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Encyclopedia > Kuniaki Koiso

Kuniaki Koiso (小磯 國昭 Koiso Kuniaki, March 22, 1880November 3, 1950) was the 41st Prime Minister of Japan from July 22, 1944 to April 7, 1945. March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (82nd in Leap years). ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the English political nomenclature of the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


Koiso was born in Tochigi Prefecture in the year 1880. A career soldier, Koiso graduated from Japan's Army Academy in 1900 and went on to attend the nation's War College. He eventually attained the rank of general. Koiso's career took off rapidly in the 1920s and 1930s, when he held a variety of prominent military and governmental positions. These positions included Chief of the Material Mobilization Bureau of the Ministry of War (1929-1930), Chief of the Military Affairs Bureau of the Ministry of War (1930-1931), Vice Minister of War (1932), Chief of the Kwantung Army in occupied Manchuria (1932-1934), and Minister of Overseas Affairs (1939, 1940). Koiso was Governor-General of Korea from 1942 to 1944, where he gained the nickname "The Tiger of Korea" for his looks rather than his military prowess.[1] Tochigi Prefecture (栃木県 Tochigi-ken) is a located in the Kanto region on the island of Honshu, Japan. ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... A General is an officer of high military rank. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Social issues of the 1920s. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The Kwantung Army or Guandong Army (関東軍 Japanese: Kantōgun) was a unit of the Imperial Japanese Army that originated from a Guandong garrison established in 1906 to defend the Kwantung Leased Territory and the areas adjacent to the South Manchurian Railway. ... Manchuria (Manchu: Manju; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲; Simplified Chinese: 满洲; pinyin: MÇŽnzhōu, Russian: ) is a vast territorial region in northeast Asia. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... During the period between 1910 and 1948 there were various Governors of Korea. ...

Contents


Military career

2dLt (Infantry)--30th Infantry Regiment, June 1901; 1stLt, November 1903; Battalion Adjutant, 30th Infantry, September 1904; Company Commander, same regiment, March 1905; Captain, June 1905; was graduated from War College, November 1910;Instructor, Military Academy, December 1910; Army Staff Officer, Kwantung Government--General, September 1912; Major-Battalion Commander, 2d Infantry Regiment, August 1914; Army General Staff Headquarters, June 1915; LtCol, July 1918; Staff Officer, 12th Division, August 1918; Chief of Staff (LOC), 12th Division, September 1918; Army General Staff Headquarters, April 1919; Army Air Service, July 1921; Colonel, February 1922; official duty, Europe, June 1922; Regimental Commander, 51st Infantry, August 1923 A War College is a senior military academy which is normally intended for veteran military officers and whose purpose is to educate and train on senior military tactics and leadership. ... A military academy is a military educational institution. ... Kwantung (Simplified Chinese: 关东; Traditional Chinese: 關東; pinyin: Guāndōng; Wade-Giles: Kuan-tung) is a coastal area of northeastern China which is remembered most for its connection to Japans Kwantung Army. ... The United States Army Air Service was a forerunner of the United States Air Force. ...


August 1923; Section Chief, Army General Staff, May 1925; Military Instructor, War College (MajGen), December 1926; Chief,Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department, July 1927; Chief, Materiel Mobilization Bureau, War Ministry, August 1929; Chief, Military Affairs Bureau, same Ministry, August 1930; LtGen, August 1931; Vice-Minister of War, February 1932; Chief of Staff, Kwantung Army-concurrently Chief, Special Service Department, same army, August 1932; 5th Division Commander (Hiroshima), March 1934; Commanding General, Korea Army, December 1935; General, November 1937; Army General Staff, July 1938. A War College is a senior military academy which is normally intended for veteran military officers and whose purpose is to educate and train on senior military tactics and leadership. ... The Kwantung Army or Guandong Army (関東軍 Japanese: Kantōgun) was a unit of the Imperial Japanese Army that originated from a Guandong garrison established in 1906 to defend the Kwantung Leased Territory and the areas adjacent to the South Manchurian Railway. ... Hiroshima City Hall Mayor Tadatoshi Akiba Address 〒730-8586 Hiroshima-shi, Naka-ku, Kokutaiji 1-6-34 Phone number 082-245-2111 Official website: Hiroshima City , // The city of Hiroshima ) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, the largest of...


Entry into politics

During 1920s period he was in the Toseiha (Control Group) faction led by General Kazushige Ugaki, along with Gen Sugiyama, Yoshijiro Umezu, Tetsuzan Nagata, and Hideki Tojo. They represented relative moderation, in opposition to the radical Kodaha (Action Group) under Sadao Araki. During 1944, assumed the leading of the "Kodoha" Party, joining the post of Prime Ministry of Japan. The Toseiha (統制派) was a faction in the Japanese military, active in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Kazushige Ugaki (宇垣 一成 Ugaki Kazushige; August 21, 1868, Okayama prefecture, Japan - 30 April 1956, Tokyo) was a Japanese general. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... General Yoshijiro Umezu ) (January 4, 1882 - January 8, 1949) was the chief commander of the Japanese army in World War II. In the 1920s Umezu was a member of the Tosei-Ha (Control Group) led by General Kazushige Ugaki along with Gen Sugiyama, Koiso Kuniaki, Tetsuzan Nagata and Hideki Tojo. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Hideki Tojo (Kyūjitai: 東條 英機; Shinjitai: 東条 英機; ) (December 30, 1884 – December 23, 1948) was a General in the Imperial Japanese Army, a ultranationalist thinker, and the 40th Prime Minister of Japan; he served as prime minister during much of World War II, from October 18, 1941 to July 22, 1944. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Imperial Way Faction (Kodoha) was a right-wing nationalist Japanese political grouping, active in the 1930s. ...


