners, who make up the majority of commercial interests in Taiwan. Big businesses are also likely to support the KMT because of its policy of maintaining commercial links with mainland China. The KMT also has strong support in the labor sector because of the many labor benefits and insurance implemented while the KMT was in power. The KMT traditionally has strong cooperation with labor unions, teachers, and government workers. Among the ethnic groups in Taiwan, the KMT has solid support among mainlanders and their descendants for ideological reasons and among Taiwanese aboriginals. Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The Blue Sky with a White Sun flag is the Kuomintang party flag. ... Flag of Taiwan redirects here. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... For university teachers, see professor. ... Mainlander is still an incorrect usage or misnomer promoted by mostly KMT Chinese and older folks in Taiwan because it still implied Taiwan as a providence to China even though Taiwan is never a territory claim of ROC charter. ... A Rukai villege Chief visiting Department of Anthropology in Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule. ...


Opponents of the KMT include strong supporters of Taiwan independence, people of Hoklo (Hokkien) background, and rural residents, though supporters of unification include Hoklo and supporters of independence include mainlanders.[citation needed] There is opposition due to an image of KMT both as a mainlanders' and a Chinese nationalist party out of touch with local values. In addition, many oppose the KMT on the basis of its authoritarian past, large amount of party assets, alleged corruption, and patronage networks.[citation needed] Taiwan independence (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p Å«n-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the... Hoklo (pronounced Holo; Chinese ; Mandarin pronunciation--pinyin: Fulao) can refer to an ethnic-cultural group originating in Fujian province, China. ...


History

Early years

The Kuomintang was founded in Guangdong Province on August 25, 1912 from a collection of several revolutionary groups that had successfully overthrown the Qing Dynasty in the Xinhai Revolution, including the Revolutionary Alliance, as a moderate democratic socialist party. Thus, the party traces its roots to the Revive China Society, which was founded in 1895 and merged with several other anti-monarchist societies as the Revolutionary Alliance in 1905. Not to be confused with the former Kwantung Leased Territory in north-eastern China. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... Combatants  Qing Dynasty Chinese Revolutionary Alliance Commanders Feng Guozhang, Yuan Shikai, and local Qing governors. ... The Tongmenghui (同盟會 Pinyin: Tóng Méng Huì, literal meaning: United Allegiance Society), also known as the United League or the Revolutionary Alliance, was organized by Sun Yat-sen and Sung Chiao-jen in Tokyo, Japan on August 20, 1905. ... Democratic socialism is a political movement propagating the ideals of socialism within the framework of a parliamentary democracy. ... The Hsing-chung Hui flag was designed by Lu Hao-tung and is currently the KMT flag. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ...

Sun Yat-sen [middle] and Chiang Kai-shek [on stage in uniform] at the founding of the Whampoa Military Academy in 1924.

Sun Yat-sen, who had just stepped down as provisional president of the Republic of China, was chosen as its overall leader under the title of premier (總理), and Huang Xing was chosen as Sun's deputy. However, the most influential member of the party was the third ranking Song Jiaoren, who mobilized mass support from gentry and merchants for the KMT in winning the 1912 National Assembly election, on a platform of promoting constitutional parliamentary democracy. Though the party had an overwhelming majority in the first National Assembly, President Yuan Shikai started ignoring the parliamentary body in making presidential decisions, counter to the Constitution, and assassinated its parliamentary leader Song Jiaoren in Shanghai in 1913. Members of the KMT led by Sun Yat-sen staged the Second Revolution in July 1913, a poorly planned and ill-supported armed rising to overthrow Yuan, and failed. Yuan dissolved the KMT in November (whose members had largely fled into exile in Japan) and dismissed the parliament early in 1914. Yuan Shikai proclaimed himself emperor in December 1915. Image File history File links Sunys. ... Image File history File links Sunys. ... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... The Chinese Military Academy emblem includes its motto, which was first proclaimed by Sun Yat-sen at the Whampoa Academys opening in 1924. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Huang Hsing Huang Hsing or Huáng Xīng (S. Chinese: 黄兴, T. Chinese: 黃興; October 25, 1874 – October 31, 1916), Chinese revolutionary leader, militarist and statesman, was the first arm commander-in-chief of Republic of China. ... Sung Chiao-jen (Chinese characters: 宋教仁, Pinyin: Sòng Jiàorén) (1882–March 22, 1913) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader. ... The National Assembly (Traditional Chinese: 國民大會; Simplified Chinese: 国民大会; Pinyin: ) refers to several parliamentary bodies that existed in the history of the Republic of China. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Yuan Shikai (Courtesy Weiting 慰亭; Pseudonym: Rongan 容庵 Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: Yuán ShìkÇŽi; Wade-Giles: Yüan Shih-kai) (September 16, 1859[1] – June 6, 1916) was a Chinese military official and politician during the late Qing Dynasty and the early Republic of China. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below (History of China - BC) is being considered for deletion. ... Yuan Shikai (Courtesy Weiting 慰亭; Pseudonym: Rongan 容庵 Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: Yuán ShìkÇŽi; Wade-Giles: Yüan Shih-kai) (September 16, 1859[1] – June 6, 1916) was a Chinese military official and politician during the late Qing Dynasty and the early Republic of China. ...

