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Encyclopedia > Kubrat
Kubrat
Khan of Bulgaria
Reign 632668
Predecessor none
Successor Batbayan
Issue Batbayan
Kotrag
Asparukh
Kuber (possibly)
Royal House Dulo
Kubrat's Great Bulgaria and adjacent regions,
c. 650 AD

Kubrat or Kurt (Bulgarian: Кубрат; Greek: Χουβρατις) was a Bulgar ruler credited with creating the confederation of Old Great Bulgaria in 632 by defeating the Avars and uniting under a single rule all the Bulgar tribes. Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Events Childeric II succeeds Clotaire III as Frankish king Constantine IV becomes Byzantine Emperor, succeeding Constans II Theodore of Tarsus made archbishop of Canterbury. ... Batbayan (d. ... Khan Asparoukh (681 - 700) THEN CAME ACROSS THE DANUBE Isperukh Khan. ... Kotrag Khan was the founder of Volga Bulgaria. ... Khan Asparukh or Khan Asparoukh or Khan Asparuh (Bulgarian: Аспарух) (d. ... For the Hindu god, see Kubera Khan Kuber (Кубер in Bulgarian, also spelled Kuver) was a Bulgar leader from the 7th century who belonged to the same clan as the Danubian Bulgarian khan Asparukh - they both were sons of khan Kubrat. ... The Dulo Clan or the House of Dulo was the name of the ruling dynasty of the early Bulgars. ... Image File history File links Khazar0. ... Image File history File links Khazar0. ... Old Great Bulgaria or Great Bulgaria (Η παλαιά μεγάλη Βουλγαρία in Byzantine chronicles; alternative name: Onoguria/Onoghuria) was a Bulgar state, founded by Kubrat, which briefly existed in the 7th century north of the Caucasus mountains in the steppe between the rivers Dnieper and Lower Volga[1]. // Main article: Kubrat Kubrat (also Kurt or... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ... Bulgar warriors slaughter Byzantines, from the Menology of Basil II, 10th century. ...

Contents

Historical data

The name Kubrat is first mentioned by Patriarch Nikephoros I of Constantinople, in his Historia syntomos, breviarium in the 9th century. In the Nominalia of the Bulgarian khans Kubrat is mentioned as Kurt of the Dulo clan. He had a Bulgar mother and an Avar father. A later legend would describe him as a descendant of Attila the Hun. Some historians conclude that his maternal line was of the Ermy clan, because his maternal uncle Organa was possibly of that clan.[1] St. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... The Nominalia of the Bulgarian khans (Bulgarian: ) is a short manuscript containing the names of some early Bulgarian rulers, their clans, the year of their ascending to the throne and the length of their rule, including the times of joint rule and civil war. ... The Dulo Clan or the House of Dulo was the name of the ruling dynasty of the early Bulgars. ... For the people of Central Asia see Bulgars Bulgar language is an extinct language commonly considered Turkic but more recently Indo-Iranian Bulgar, or bulgarish is Yiddish word for Romanian dance bugarească (means Bulgarian cf. ... The word Avars can mean: The nomadic people that conquered the Hungarian Steppe in the early Middle Ages, the Eurasian Avars. ... Attila (AD 406 - 453), also known as Attila the Hun was Khan of the Hun people from 434 until his death and leader of the Hunnic Empire. ... Very little is know about Organa. ...


Kubrat spent time at the Byzantine court, either as a hostage or for protection from the dynastic war within the Turkic Khaganate. As the 7th century Byzantine historian John of Nikiu narrates: The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Gokturks or Kokturks (Gök-Turks or Kök-Turks, with the meaning Celestial Turks), known as Tujue (突厥 tu2 jue2) in medieval Chinese sources, established the first known Turkic state around 552 under the leadership of Bumin/Tuman Khan/Khaghan (died 552) and his sons, and expanded... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... John of Nikiû was a Coptic bishop of Nikiû/Pashati in the Egyptian Delta and appointed general adminstrator of the monsteries of Upper Egypt in 696. ...

Quetrades (i.e. Kubrat), the prince of the Moutanes (i.e.Huns), and a nephew of Kuemaka (i.e.Organa), was baptized as a child and was educated in Constantinople and received into the Christian community in his childhood and had grown up in the imperial palace.' He was a close friend of emperor Heraclius. [2]

Whether he was a child or an adult during his time in Constantinople is unclear, as the year of his birth is unknown. The exact time of this event is also unknown but probably coincided with the reign of Emperor Heraclius (610-641). If the above text really applies to Kubrat then it becomes clear that during his stay in Constantinople he was educated and baptized. Probably at the same time he was given the title Patrician which was inscribed on his ring. The Huns were a confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas. ... Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas. ... Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas and becomes Emperor. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... This article is about the social and political class in ancient Rome. ...