He restored the ancient sacred rites in the Sukumo river, near Hakone, the "Preliminary Misogi Rite". He defended the State Shintoism doctrine, along with Heisuke Yanagawa, who directed the Government Imperial Aid Association and Chikao Fujisawa, a member of the Diet, who proposed a law that Shinto should be reaffirmed as state religion, as in past times. Mt. ... The Preliminary Misogi Rite was an ancient ritual of the Shinto religion in Japan. ... A torii at Itsukushima Shrine Shintō (Japanese: 神道) is the native religion of Japan and was the state religion of Japan for Japanese militarism in times from about end of the 19th century to the end of World War II. It involves the worship of kami, which could be translated... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The National Diet of Japan (国会; Kokkai) is Japans legislature. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... A state religion (also called an official religion, established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ...


Later career

Retired to first reserve list, July 1938; Ministry of Greater East Asia (Japan), April 1939; released from post, August 1939; Ministry of Greater East Asia (Japan),January 1940; released from post, July 1940; Governor-General of Korea, May 1942; Prime Minister, July 1944; Commander-in-Chief, Imperial Volunteer Corps, April 1945; resigned as Premier, April 1945. The Ministry of Greater East Asia, originally called the Ministry for Colonization, was organized in 1929 to oversee the territories Japan would acquire in their expansionist efforts. ... During the period between 1910 and 1948 there were various Governors of Korea. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... The Imperial Volunteer Corps was created in Japan during 1944-45, as armed civil defense units supporting the Japanese Armed Forces, and for the defense of the country in last decisive battle on the homeland. ...


In 1944, with the downfall of Hideki Tojo's government, Koiso was chosen to serve as the new Prime Minister of Japan despite strong competition from senior army officials. During his term in office, Japanese forces faced multiple defeats at the hands of the United States Military. In the same period it was reported to Premier Koiso that Wang Chingwei had died of pneumonia in a Japanese hospital in Nagoya, on November 10, 1944. A Foreign Ministry official was quoted as saying in respect: "With his [Wang's] death, all our past efforts to sustain the Nanjing regime ended in disaster". For a time, Koiso considered making peace with the Allies, but he could not find a solution that would appease either the Japanese military or the Americans. Left with little choice but to continue the war effort, Koiso eventually tried to extend his power over the army by attempting to assume the position of War Minister, but failed to do so because he was on the list of inactive generals. Koiso eventually resigned in 1945 when U.S. forces attacked Okinawa. After the war, he was captured by the Allies and tried by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East for war crimes. Upon conviction, he was given a sentence of life imprisonment. Koiso died in 1950 while serving his sentence. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Hideki Tojo (KyÅ«jitai: 東條 英機; Shinjitai: 東条 英機; ) (December 30, 1884 – December 23, 1948) was a General in the Imperial Japanese Army, a ultranationalist thinker, and the 40th Prime Minister of Japan; he served as prime minister during much of World War II, from October 18, 1941 to July 22, 1944. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Wang Jingwei (Traditional Chinese: 汪精衛, Simplified Chinese: 汪精卫, Hanyu Pinyin: Wāng Jīngwèi, Wade-Giles: Wang Ching-wei) (1883 - November 1944), was a member of the left wing of the Kuomintang and is most noted from breaking with Chiang Kai-Shek and forming a Japanese supported collaborationist government in Nanjing. ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the microscopic, alveoli (air-filled sacs) responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... Nagoya Castle in June of 2004. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... When spelt with a capital A, Allies usually denotes the countries supporting the Triple Entente who fought together against the Central Powers in World War I and against the Axis Powers in World War II. For more information, see the related articles: Allies of World War I and Allies of... A defence minister ( Commonwealth English) or defense minister ( American English) is a cabinet portfolio (position) which regulates the armed forces in a sovereign nation. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... This article is about the prefecture. ... President of the Tribunal, Sir William Webb, Justice of the High Court of Australia, presiding over the Tribunal in 1946. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