Chiang Kai-shek , who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925
Chiang Kai-shek , who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925

While exiled in Japan in 1914 , Sun established the Chinese Revolutionary Party, but many of his old revolutionary comrades, including Huang Xing, Wang Jingwei, Hu Hanmin and Chen Jiongming, refused to join him or support his efforts in inciting armed uprising against Yuan Shikai. In order to join the Chinese Revolutionary Party, members must take an oath of personal loyalty to Sun, which many old revolutionaries regarded as undemocratic and contrary to the spirit of the revolution. Thus, many old revolutionaries did not join Sun's new organization, and he was largely sidelined within the Republican movement during this period. Sun returned to China in 1917 to establish a rival government at Guangzhou, but was soon forced out of office and exiled to Shanghai. There, with renewed support, he resurrected the KMT on October 10, 1919, but under the name of the Chinese Kuomintang, as the old party had simply been called the Kuomintang. In 1920, Sun and the KMT were restored in Guangdong. In 1923 , the KMT and its government accepted aid from the Soviet Union after being denied recognition by the western powers. Soviet advisers – the most prominent of whom was Mikhail Borodin, an agent of the Comintern – began to arrive in China in 1923 to aid in the reorganization and consolidation of the KMT along the lines of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, establishing a Leninist party structure that lasted into the 1990s. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) was under Comintern instructions to cooperate with the KMT, and its members were encouraged to join while maintaining their separate party identities, forming the First United Front between the two parties. Chiang Kai-Shek from http://www. ... Chiang Kai-Shek from http://www. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chinese Revolutionary Party (Traditional Chinese: 中華革命黨; pinyin: Zhōnghúa GémìngdÇŽng) was the short lived renaming of the Kuomintang between 1914 and 1919. ... Huang Hsing Huang Hsing or Huáng Xīng (S. Chinese: 黄兴, T. Chinese: 黃興; October 25, 1874 – October 31, 1916), Chinese revolutionary leader, militarist and statesman, was the first arm commander-in-chief of Republic of China. ... Wang Jingwei * Courtesy name: Jixin (季新) * Alternate name: Zhaoming (兆銘). Wang Jingwei (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wang Ching-wei) (May 4, 1883 – November 10, 1944), was a Chinese politician. ... Hu Hanmin (Chinese:胡漢民(trad. ... Chen Jiongming (陳炯明, 1878-1933) was a revolutionary figure in the early periods of the republic of China. ... Yuan Shikai (Courtesy Weiting 慰亭; Pseudonym: Rongan 容庵 Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: Yuán ShìkÇŽi; Wade-Giles: Yüan Shih-kai) (September 16, 1859[1] – June 6, 1916) was a Chinese military official and politician during the late Qing Dynasty and the early Republic of China. ... Guangzhou is the capital and the sub-provincial city of Guangdong Province in the southern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Mikhail Markovich Borodin (Михаи́л Бороди́н) (July 9, 1884, - May 29, 1951) was the alias of Mikhail Gruzenberg. ... The Comintern (Russian: Коммунистический Интернационал, Kommunisticheskiy Internatsional – Communist International, also known as the Third International) was an international Communist organization founded in March 1919, in the midst of the war communism period (1918-1921), by Vladimir Lenin and the Russian Communist Party (Bolshevik), which intended to fight by all available means, including... The Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Russian: Коммунисти́ческая Па́ртия Сове́тского Сою́за, transliterated Kommunisticheskaya Partiya Sovetskogo Soyuza, acronym: КПСС (KPSS)) was the ruling political party in the Soviet Union. ... Vladimir Lenin in 1920 Leninism refers to various related political and economic theories elaborated by Bolshevik revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin, and by other theorists who claim to be carrying on Lenins work. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Soviet advisers also helped the Nationalists set up a political institute to train propagandists in mass mobilization techniques, and in 1923 Chiang Kai-shek, one of Sun's lieutenants from the Tongmenghui days, was sent to Moscow for several months' military and political study. At the first party congress in 1924 , which included non-KMT delegates such as members of the CCP, they adopted Sun's political theory, which included the Three Principles of the People - nationalism, democracy, and people's livelihood. Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... The Tongmenghui (Chinese: 同盟會; Pinyin: Tóngménghuì; Wade-Giles: Tung-meng Hui; ), also known as the United League or the Revolutionary Alliance, was a secret society and underground resistance movement organized by Sun Yat-sen and Song Jiaoren in Tokyo, Japan, on 20 August 1905. ... Sun Yat-sen, who developed the Three Principles of the People. ...


War

Nationalist soldiers during the Second Sino-Japanese War.
Nationalist soldiers during the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Following the death of Sun Yat-sen, General Chiang Kai-shek emerged as the KMT leader and launched the Northern Expedition in 1926 to defeat the northern warlords and unite China under the party. He halted briefly in Shanghai in 1927 to purge the Communists who had been allied with the KMT, which sparked the Chinese Civil War. When Kuomintang forces took Beijing, as the city was the de jure internationally recognized capital, though previously controlled by the feuding warlords, this event allowed the Kuomintang to receive widespread diplomatic recognition in the same year. The capital was moved from Beijing to Nanjing, the original capital of the Ming Dynasty, and thus a symbolic purge of the final Qing elements. This period of KMT rule in China between 1927 and 1937 became known as the Nanjing decade. Image File history File links Kmtarmy. ... Image File history File links Kmtarmy. ... The National Revolutionary Army (NRA) (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: , sometimes shortened to 國軍 or National Army) was the party army of the Kuomintang (KMT) from 1925 until 1947, as well as the national army of the Republic of China during the KMTs period of party rule beginning in 1928. ... Combatants China  United States1 Soviet Union2  Empire of Japan Collaborationist Chinese Army3 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Claire Chennault, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime Sugiyama, Shunroku Hata... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The warlord era represents the period in the history of the Republic of China from 1916 to 1928 when the country was divided by various military cliques. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... 412 Incident was a large-scale purge to Communists in the Chinese Nationalist Party in Shanghai, which was ordered by Chiang Kai-shek, occured on 12 April 1927 during the Northern Expedition. ... Combatants Kuomintang of China Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 4,300,000 (July 1946) 3,650,000 (June 1948) 1,490,000 (June 1949) 1,200,000 (July 1946) 2,800,000 (June 1948) 4,000,000 (June 1949) The Chinese Civil War (traditional... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Ming. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