Quote from the Patriarch Nikephoros' Short History[3] mentioning Kubrat as ruler of the Unogundurs and the expelling of the Avars

Upon return Kubrat was endorsed by his uncle[citation needed], the Avar khagan, as baltavar[citation needed], and took power over his tribe, the Unogundur Bulgars, from Organa who had acted as regent until then. At some point, as Patriarch Nikephoros tells us, Kubrat expelled the Avar troops from his lands and ruled singlehandedly over the united Bulgars thus creating the Great Bulgaria, as it was known to its contemporaries. Under his rule the Old Great Bulgaria grew to stretch from the Danube delta to the Volga river, and was recognized by an international treaty signed with Byzantium in 635. Kubrat ruled in peace with the Byzantine Empire, a result of his close friendship with the Byzantine emperor and, conceivably, of his appreciation of Byzantine culture.jackson rules Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The word Avars can mean: The nomadic people that conquered the Hungarian Steppe in the early Middle Ages, the Eurasian Avars. ... Khagan or Great Khan, alternatively spelled Chagan, Qaqan, Khakhan, Khaghan, Kagan, Khaqan etc. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... The Danube (ancient Danuvius, Iranian *dānu, meaning river or stream, ancient Greek Istros) is the longest river in the European Union and Europes second longest river. ... For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Events Saint Aidan founds Lindisfarne in Northumbria, England Nestorian China Births Pippin of Herstal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia (approximate date) 23 May - Chan Bahlum II, king of Palenque Deaths Categories: 635 ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ...


Gravesite

Main article: Pereshchepina hoard

In 1912 Ukrainian peasants in the vicinity of Poltava literally stumbled over a gravesite replete with magnificent gold and silver objects of total weight of 75 kg, including a ring which eventually allowed identification of the grave as that belonging to Khan Kubrat. The ring was inscribed "Chouvr(a)Tou patr(i)k(iou)", indicating the status he had achieved in the Byzantine world. The hilt of Kuvrats sword bears a Greek inscription and is decorated with crosses, indicating that its owner (or the original owner at least) was a Christian. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Location Map of Ukraine with Poltava highlighted. ...


Modern uses

Kubrat Knoll on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica is named after Kubrat of Great Bulgaria. Kubrat Knoll (Kubratova Mogila ku-bra-to-va mo-gi-la) is a rocky peak of elevation 140 m at the base of Inott Point, eastern Livingston Island. ... Livingston Island (62°36′ S 060°30′ W) is 61 km (38 mi) long and from 3 to 32 km (2 to 20 mi) wide, lying between Greenwich and Snow Islands in the South Shetland Islands. ... The South Shetland Islands or Iles Shetland du Sud or Islas Shetland del Sur or New South Britain or New South Shetland or Shetland Islands or South Shetlands or Sydshetland or Süd-Shetland Inseln are a chain of islands in the Southern Ocean lying about 120 kilometres northward of...


References

  1. ^ Vasil Zlatarski, History of Bulgaria
  2. ^ John of Nikiû, Chronicle
  3. ^ Nicephori Archiepiscopi Constantinopolitani Opuscula Historica, editor Carl G. de Boor, 24, 9-12.

Vasil Zlatarski is a famous Bulgarian historian. ... John of Nikiû was a Coptic bishop of Nikiû/Pashati in the Egyptian Delta and appointed general administrator of the monsteries of Upper Egypt in 696. ...

External links

www.jacksonrulestheworld.com

Preceded by
Organa
List of Bulgarian monarchs Succeeded by
Batbayan
Bulgarian monarchs
Great Bulgaria (632–681)

Kubrat | Batbayan Very little is know about Organa. ... // Rulers of Bulgaria Note on titles According to a controversial 17th century Volga Bulgar source, early Bulgar leaders bore the title of baltavar, which might mean ruler of Avars, although this is likely a folk etymology. ... Khan Asparoukh (681 - 700) THEN CAME ACROSS THE DANUBE Isperukh Khan. ... // Rulers of Bulgaria Note on titles According to a controversial 17th century Volga Bulgar source, early Bulgar leaders bore the title of baltavar, which might mean ruler of Avars, although this is likely a folk etymology. ... In 632, Khan Kubrat united the Bulgars and formed a confederation of tribes, known as Great Bulgaria, or Bulgaria Magna, with a capital at the ancient city of Fanagoria. ... Batbayan (d. ...