External links

  • National Diet Library photos and biography
Prime Ministers of Japan Flag of Japan
Ito - Kuroda - Yamagata - Matsukata - Ito (2nd) - Matsukata (2nd) - Ito (3rd) - Okuma - Yamagata (2nd) - Ito (4th) - Katsura - Saionji - Katsura (2nd) - Saionji (2nd) - Katsura (3rd) - Yamamoto - Okuma (2nd) - Terauchi - Hara - Takahashi - To. Kato - Yamamoto (2nd) - Kiyoura - Ta. Kato - Wakatsuki - G. Tanaka - Hamaguchi - Wakatsuki (2nd) - Inukai - Saito - Okada - Hirota - Hayashi - Konoe - Hiranuma - Abe - Yonai - Konoe (2nd) - Tojo - Koiso - K. Suzuki - Prince Higashikuni - Shidehara - Yoshida - Katayama - Ashida - Yoshida (2nd) - Hatoyama - Ishibashi - Kishi - Ikeda - Sato - K. Tanaka - Miki - Fukuda - Ohira - Z. Suzuki - Nakasone - Takeshita - Uno - Kaifu - Miyazawa - Hosokawa - Hata - Murayama - Hashimoto - Obuchi - Mori - Koizumi
Preceded by:
Jiro Minami of Korea
Japanese Governor-General in Korea
1942-1944
Succeeded by:
Nobuyuki Abe

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Masayoshi Ōhira (大平 正芳 Ōhira Masayoshi March 12, 1910–June 12, 1980) was a Japanese politician and the 68th and 69th Prime Minister of Japan from December 7, 1978 to June 12, 1980. ... Zenko Suzuki Zenkō Suzuki (鈴木 善幸 Suzuki Zenkō; January 11, 1911–July 19, 2004) was a Japanese politician and the 70th Prime Minister of Japan from July 17, 1980 to November 27, 1982. ... Yasuhiro Nakasone (中曽根 康弘 Nakasone Yasuhiro, b. ... Noboru Takeshita Noboru Takeshita (竹下 ç™» Takeshita Noboru, February 26, 1924–June 19, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 74th Prime Minister of Japan from November 6, 1987 to June 3, 1989. ... Sōsuke Uno (宇野 宗佑 Uno Sōsuke August 27, 1922–May 19, 1998) was a Japanese politician and the 75th Prime Minister of Japan from June 3, 1989 to August 10, 1989. ... Toshiki Kaifu Toshiki Kaifu (海部 俊樹; born Dr Adam Liew on January 2, 1931) is a Japanese politician who was the 76th and 77th Prime Minister of Japan from 1989 to 1991. ... Kiichi Miyazawa Kiichi Miyazawa (宮澤 喜一 Miyazawa Kiichi) (born 1919) is a Japanese politician and was the 78th Prime Minister from November 5, 1991 to August 9, 1993. ... Morihiro Hosokawa Morihiro Hosokawa (細川 è­·ç…• Hosokawa Morihiro, b. ... Tsutomu Hata (羽田 孜 Hata Tsutomu, b. ... Tomiichi Murayama Tomiichi Murayama (村山 富市 Murayama Tomiichi, born March 3, 1924) was the 81st Prime Minister of Japan from June 30, 1994 to January 11, 1996 and was replaced by Ryutaro Hashimoto. ... Ryutaro Hashimoto (橋本龍太郎 Hashimoto RyÅ«tarō, July 29, 1937 - July 1, 2006) was a Japanese politician who served as the 82nd and 83rd Prime Minister of Japan from January 11, 1996 to July 30, 1998. ... Keizo Obuchi Keizo Obuchi (小渕恵三; Obuchi Keizō June 25, 1937–May 14, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 84th Prime Minister of Japan from July 30, 1998 to April 5, 2000. ... Yoshiro Mori Yoshiro Mori (森 喜朗 Mori Yoshirō, born July 14, 1937) is a Japanese politician who served as the 85th and 86th Prime Minister of Japan from April 5, 2000 to April 26, 2001. ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is the current Prime Minister of Japan. ... Jiro Minami (1874 - 1955) was the General Officer Commanding 16th Division from 1926 to 1927, Vice Chief General Staff from 1927 to 1929, Commander in Chief Chosen Army from 1929 to 1930 Japanese Minister of War in 1931, a member of the Supreme War Council from 1931 to 1934, commander... Korea (Korean: (ì¡°ì„  or 한국, see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... Governor-General (or Governor General) is a term used both historically and currently to designate the appointed representative of a head of state or their government for a particular territory, historically in a colonial context, but no longer necessarily in that form. ... Korea (Korean: (ì¡°ì„  or 한국, see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... Nobuyuki Abe Nobuyuki Abe (阿部 信行 Abe Nobuyuki, November 24, 1875–September 7, 1953) was a Japanese soldier and politician, and was the 36th Prime Minister of Japan from August 30, 1939 to January 16, 1940. ...

References

  1. ^ Toland, John: "The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-1945", page 529
  • Republic of Korea

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kuniaki Koiso - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (639 words)
Kuniaki Koiso (小磯 国昭 Koiso Kuniaki, March 22, 1880–November 3, 1950) was the 41st Prime Minister of Japan from July 22, 1944 to April 7, 1945.
Koiso was born in Tochigi Prefecture in 1880.
Koiso was Governor-General of Korea from 1942 to 1944, where he gained the nickname "The Tiger of Korea" for his harsh administration.
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