In sum, the KMT began as a heterogeneous group advocating American-inspired federalism and provincial independence. However, after its reorganization along Soviet lines, the party aimed to establish a centralized one party state with one ideology - Three Principles of the People. This was even more evident following Sun's elevation into a cult figure after his death. The control by one single party began the period of "political tutelage," whereby the party was to control the government while instructing the people on how to participate in a democratic system. After several military campaigns and with the help of German military advisors (German planned fifth "extermination campaign"), the Communists were forced to withdraw from their bases in southern and central China into the mountains in a massive military retreat known famously as the Long March, an undertaking which would eventually increase their reputation among the peasants. Out of the 86,000 Communist soldiers that broke out of the pocket, only 20,000 would make the 10,000km march to Shaanxi province. The Kuomintang continued to attack the Communists. This was in line with Chiang's policy of solving internal conflicts (warlords and communists) before fighting external invasions (Japan). However, Zhang Xueliang, who believed that the Japanese invasion constituted the greater prevailing threat, took Chiang hostage during the Xi'an Incident in 1937 and forced Chiang to agree to an alliance with the Communists in the total war against the Japanese. The Second Sino-Japanese War had officially started, and would last until the Japanese surrender in 1945. However in many situations the alliance was in name only; after a brief period of cooperation, the armies began to fight the Japanese separately, rather than as coordinated allies. Conflicts between KMT and communists were still common during the war, and documented claims of Communist attacks upon the KMT forces, and vice versa, abound. A single-party state or one-party system or single-party system is a type of party system and form of government where only a single political party dominates the government and no opposition parties are allowed. ... Sun Yat-sen, who developed the Three Principles of the People. ... Combatants Nationalist Party of China and allied warlords Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek various, eventually Mao Zedong Strength over 300,000 First Front Red Army: 86,000 (October 1934) 7,000 (October 1935) The Long March (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) was a massive military retreat undertaken... Zhang Xueliang Zhang Xueliang or Chang Hsüeh-liang (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chang Hsüeh-liang; English occasionally: Peter Hsueh Liang Chang) (3 June 1901 (according to other accounts in 1898 or 1900) in Haicheng County, Fengtian province of China – 14 October 2001 in Hawaii, United States... Chiang Kai-shek and Zhang Xueliang around the time of the Xian Incident. ... Combatants China  United States1 Soviet Union2  Empire of Japan Collaborationist Chinese Army3 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Claire Chennault, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime Sugiyama, Shunroku Hata...


In these incidents, it should be noted that The KMT armies typically utilized more traditional tactics while the Communists chose guerilla tactics, leading to KMT claims that the Communists often refused to support the KMT troops, choosing to withdraw and let the KMT troops take the brunt of Japanese attacks. These same guerilla tactics, honed against the Japanese forces, were used to great sucecss later during open civil war, as well as the Allied forces in the Korean War and the U.S. forces in the Vietnam War.


Full-scale civil war between the Communists and KMT resumed after the defeat of Japan. The Communist armies, previously a minor faction, grew rapidly in influence and power due to several errors on the KMT's part: first, the KMT reduced troop levels precipitously after the Japanese surrender, leaving large numbers of able-bodied, trained fighting men who became unemployed and disgruntled with the KMT as prime recruits for the Communists. Second, the KMT government proved thoroughly unable to manage the economy, allowing hyperinflation to result. Among the most despised and ineffective efforts it undertook to contain inflation was the conversion to the gold standard for the national treasury and the Gold Standard Script (金圓券) in August 1948, outlawing private ownership of gold, silver, and foreign exchangem, collecting all such precious metals and foreign exchange from the people and issuing the Gold Standard Script in exchange. The new script became worthless in only ten months and greatly reinforced the nationwide perception of KMT as a corrupt or at best inept entity. Third, Chiang Kai-shek ordered his forces to defend the urbanized cities. This decision gave the Communists a chance to move freely through the countryside. At first, the KMT had the edge with the aid of weapons and ammunition from the United States. However, with hyperinflation and other economic ills, widespread corruption, the KMT continued to lose popular support. At the same time, the suspension of American aid and tens of thousands of deserted or decommissioned soldiers being recruited to the Communist cause tipped the balance of power quickly to the Communist side, and the overwhelming popular support for the Communists in most of the country made it all but impossible for the KMT forces to carry out successful assaults against the Communists. By the end of 1949, the Communists controlled almost all of mainland China, as the KMT retreated to Taiwan with a significant amount of China's national treasures and 2 million people, including military forces and refugees. Some party members stayed in the mainland and broke away from the main KMT to found the Revolutionary Committee of the Kuomintang, which still currently exists as one of the eight minor registered parties in the People's Republic of China. Certain figures in this article use scientific notation for readability. ... ... The Revolutionary Committee of the Chinese Kuomintang (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨革命委員會Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党革命委员会 Pinyin: Zhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng GémìngwÄ›iyuánhuì) is one of eight registered minor political parties (in addition to the Communist Party of China) in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is formally a multi-party state under the leadership of the Communist Party of China in the popular front model similar to the former Communist-era Eastern European countries such as the National Front of Democratic Germany . ...


KMT in Taiwan

The former KMT headquarters in Taipei City; the imposing structure directly faced the Presidential Building, was seen as a symbol of the party's wealth and dominance.
The former KMT headquarters in Taipei City; the imposing structure directly faced the Presidential Building, was seen as a symbol of the party's wealth and dominance.