First Bulgarian Empire (681–1018) The First Bulgarian Empire was founded in 681 AD in the lands near the Danube delta and disintegrated in 1018 AD by annexion to the Byzantine Empire. ...


Asparukh | Tervel | Kormesiy | Sevar | Kormisosh | Vinekh | Telets | Sabin | Umor | Toktu | Pagan | Telerig | Kardam | Krum | Omurtag | Malamir | Presian | Boris I | Vladimir | Simeon I | Peter I | Boris II | Roman | Samuil | Gavril Radomir | Ivan Vladislav | Presian II Asparukh or Isperikh (Bulgarian: Аспарух, Asparuh or Исперих, Isperih) was ruler of the Bulgarians in the second half of the 7th century and is credited with the establishment of the First Bulgarian Empire in 680/681. ... Tervel (Bulgarian: Тервел) also called Tarvel, or Terval, or Terbelis in some Byzantine sources, was the ruler of the Bulgars at the beginning of the 8th century. ... Kormesiy or better Kormesij was a ruler of Danubian Bulgaria in the first half of the 8th century. ... Sevar (Bulgarian: ) was a ruler of Bulgaria in the 8th century. ... Kormisosh was Khan of Bulgaria between 753 and 756. ... Vinekh or better Vineh was ruler of Bulgaria in the mid-8th century. ... Telets or better Telec, was the ruler of Bulgaria 762–765. ... Sabin was the ruler of Bulgaria 765–766. ... Umor was the ruler of Bulgaria in 766. ... Toktu (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria 766–767. ... Pagan was the ruler of Bulgaria 767–768. ... Telerig was the ruler of Bulgaria 768–777. ... Kardam (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria 777–after 796/before 803. ... Krum (Bulgarian: ) (died April 13, 814) was ruler of Bulgaria, from after 796/ before 803 to 814. ... Omurtag or Omortag (Bulgarian: ) was ruler of Bulgaria from 814 to 831. ... Malamir (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria 831–836. ... Presian I was the ruler of Bulgaria 836–852. ... Boris I Michail or Boris I Michael (Bulgarian Борис I Михаил, known also as Bogoris)(died May 2, 907) was the khan from 852 to 889 and first Christian ruler of Bulgaria. ... Vladimir-Rasatte (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria from 889 to 893. ... Simeon (also Symeon)[1] I the Great (Bulgarian: , transliterated Simeon I Veliki;[2] IPA: ) ruled over Bulgaria from 893 to 927,[3] during the First Bulgarian Empire. ... Czar Peter I of Bulgaria (927-969), the son of Czar Simeon the Great of Bulgaria, was married to Maria Irena, the granddaughter of Byzantine Emperor Romanus I Lecapenus. ... Czar Boris II of Bulgaria, the son of Czar Peter I of Bulgaria ruled for three years (969-972). ... Roman (Bulgarian: Роман) was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 977 and 997 (in Byzantine captivity from 991). ... Samuil (Bulgarian: Самуил) (ca. ... Gavril Radomir was the ruler of Bulgaria from October 1014 to August or September 1015. ... Ivan Vladislav was the ruler of Bulgaria from August or September 1015 to August or September 1018. ... Presian II (or also Prusian), was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for a short time in 1018. ...


Second Bulgarian Empire (1186–1396) The Second Bulgarian Empire was a medieval Bulgarian state which existed between 1185 and 1396 (or 1422). ...