In 1895 , Taiwan, including the Pescadores, became a Japanese colony, a concession by the Qing Empire after it lost the First Sino-Japanese War. After Japan's defeat at the end of World War II in 1945, Allied Command ordered Japan, who surrendered to the US, to surrender its troops in Taiwan to the forces of the Republic of China Kuomintang. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2087x1334, 265 KB) Summary Taken by User:Jiang on 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2087x1334, 265 KB) Summary Taken by User:Jiang on 2005. ... Alternative meaning: Taipei County City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... Taiwan Governor-Generals Office in 1937 during Japanese rule. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... Combatants  Qing Dynasty (China)  Empire of Japan Commanders Li Hongzhang Yamagata Aritomo Strength 630,000 men Beiyang Army  Beiyang Fleet 240,000 men Imperial Japanese Army  Imperial Japanese Navy Casualties 35,000 dead or wounded 13,823 dead, 3,973 wounded The First Sino-Japanese War (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Taiwan was placed under the administrative control of the Republic of China by the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), and the ROC put Taiwan under military occupation. Tensions between the local Taiwanese and mainlanders from mainland China increased in the intervening years culminating in a flashpoint on February 27, 1947 in Taipei when a dispute between a female cigarette vendor and an anti-smuggling officer triggered civil disorder and protests that would last for days. The uprising turned bloody and was shortly put down by the ROC Army in the 228 Incident. The United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) was founded in 1943 to provide relief to areas liberated from Axis powers. ... Mainlander is still an incorrect usage or misnomer promoted by mostly KMT Chinese and older folks in Taiwan because it still implied Taiwan as a providence to China even though Taiwan is never a territory claim of ROC charter. ... ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ... The Republic of China (commonly known as Taiwan) maintains a large military establishment, which accounted for 16. ... The 228 Monument located near the Presidential Office in Taipei The 228 Incident (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Peh-ōe-jÄ«: JÄ«-jÄ«-pat sÅ«-kiāⁿ) also known as the 228 Massacre (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) was an uprising in Taiwan that began on February 28, 1947 and was suppressed by the...


Following the establishment of the People's Republic of China (PRC) on October 1, 1949, the commanders of the PRC People's Liberation Army believed that Kinmen and Matsu had to be taken before a final assault on Taiwan. KMT fought the Battle of Kuningtou and stopped the invasion. In 1950 Chiang took office in Taipei under the Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of Communist Rebellion. The provision declared martial law in Taiwan and halted some democratic processes, including presidential and parliamentary elections, until the mainland could be recovered from the Communists. KMT estimated it would take 3 years to defeat the Communists. The slogan was "prepare in the first year, start fighting in the second, and conquer in the third year." However, various factors, including international pressure, are believed to have prevented the KMT from militarily engaging the Communists full-scale. A cold war with a couple of minor military conflicts was resulted in the early years. The various government bodies previously in Nanjing were re-established in Taipei as the KMT-controlled government actively claimed sovereignty over all China. The Republic of China in Taiwan retained China's seat in the United Nations until 1971 . PRC is a common abbreviation for: Peoples Republic of China Palestinian Red Crescent Popular Resistance Committees This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Kinmen (Traditional Chinese: 金門; Hanyu Pinyin: JÄ«nmén; Tongyong Pinyin: Jinmén; Wade-Giles: Chin-men; POJ: Kim-mnÌ‚g; also romanized Quemoy from Southern Min (in early Spanish romanization); literally Golden Door or Golden Gate), located at 24. ... Matsu can refer to: Matsu, a significant sea goddess in Chinese culture. ... Combatants Republic of China, National Revolutionary Army Peoples Republic of China, Peoples Liberation Army Commanders Tang Enbo Ye Fei Strength Roughly 40,000 garrisoned troops from the ROC 18th Army, air support from ROC Air Force, maritime support from ROC Navy. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ... The Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of Communist Rebellion (Chinese: 動員戡亂時期臨時條款; Hanyu Pinyin: ) was a series of temporary constitutional provisions passed by the National Assembly of the Republic of China on May 10, 1948 and gave President Chiang Kai-Shek extended powers amid the height of the Chinese Civil War... For other uses, see Martial law (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nanjing (disambiguation). ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Chinas seat in the United Nations has been occupied by the Peoples Republic of China since October 25, 1971. ...


Until the 1970s, KMT successfully pushed ahead with land reforms, developed the economy, implemented a democratic system in a lower level of the government, improved cross-Taiwan Strait relations, and created the admirable Taiwan economic miracle. However KMT controlled the government under a one-party authoritarian state until reforms in the late 1970s through the 1990s. As a result of the 228 Incident in 1947 , Taiwanese people had to endure what is called the "White Terror", a KMT-led political repression. The ROC in Taiwan was once referred to synonymously with the KMT and known simply as "Nationalist China" after its ruling party. In the 1970s, the KMT began to allow for "supplemental elections" in Taiwan to fill the seats of the aging representatives in parliament. Although opposition parties were not permitted, Tangwai (or, "outside the party") representatives were tolerated. In the 1980s, the KMT focused on transforming the government from a single-party system to a multi-party democracy one and embracing "Taiwanizing". With the founding of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) in 1986 , the KMT started competing against the DPP in Parliamentary elections. In 1991, martial law ceased when President Lee Teng-Hui terminated the Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of Communist Rebellion. All parties started to be allowed to compete at all levels of elections, including the presidential election. Lee Teng-hui, the ROC's first democratically elected President and the leader of the KMT during the 1990s, announced his advocacy of "special state-to-state relations" with the PRC. The PRC associated it with Taiwan independence. ... The 228 Monument located near the Presidential Office in Taipei The 228 Incident (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Peh-ōe-jÄ«: JÄ«-jÄ«-pat sÅ«-kiāⁿ) also known as the 228 Massacre (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) was an uprising in Taiwan that began on February 28, 1947 and was suppressed by the... It has been suggested that The White Terror (France) be merged into this article or section. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... A multi-party system is a type of party system. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; abbreviated to or ; Hanyu Pinyin: MínjìndÇŽng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Martial law (disambiguation). ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician of Taiwan. ... The Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of Communist Rebellion (Chinese: 動員戡亂時期臨時條款; Hanyu Pinyin: ) was a series of temporary constitutional provisions passed by the National Assembly of the Republic of China on May 10, 1948 and gave President Chiang Kai-Shek extended powers amid the height of the Chinese Civil War... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician of Taiwan. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Taiwan independence (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p Å«n-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the...


The KMT faced a split in 1994 that led to the formation of the Chinese New Party, alleged to be a result of Lee's "corruptive ruling style". The New Party has, since the purging of Lee, largely reintegrated into KMT. A much more serious split in the party occurred as a result of the 2000 Presidential election. Upset at the choice of Lien Chan as the party's presidential nominee, former party Secretary-General James Soong launched an independent bid, which resulted in the expulsion of Soong and his supporters and the formation of the People's First Party (PFP). The KMT candidate placed third behind Soong in the elections. After the election, Lee's strong relationship with the opponent became apparent. In order to prevent defections to the PFP, Lien moved the party away from Lee's pro-independence policies and became more favorable toward Chinese reunification. This shift led to Lee's expulsion from the party and the formation of the Taiwan Solidarity Union. The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Election for the 10th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (第十任中華民國總統、副總統選舉), the second ever direct elections for President and Vice President of the Republic of China on Taiwan and the 10th... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... James Chu-yu Soong (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ...


Current issues and challenges

Lien Chan [middle] and Wu Po-hsiung [second left] and the Kuomintang touring the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum in Nanjing, the People's Republic of China. The Pan-Blue coalition visited the mainland in 2005.
Lien Chan [middle] and Wu Po-hsiung [second left] and the Kuomintang touring the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum in Nanjing, the People's Republic of China. The Pan-Blue coalition visited the mainland in 2005.

As the ruling party on Taiwan, the KMT amassed a vast business empire of banks, investment companies, petrochemical firms, and television and radio stations, thought to have made it the world's richest political party, with assets once estimated to be around US$ 2.0-10 billion [2]. Although this war chest appeared to help the KMT throughout until the mid-1990s, which led to accusations of corruption (see Black gold (politics)). After 2000 , the KMT's financial holdings appeared to be far more of a liability than an asset. After 2000, the KMT started to divest its assets. However the transactions were not disclosed and where the money earned from selling assets has gone (if it has gone anywhere) is unknown. There were accusations in the 2004 presidential election that the KMT retained assets that were illegally acquired. Currently, there is a law proposed by the DPP in the Legislative Yuan to recover illegally acquired party assets and return them to the government; however, since the pan-Blue alliance, the KMT and its smaller partner PFP, control the legislature, it is very unlikely to be passed. The KMT also acknowledged that part of its assets were acquired through extra-legal means and thus promised to "retro-endow" them to the government. However, the quantity of the assets which should be classified as illegal are still under heated debate; DPP, the current ruling party, claimed that there is much more that the KMT has yet to acknowledge. Also, the KMT actively sold assets under its title in order to quench its recent financial difficulties, which the DPP argues is illegal. Former KMT Chairman Ma Ying-Jeou's position is that the KMT will sell some of its properties at below market rates rather than return them to the government and that the details of these transactions will not be publicly disclosed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 779 KB) Summary Originally uploaded to the Chinese Wikipedia by Universe729 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kuomintang Lien Chan 2005 Pan-Blue visits to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 779 KB) Summary Originally uploaded to the Chinese Wikipedia by Universe729 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kuomintang Lien Chan 2005 Pan-Blue visits to... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... Wu Po-hsiung Wu Po-hsiung (Traditional Chinese: ; born June 19, 1939), a Taiwanese politician, is currently chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT). ... Mausoleum of Dr. Sun Yat-Sen The Entrance Gate Gate Ceiling of the sacrificial hall, displaying the flag of Kuomintang Marble coffin The Mausoleum of Dr. Sun Yat-Sen (中山陵) is situated at the foot of the second peak of Mount Zijin (Purple Mountain 紫金山) in Nanjing, China. ... For other uses, see Nanjing (disambiguation). ... Lien Chan and the Kuomintang touring the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum in Nanjing, China. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Black gold (Chinese: 黑金; pinyin: hēi jīn) is a term used in the Republic of China (Taiwan) to refer to political corruption. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; abbreviated to or ; Hanyu Pinyin: Mínjìndǎng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT...


In December 2003 , however, then-KMT chairman (present chairman emeritus) and presidential candidate, Lien Chan, initiated what appeared to some to be a major shift in the party's position on the linked questions of Chinese reunification and Taiwan independence. Speaking to foreign journalists, Lien said that while the KMT was opposed to "immediate independence," it did not wish to be classed as "pro-reunificationist" either. Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ...


At the same time, Wang Jin-pyng, speaker of the Legislative Yuan and the Pan-Blue Coalition's campaign manager in the 2004 presidential election, said that the party no longer opposed Taiwan's "eventual independence." This statement was later clarified as meaning that the KMT opposes any immediate decision on unification and independence and would like to have this issue resolved by future generations. The KMT's position on the cross-strait relationship was redefined as hoping to remain in the current neither-independent-nor-united situation. Wang Jin-pyng (Chinese: 王金平, pinyin: Wáng Jīnpíng) (born March 17, 1941), Taiwanese politician, is the President of the Legislative Yuan. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ...