Ivan Asen I | Peter IV | Ivanko | Kaloyan | Boril | Ivan Asen II | Kaliman I Asen | Michael Asen I | Kaliman II Asen | Mitso Asen | Constantine I Tikh | Ivailo | Ivan Asen III | George Terter I | Smilets | Chaka | Theodore Svetoslav | George Terter II | Michael Shishman | Ivan Stephen | Ivan Alexander | Ivan Shishman | Ivan Sratsimir Ivan Asen I (also Ioan Asen I, in English John Asen I), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria 1189-1196. ... Peter IV (in Bulgarian Petăr IV, or commonly but less accurately Petăr II) (Bulgarian: ) ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria 1185-1197. ... Ivanko (Bulgarian: ) killed Ivan Asen I, ruler of the renascent Second Bulgarian Empire, in 1196. ... Kaloyan Asen, Kalojan, Johannizza, John, The Romankiller (c. ... Boril was the son of a sister of Tsar Kaloyan. ... Portrait of Ivan Asen II from the Zograf Monastery on Mount Athos, 1817 Ivan Asen II (Bulgarian: Иван Асен II, and also Йоан Асен II, Ioan Asen II, in English sometimes John Asen II), emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1218 to 1241. ... Kaliman I of Bulgaria was the son of Tsar Ivan Asen II and Anna Maria of Hungary. ... Michael Asen I of Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Михаил Асен I, Mihail Asen I; often inconsistently styled Michael II Asen), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1246 to 1256. ... Kaliman II of Bulgaria was the son of Alexander. ... Mitso Asen (Bulgarian: ) emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1256 until 1257. ... Tsar Constantine Tikh of Bulgaria (ruled 1257-1277) took the throne of Bulgaria after the assasination of Michael II Asen of Bulgaria in 1256. ... Ivailo (Bulgarian: Ивайло ), nicknamed Bărdokva (radish or lettuce) or Lakhanas (cabbage) was a rebel leader in Bulgaria in 1277 and reigned as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1278 to 1279. ... Tsar Ivan Asen III of Bulgaria was the son of Tsar Mico Asen and his wife Princess Maria of Bulgaria. ... Tsar George I of Bulgaria was married twice. ... Tsar Smilets of Bulgaria was married to Princess Maria of Byzantine. ... Tsar Chaka was tsar of Bulgaria from 1298-1300. ... Theodore Svetoslav (Bulgarian: Тодор Светослав, Todor Svetoslav and also Теодор Светослав, Teodor Svetoslav), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1300 to 1322. ... Tsar George II of Bulgaria was monarch of Bulgaria from 1322 to 1323. ... Michael Asen III (Bulgarian: Михаил Асен III, Mihail Asen III, commonly called Michael Shishman (Михаил Шишман, Mihail Å iÅ¡man) or Michael III Shishman), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1323 to 1330. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ivan Alexander (Bulgarian: , transliterated Ivan AleksandÇŽr;[1] IPA: ), also known as John Alexander,[2] ruled as Emperor (Tsar) of Bulgaria from 1331 to 1371,[3] during the Second Bulgarian Empire. ... Tsar Ivan Shishman of Bulgarian was the son of Tsar Ivan Alexander and his second wife Theodora. ... Ivan Sratsimir or Ivan Stratsimir (Bulgarian: ) was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria in Vidin from 1356 to 1397. ...


Kingdom of Bulgaria (1878–1946) The Treaty of San Stefano of March 3, 1878 provided for an independent Bulgarian state, which spanned over the geographical regions of Moesia, Thrace and Macedonia. ...


Alexander I | Ferdinand I | Boris III | Simeon II Alexander Joseph of Battenberg (April 5, 1857 - November 17, 1893), the first prince of modern Bulgaria, reigned from April 29, 1879 to September 7, 1886). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria (January 30, 1894 – August 28, 1943), originally Boris Klemens Robert Maria Pius Ludwig Stanislaus Xaver, son of Ferdinand I, came to the throne in 1918 upon the abdication of his father, following Bulgarias defeat in World War I. This was the countrys second... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Birth of Great Bulgaria, Khan Kubrat (2948 words)
651 AD After Kubrat's death, the State is divided between his five sons; the youngest, khan Asparukh establishes the new Bulgarian capital in the South of the delta of Danube (Ongula); khan Kotragh, the second son, moves to the North-East and sets up the Volga Bulgaria (capital Bulgar, nowadays Kazan in Tatarstan, Russia).
It was at the town of Phanagoria on the coast of the Azov Sea.
The decisive support of khan Kubrat to Martina, widow of his friend, the emperor of the East Roman Empire Heraclius, and her son Heraclonas, is described in the Chronicle of John, Bishop of Nikiou.
Wikipedia: Kubrat (268 words)
Kubrat (also Kurt, Kovrat, Kobrat, Kuvrat, Kubert, Korbat, Khudbard, Kuvarog, Krovat Kurbat and even Bashtu) was an early Bulgar ruler.
Kubrat was endorsed by Khan Sibir as the first king of Onogur, the 2nd Avar dynasty.
Kubrat established peace with Byzantium, due to his respect for Byzantine culture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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