Ma Ying-jeou, former chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT), 2005 – 2007.
Ma Ying-jeou, former chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT), 20052007.

In 2005, then-party chairman Lien Chan announced that he was to leave his office. The two leading contenders for the position include Ma Ying-jeou and Wang Jin-pyng. On April 5, 2005, Taipei Mayor Ma Ying-jeou said he wishes to lead the opposition Kuomintang with Wang Jin-pyng. On 16 July 2005, Ma was elected as KMT chairman in the first contested leadership in Kuomintang's 93-year history. Some 54 percent of the party's 1.04 million members cast their ballots. Ma Ying-jeou garnered 72.4 percent of vote share, or 375,056 votes, against Wang Jin-pyng's 27.6 percent, or 143,268 votes. After failing to convince Wang to stay on as a vice chairman, Ma named holdovers Wu Po-hsiung (吳伯雄), Chiang Pin-kung (江丙坤), and Lin Cheng-chi (林澄枝), as well as long-time party administrator and strategist John Kuan (關中), as vice-chairmen; all appointments were approved by a hand count of party delegates. On February 13, 2007, Ma was indicted by the Taiwan High Prosecutors Office on charges of allegedly embezzling approximately NT$11 million (US$339,000), regarding the issue of "special expenses" while he was mayor of Taipei. Shortly after the indictment, he submitted his resignation as chairman of the Kuomintang. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 108 KB) Taken by User:Jiang at UC Berkeley on 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 108 KB) Taken by User:Jiang at UC Berkeley on 2006. ... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT... Wang Jin-pyng (Chinese: 王金平, pinyin: Wáng JÄ«npíng) (born March 17, 1941), Taiwanese politician, is the President of the Legislative Yuan. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chinese Kuomintang chairmanship election of 2005 was held on July 16, 2005 in the Republic of China (Taiwan) between Ma Ying-jeou and Wang Jin-pyng. ... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT... Wang Jin-pyng (Chinese: 王金平, pinyin: Wáng JÄ«npíng) (born March 17, 1941), Taiwanese politician, is the President of the Legislative Yuan. ... Wu Po-hsiung Wu Po-hsiung (Traditional Chinese: ; born June 19, 1939), a Taiwanese politician, is currently chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT). ... Chiang Pin-kung (Chinese: 江丙坤, pinyin: Jiāng BǐngkÅ«n) (born December 16, 1932) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


There has been a recent warming of relations between the pan-blue coalition and the PRC, with prominent members of both the KMT and PFP in active discussions with officials on the Mainland. In February 2004 , it appeared that KMT had opened a campaign office for the Lien-Soong ticket in Shanghai targeting Taiwanese businessmen. However, after an adverse reaction in Taiwan, the KMT quickly declared that the office was opened without official knowledge or authorization. In addition, the PRC issued a statement forbidding open campaigning in the Mainland and formally stated that it had no preference as to which candidate won and cared only about the positions of the winning candidate. The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ...


On March 28, 2005, thirty members of the Kuomintang (KMT), led by KMT vice chairman Chiang Pin-kung, arrived in mainland China, marking the first official visit by the KMT to the mainland since it was defeated by communist forces in 1949 (although KMT members including Chiang had made individual visits in the past). The delegates began their itinerary by paying homage to the revolutionary martyrs of the Tenth Uprising at Huanghuagang. They subsequently flew to the former ROC capital of Nanjing to commemorate Sun Yat-sen. During the trip KMT signed a 10-points agreement with the CPC. The opponents regarded this visit as the prelude of the third KMT-CPC cooperation. Weeks afterwards, in May, Chairman Lien Chan visited the mainland and met with Hu Jintao. No agreements were signed because Chen Shui-bian's government threatened to prosecute the KMT delegation for treason and violation of R.O.C. laws prohibiting citizens from collaborating with Communists. is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chiang Pin-kung (Chinese: 江丙坤, pinyin: Jiāng Bǐngkūn) (born December 16, 1932) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... March 28, 2005, Kuomintang vice chairman Chiang Pin-kung led a delegation in the first official visit to Mainland China by the highest Kuomintang leader in 60 years. ... For other uses, see Nanjing (disambiguation). ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Hu Hu Jintao (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born December 21, 1942) is currently the Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China, holding the titles of General Secretary of the Communist Party of China since 2002, President of the... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ...


Elections and results

Pan-blue supporters at a rally during the 2004 presidential election.
Pan-blue supporters at a rally during the 2004 presidential election.

With the party's voters defecting to both the PFP and TSU, the KMT did poorly in the December 2001 legislative elections and lost its position as the largest party in the Legislative Yuan. More recently, the party did well in the 2002 mayoral and council election with Ma Ying-jeou, its candidate for Taipei mayor, winning reelection by a landslide and its candidate for Kaohsiung mayor narrowly losing but doing surprisingly well. Since 2002 , the KMT and PFP have coordinated electoral strategies. In 2004 , the KMT and PFP ran a joint presidential ticket, with Lien running for president and Soong running for vice-president. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (792x866, 184 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (792x866, 184 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... The Election for the 5th Legislative Yuan (第五屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan was held on December 1, 2001. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Lingya District (苓雅區) Government  - Mayor Chen Chu (陳菊) Area  - Total 154 km² (59. ...


The loss of the presidential election of 2004 to DPP President Chen Shui-bian by merely over 30,000 votes was a bitter disappointment to party members, leading to a few rallies for a few weeks protesting alleged electoral fraud and the "odd circumstances" of the shooting of President Chen. However, the fortunes of the party were greatly improved when the KMT did well in the legislative elections held in December 2004 by maintaining its support in southern Taiwan achieving a majority for the pan-blue coalition. Soon after the election, there appeared to be a falling out with the KMT's junior partner the People's First Party and talk of a merger seemed to have ended. This split appeared to widen in early 2005, as the leader of the PFP, James Soong appeared to be reconciling with President Chen Shui-Bian and the Democratic Progressive Party. Many PFP members including legislators and municipal leaders have defected to the KMT, and the PFP is seen as a fading party. Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Chen and Lu, only minutes before the shooting incident The 3-19 shooting incident (三一九槍擊事件) was a possible assassination attempt on President Chen Shui-bian and Vice President Annette Lu while they were campaigning in Tainan on March 19, 2004, the day before the Republic of China presidential election. ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... James Chu-yu Soong (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; abbreviated to or ; Hanyu Pinyin: MínjìndÇŽng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has...


The KMT won a decisive victory in the 3-in-1 local elections of December 2005, replacing the DPP as the largest party at the local level. This was seen as a major victory for the party ahead of legislative elections in 2007. There were elections for the 2 Municipalities of the ROC, Taipei and Kaohsiung on December 2006. The KMT won a clear victory in Taipei, but lost to the DPP in the southern city of Kaohsiung by the slim margin of 1,100 votes. Graphic depiction of the city mayor / county magistrate election results (blue=KMT; green=DPP; orange=PFP; yellow=CNP; gray=independent; white=no election) Comparison of Pan-Blue vs. ... December 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → 31 December 2005 (Saturday) 25-year-old Scottish human rights worker Kate Burton and her parents are freed unharmed in the Gaza Strip by the Palestinian gunmen who kidnapped them two days earlier. ... A municipality or general-purpose district (compare with: special-purpose district) is an administrative local area generally composed of a clearly defined territory and commonly referring to a city, town, or village government. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Lingya District (苓雅區) Government  - Mayor Chen Chu (陳菊) Area  - Total 154 km² (59. ... KMT might stand for: Kuomintang, is a centre-right political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; abbreviated to or ; Hanyu Pinyin: MínjìndÇŽng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Lingya District (苓雅區) Government  - Mayor Chen Chu (陳菊) Area  - Total 154 km² (59. ...


Organization

The Kuomintang headquarters in Taipei City. In June 2006, the Kuomintang Central Committee moved to Bade building, a much more modest building, and has sold the original headquarters to private investors of the EVA Airways Corporation.
The Kuomintang headquarters in Taipei City. In June 2006, the Kuomintang Central Committee moved to Bade building, a much more modest building, and has sold the original headquarters to private investors of the EVA Airways Corporation.
The KMT maintains offices in all the major Chinatowns of the world. Its United States party headquarters are located in San Francisco Chinatown, directly across the Chinese Six Companies.
The KMT maintains offices in all the major Chinatowns of the world. Its United States party headquarters are located in San Francisco Chinatown, directly across the Chinese Six Companies.
The Kuomintang Eastern U.S. headquarters is in New York Chinatown.
The Kuomintang Eastern U.S. headquarters is in New York Chinatown.

Image File history File links New_KMT_Headquarters,_Taipei. ... Image File history File links New_KMT_Headquarters,_Taipei. ... Alternative meaning: Taipei County City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... June 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Extraordinary renditions. ... EVA Air (Chinese:長榮航空 Chángróng Hángkōng) is a Taiwanese airline based at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport near Taipei, Taiwan, operating passenger and dedicated cargo services to international destinations in Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and North America. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 97 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kuomintang Chinatown patterns in North America Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 97 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kuomintang Chinatown patterns in North America Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... This article is about sections of an urban area associated with a large number of Chinese residents or commercial activities. ... An interesection of Chinatown in San Francisco. ... The Chinese Six Companies (Chinese:六大公司) or Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (Chinese:中華公所) or Chong Wa Benevolent Association (Chinese:中華會館) is a historical Chinese Association established in various parts of the United States with large populations of Chinese. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 291 KB) Photo taken by author Jan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 291 KB) Photo taken by author Jan. ... A Chinese lion helps usher in the 2006 Chinese New Year. ...

List of leaders of the Kuomintang (1912-1914)

President:

  1. Song Jiaoren (1912-1913)

Premier: Sung Chiao-jen (Chinese characters: 宋教仁, Pinyin: Sòng Jiàorén) (1882–March 22, 1913) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

  1. Sun Yat-sen (1913-1914)

Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

List of leaders of the Kuomintang of China (1919-present)

Premier:

  1. Sun Yat-sen (1919-1925)
  2. Zhang Renjie (1925-1926)

Chairman of Central Executive Committee: Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the eventual overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. Hu Hanmin (1927-1931)
  2. Wang Jingwei (1931-1933)
  3. Chiang Kai-shek (1933-1938) (self-proclaimed)

Director-General: Hu Hanmin (Chinese:胡漢民(trad. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wang Jingwei * Courtesy name: Jixin (季新) * Alternate name: Zhaoming (兆銘). Wang Jingwei (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wang Ching-wei) (May 4, 1883 – November 10, 1944), was a Chinese politician. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. Chiang Kai-shek (1926-1927)
    Vacancy (1927-1935)
  2. Hu Hanmin (1935-1936)
    Vacancy (1936-1938)
  3. Chiang Kai-shek (1938-1975)

Chairman: Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hu Hanmin (Chinese:胡漢民(trad. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. Chiang Ching-kuo (1975-1988)
  2. Lee Teng-hui (1988-2000)
  3. Lien Chan (2000-2005)
  4. Ma Ying-jeou (2005-2007)
  5. Wu Po-hsiung (2007) (acting)
  6. Chiang Pin-kung (2007) (acting)
  7. Wu Po-hsiung (April 2007-present)

Chiang Ching-kuo (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: Jiǎng Jīngguó; Wade-Giles: Chiang Ching-kuo) (April 271, 1910 – January 13, 1988), Kuomintang (KMT) politician and leader, was the son of President Chiang Kai-shek and held numerous posts in the government of the Republic of China (from... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician of Taiwan. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Wu Po-hsiung Wu Po-hsiung (Traditional Chinese: ; born June 19, 1939), a Taiwanese politician, is currently chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Chiang Pin-kung (Chinese: 江丙坤, pinyin: Jiāng Bǐngkūn) (born December 16, 1932) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Wu Po-hsiung Wu Po-hsiung (Traditional Chinese: ; born June 19, 1939), a Taiwanese politician, is currently chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT). ... April 2007 is the fourth month of the year. ...

Current vice chairpersons

  • John Kuan (關中)
  • Lin Yi-shih (林益世)
  • Chang Jen-Hsiang (章仁香)
  • Chan Chuen-pao (詹春柏)

List of Secretaries-General of the Kuomintang of China

Seceretaries-General of the Central Executive Committee:

  1. Yeh Ch'u-ts'ang (1926-1927)
  2. Post abolished (1927-1929)
  3. Chen Li-fu (陳立夫) (1929-1931)
  4. Ting Wei-feng (1931)
  5. Yeh Ch'u-ts'ang (1931-1938)
  6. Chu Chia-hua (1938-1939)
  7. Yeh Ch'u-ts'ang (1939-1941)
  8. Wu Tieh-cheng (1941-1948)
  9. Cheng Yen-feng (1948-1950)

Seceretaries-General of the Central Reform Committee: Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. Chang Chi-yun (1950-1952)

Seceretaries-General of the Central Committee: Chang Chi-yun, historian, geographer, educator, politician. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. Chang Chi-yun (1952-1954)
  2. Chang Li-sheng (1954-1959)
  3. Tang Tsung (1959-1964)
  4. Ku Feng-hsiang (1944-1968)
  5. Chang Pao-shu (1968-1979)
  6. Chiang Yen-si (1979-1985)
  7. Ma Su-lei (1985-1987)
  8. Lee Huan (李煥) (1987-1989)
  9. James Soong (宋楚瑜) (1989-1993)
  10. Hsu Shui-teh (許水德) (1993-1996)
  11. Wu Po-hsiung (吳伯雄) (1996-1998)
  12. Chang Hsiao-yen (章孝嚴) (1998-1999)
  13. Huang Kun-fei (1999-2000)
  14. Lin Fong-cheng (林豐正) (2000-2005)
  15. Chan Chuen-pao (詹春柏) (2005-2007)
  16. Wu Tun-yi (吳敦義) (2007-present)

Chang Chi-yun, historian, geographer, educator, politician. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Lee Huan (Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born 1916) is a politician in the Republic of China. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... James Chu-yu Soong (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Wu Po-hsiung Wu Po-hsiung (Traditional Chinese: ; born June 19, 1939), a Taiwanese politician, is currently chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... John Hsiao-yen Chang (章孝嚴, pinyin: Zhāng Xiàoyán; born May 2, 1941) is a Kuomintang politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

See also

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... ‹ The template below (History of China - BC) is being considered for deletion. ... The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. ... The Republic of China (commonly known as Taiwan) maintains a large military establishment, which accounted for 16. ... Elections in the Republic of China gives information on election and election results in the Republic of China (with effective control over Taiwan, Quemoy, Matsu and some islands in the South China Sea since 1949). ... Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Chinese Nationalist Party is a political party active in the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... The Republic of China (ROC) currently administers two historical provinces of China (one completely and one for a small part) and centrally administers two municipalities: Taiwan Province; consists of the island of Taiwan, except the two municipalities, plus Penghu county (Pescadores Islands) and a number of outlying islands Sixteen counties... Taiwan Strait area The controversy regarding the political status of Taiwan hinges on whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of... The Revolutionary Committee of the Chinese Kuomintang (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨革命委員會Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党革命委员会 Pinyin: Zhōngguó Guómíndǎng Gémìngwěiyuánhuì) is one of eight registered minor political parties (in addition to the Communist Party of China) in the Peoples Republic of China. ...

References

  • Bergere, Marie-Claire; Janet Lloyd (2000). Sun Yat-sen. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-4011-9. 
  • Roy, Denny (2003). Taiwan: A Political History. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-8805-2. 

Notes

  1. ^ Art 1, Party Charter, Kuomintang of China [1]
  2. ^ "Taiwan's Kuomintang On the brink", Economist, 6th Dec. 2001. 

Further reading

  • Chris Taylor, "Taiwan's Seismic shift," Asian Wall Street Journal, February 4, 2004 (not available online)

is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Kuomintang Official Website
  • The History of Kuomintang
Flag of the Republic of China Politics of the Republic of China
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Executive Yuan | Legislative Yuan | Judicial Yuan | Control Yuan | Examination Yuan
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Kuomintang - MSN Encarta (504 words)
Kuomintang (Chinese, Nationalist Party), political party of China organized after the Revolution of 1911, by which the Qing (Manchu) dynasty was overthrown and a republican government was established in China.
By late 1928 this campaign had largely succeeded; the Kuomintang then began a period of “political tutelage,” during which the party was to run the government while educating the people about their political rights.
The Kuomintang and remnants of its armies withdrew in the summer of 1949 to the island of Taiwan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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